Leeds United

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
468 189 125 154 641 573 +68 692 12

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Gary Kelly 325
Ian Harte 214
Nigel Martyn 207
Lee Bowyer 203
David Wetherall 201
Lucas Radebe 197
Harry Kewell 181
Rod Wallace 178
Alan Smith 171
Gary McAllister 151

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Mark Viduka 59
Harry Kewell 45
Rod Wallace 42
Lee Bowyer 38
Alan Smith 38
Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 34
Brian Deane 32
Ian Harte 28
Tony Yeboah 24
Gary McAllister 24

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Leeds United 6-1 Bradford City 13th May 2001 2000-2001
Charlton Athletic 1-6 Leeds United 5th April 2003 2002-2003
Leeds United 5-0 Tottenham Hotspur 25th August 1992 1992-1993
Swindon Town 0-5 Leeds United 7th May 1994 1993-1994
Derby County 0-5 Leeds United 15th March 1998 1997-1998
West Ham United 1-5 Leeds United 1st May 1999 1998-1999
Leeds United 4-0 Wimbledon 2nd October 1993 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 0-4 Leeds United 4th April 1994 1993-1994
Leeds United 4-0 Queens Park Rangers 24th January 1995 1994-1995
Leeds United 4-0 Ipswich Town 5th April 1995 1994-1995

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Portsmouth 6-1 Leeds United 8th November 2003 2003-2004
Liverpool FC 5-0 Leeds United 20th January 1996 1995-1996
Arsenal 5-0 Leeds United 16th April 2004 2003-2004
Sheffield Wednesday 6-2 Leeds United 16th December 1995 1995-1996
Manchester City 4-0 Leeds United 7th November 1992 1992-1993
Tottenham Hotspur 4-0 Leeds United 20th February 1993 1992-1993
Leeds United 0-4 Norwich City 21st August 1993 1993-1994
Leeds United 0-4 Manchester United 7th September 1996 1996-1997
Liverpool FC 4-0 Leeds United 19th February 1997 1996-1997
Leeds United 0-4 Arsenal 16th April 2000 1999-2000

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Howard Wilkinson 5 10th September 1996
George Graham 3 1st October 1998
David O’Leary 4 27th June 2002
Terry Venables 1 21st March 2003
Peter Reid 2 10th November 2003
Eddie Gray 1 31st May 2004

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Leeds United 0-2 Manchester United 27th April 1994 41,125 1993-1994
Leeds United 3-4 Newcastle United 22nd December 2001 40,287 2001-2002
Leeds United 1-1 Manchester United 25th April 1999 40,255 1998-1999
Leeds United 1-0 Middlesbrough 11th May 2002 40,218 2001-2002
Leeds United 0-4 Liverpool FC 3rd February 2002 40,216 2001-2002
Leeds United 3-1 Aston Villa 11th May 2003 40,205 2002-2003
Leeds United 2-1 Tottenham Hotspur 4th November 2001 40,203 2001-2002
Leeds United 0-1 Newcastle United 6th February 1999 40,202 1998-1999
Leeds United 3-2 Everton 19th December 2001 40,201 2001-2002
Leeds United 1-4 Arsenal 28th September 2002 40,199 2002-2003

 

Intro

Leeds United were one of the biggest clubs in England when the Premier League was formed. They were the reigning English champions when the new era began in 1992 and were a regular finisher in the top six throughout the first decade. This included a 3rd place finish under David O’Leary’s management in 2000. Leeds spent big to try and break Manchester United’s dominance but this led to crippling debts. Just three years after reaching the Champions League semi-finals, Leeds were relegated in 2004 and haven’t been back in the top-flight since.

 

1992-1993

Having finished as champions in the last Football League season before the formation of the Premier League, Leeds United struggled and finished just two points clear of relegation. They were knocked out of the UEFA Champions League by Scottish champions Rangers, bizarrely sold Eric Cantona to Pennines rivals Manchester United and failed to win a single league match away from Elland Road. Form was better on home turf for Howard Wilkinson’s side, with heavy wins against Blackburn Rovers and Tottenham Hotspur, whilst Lee Chapman was one of the star performers, scoring 13 goals.

 

1993-1994

Wilkinson broke the club’s transfer record in the summer of 1993 by paying Yorkshire rivals Sheffield United £2.7 million for Brian Deane’s services. There was a slow start with a heavy 4-0 loss to Norwich City among the low points. However, Leeds recovered and finished in a much-improved fifth place at the end of the season, only one point shy of qualifying for continental competition. Rod Wallace scored 17 goals but championship-winning player David Batty did depart during the season for Blackburn Rovers.

 

1994-1995

Consistency was a strong element of Leeds’ 1994-1995 campaign. They never dropped outside the top eight from the second match of the season. They did inflict a rare loss on Manchester United at Elland Road in September but goalscoring was a problem for Wilkinson’s side. Although there was initial promise from youngster Noel Whelan, it was the January signing Ghanaian striker Tony Yeboah from Eintracht Frankfurt that breathed new life into an unremarkable but solid side. Yeboah ended as top scorer with 12 goals and nine wins from their last 13 games ensured a second successive finish in fifth place.

 

1995-1996

Leeds made a fantastic start to the 1995-1996 season, winning their first three matches with Yeboah in stunning shooting form. He was forming his own Goal of the Season shortlist, with spectacular goals in victories over Liverpool FC, Wimbledon and Sheffield Wednesday. When his goal beat Chelsea on 18th November, Leeds sat fifth in the table but their season nosedived after this result. A run of six successive defeats following a League Cup final defeat at the hands of Aston Villa ensured a disappointing 13th place finish – well below the club’s lofty expectations.

 

1996-1997

It was the end of an era at Leeds United on 10th September 1996 as the club elected to sack their 1992 championship-winning manager Howard Wilkinson. Despite winning two of their first five league matches, a demoralising 4-0 home defeat to Manchester United spelt the end of Wilkinson’s successful reign at Elland Road. George Graham returned to management after a one-year suspension and made Leeds tough to beat. However, they scored just 28 goals in 38 matches, finishing with the worst goalscoring total in the Premier League. Nevertheless, Leeds kept a staggering 20 clean sheets and finished in 11th place with a better defensive record than champions Manchester United.

 

1997-1998

After two frustrating seasons, Leeds returned to the Premier League’s top five as George Graham secured UEFA Cup qualification. Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink arrived in pre-season and finished as the club’s top goalscorer with 16 goals. There was a 1-0 win over Manchester United in September and resounding home victories against Newcastle United (4-1) and Blackburn Rovers (4-0). The foundations had been put in place for a successful few seasons for the Leeds faithful.

 

1998-1999

Unbeaten in their opening seven matches, the club were stunned in early October when George Graham walked out to move back to north London, filling the vacancy at Tottenham Hotspur. When no.1 target Martin O’Neill elected to stay at Leicester City, it was Graham’s former assistant, David O’Leary who was appointed as his successor. It was a young squad but O’Leary achieved great things. They strung together a seven-game winning sequence to match a record set by Don Revie’s all-conquering side of the 1970s and Leeds finished in fourth place. Hasselbaink shared the Golden Boot with Michael Owen and Dwight Yorke, scoring 18 times.

 

1999-2000

The 1999-2000 Premier League season was the most competitive for Leeds United. They launched a serious title challenge to Manchester United, topping the table at the end of 1999. Their youthful side really sparkled with Harry Kewell winning the PFA Young Player of the Year and Michael Bridges scoring 19 goals in his first season wearing Leeds colours.

A 1-0 loss to Manchester United at Elland Road in mid-February effectively ended their challenge and inexperience did catch up on them, ultimately finishing 22 points adrift of the champions from Old Trafford. Tragedy also shook the club to the core when two Leeds supporters were stabbed to death on the streets of Istanbul just hours before their UEFA Cup semi-final with Galatasaray.

There was a silver lining though. A goalless draw on the final day at Upton Park secured UEFA Champions League football for the following campaign with a 3rd place finish.

 

2000-2001

In Europe, Leeds United really made a statement of intent by reaching the semi-finals of the UEFA Champions League. They beat the likes of Lazio, Deportivo La Coruna and AC Milan along the way before bowing out over two legs to Valencia. David O’Leary had now become one of the game’s most in-demand managers.

Initially, the demands of UCL action meant an inconsistent start to the Premier League season and Leeds even went into 2001 in the bottom half of the table. They rallied in the second half of the campaign but were edged into fourth place on the final day by treble cup winners, Liverpool FC.

Leeds broke the British transfer record for a defender during the season, spending £18 million on Rio Ferdinand in November 2000 but their failure to qualify for Europe’s premier club competition for a second successive season would start to have a worrying impact on their future finances.

 

2001-2002

Leeds launched another strong push for the championship in 2001-2002. They were part of a five-club battle for the summit, together with Newcastle United, Liverpool FC, Arsenal and Manchester United. Tough-tackling midfielder Seth Johnson and goalscoring hotshot Robbie Fowler were added to the squad during the season for a combined fee of £18 million.

O’Leary had plenty of options and a 3-0 victory over West Ham United on New Years’ Day took Leeds to the top of the table. However, a seven-game winless sequence followed which included defeats to Liverpool and Newcastle along with a shock FA Cup exit at Division Two side Cardiff City knocked the stuffing out of their season. Leeds eventually finished in fifth place.

Chairman Peter Risdale decided the manager was to blame and sacked O’Leary in June, with no silverware and no Champions League football either. He was now aware of a huge hole in the club’s finances.

 

2002-2003

By now, Leeds’ debts were racking up and were being noted in the public eye. Many star players were now being sold to balance the books. Manchester United signed Rio Ferdinand for £30 million, Robbie Keane was sold to Tottenham Hotspur and Robbie Fowler joined Manchester City in the January transfer window.

Terry Venables succeeded O’Leary as manager and despite winning four of their first six games; Leeds struggled all campaign and were closer to the relegation zone for much of the season. Venables quit in March, not fancying a tussle at the bottom and it was Peter Reid who steered them to the end of the season. A 3-2 victory at Arsenal on the penultimate weekend secured their Premier League safety but a 15th place finish was not what anyone wanted. Worse was to come though.

 

2003-2004

Debts had now reached the £100 million mark and Harry Kewell was the next star to leave, with the Australian joining Liverpool FC. Leeds collected just eight points from their first 12 games and after a 6-1 humbling at newly-promoted Portsmouth in November, Peter Reid was sacked.

Former player Eddie Gray was handed the poisoned chalice and Leeds did record a draw with Chelsea plus victories against Charlton Athletic and Fulham. However, a terrible run of seven successive defeats which started with a 3-1 loss at Wolverhampton Wanderers ended any realistic hopes of staying in the Premier League.

On Sunday 2nd May, Leeds’ 14-year stay in the top-flight ended with a 4-1 loss to Bolton Wanderers. More stars left in the off-season including Paul Robinson, Alan Smith and Mark Viduka. Finances have improved since but apart from one play-off final defeat in 2006, Leeds have remained a club in the mid-table reaches of the Championship.

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