Leicester City

Updated upto the end of the 2018-2019 Premier League season

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
498 157 136 205 623 718 -95 607 13

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Muzzy Izzet 222
Matt Elliott 199
Jamie Vardy 176
Robbie Savage 172
Kasper Schmeichel 163
Steve Guppy 161
Wes Morgan 156
Neil Lennon 155
Marc Albrighton 150
Riyad Mahrez 139

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Jamie Vardy 80
Riyad Mahrez 39
Emile Heskey 33
Muzzy Izzet 33
Tony Cottee 27
Matt Elliott 22
Ian Marshall 18
Leonardo Ulloa 18
Paul Dickov 15
Shinji Okazaki 14

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Leicester City 5-1 Queens Park Rangers 24th May 2015 2014-2015
Derby County 0-4 Leicester City 26th April 1998 1997-1998
Leicester City 4-0 Leeds United 15th September 2003 2003-2004
Leicester City 4-0 Swansea City 24th April 2016 2015-2016
Leicester City 5-2 Sunderland 5th March 2000 1999-2000
Southampton 1-4 Leicester City 13th December 2017 2017-2018
West Bromwich Albion 1-4 Leicester City 10th March 2018 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-4 Leicester City 6th April 2019 2018-2019
Leicester City 3-0 Tottenham Hotspur 13th September 1997 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 0-3 Leicester City 11th April 1998 1997-1998

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 6-1 Leicester City 26th December 2000 2000-2001
Leicester City 1-6 Tottenham Hotspur 18th May 2017 2016-2017
Arsenal 5-0 Leicester City 20th February 1999 1998-1999
Leicester City 0-5 Bolton Wanderers 18th August 2001 2001-2002
Leicester City 0-5 Aston Villa 31st January 2004 2003-2004
Crystal Palace 5-0 Leicester City 28th April 2018 2017-2018
Leicester City 2-6 Manchester United 16th January 1999 1998-1999
Manchester City 5-1 Leicester City 10th February 2018 2017-2018
Chelsea 4-0 Leicester City 8th October 1994 1994-1995
Leicester City 0-4 Manchester United 15th April 1995 1994-1995

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Brian Little 1 22nd November 1994
Mark McGhee 1 7th December 1995
Martin O’Neill 4 1st June 2000
Peter Taylor 2 30th September 2001
Dave Bassett 1 6th April 2002
Micky Adams 2 10th October 2004
Nigel Pearson 1 30th June 2015
Claudio Ranieri 2 23rd February 2017
Craig Shakespeare 2 17th October 2017
Claude Puel 2 24th February 2019
Brendan Rodgers 1

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Leicester City 4-2 Sunderland 8th August 2015 32,242 2015-2016
Leicester City 2-2 Manchester United 23rd December 2017 32,202 2017-2018
Leicester City 0-0 Burnley 10th November 2018 32,184 2018-2019
Leicester City 1-2 Liverpool FC 1st September 2018 32,149 2018-2019
Leicester City 1-1 Newcastle United 26th December 2003 32,148 2003-2004
Leicester City 0-1 Manchester United 3rd February 2019 32,148 2018-2019
Leicester City 3-1 Everton 7th May 2016 32,140 2015-2016
Leicester City 2-0 Liverpool FC 2nd February 2016 32,121 2015-2016
Leicester City 1-1 Manchester United 28th November 2015 32,115 2015-2016
Leicester City 1-0 Norwich City 27th February 2016 32,114 2015-2016

 

Intro

In 2015-2016, Leicester City produced the greatest story the Premier League has ever seen. The 5000-1 bookies outsiders for the title produced a fairytale, landing their first-ever English top-flight title. Before this, the Foxes had experienced relegation three times in the Premier League and only narrowly avoided another drop in 2014-2015 due to an incredible run-in under Nigel Pearson’s guidance. They are now a regular top 10 club and are managed by the former Swansea City and Liverpool FC boss, Brendan Rodgers.

 

1994-1995

It was third time lucky for Leicester City in the play-offs, achieving promotion for the first time to the Premier League elite in 1994. Brian Little was their manager but the going was very tough. Leicester won just twice before Little departed in mid-November to take the reins at his former club, Aston Villa. Mark McGhee took over but had little chance of pulling off a miracle and the Foxes became the first team to be relegated in mid-April, finishing 21st out of 22 teams.

 

1996-1997

Martin O’Neill guided Leicester back into the Premier League at the first attempt after more play-off glory and 1996-1997 would be a triumphant return for Leicester. They finished in a superb ninth place and won the League Cup, beating Middlesbrough in a replay 1-0 in the final thanks to a goal from Steve Claridge. This was also the season where Emile Heskey started to make his breakthrough on the Premier League with 10 goals.

 

1997-1998

Leicester enjoyed another solid season under Martin O’Neill’s guidance. He won the Manager of the Month award in September for his early season achievements which included a stirring fightback to draw 3-3 with Arsenal, having been 2-0 down with only five minutes to go. One of the club’s most eye-catching results came towards the end of the season with a 4-0 away victory at Derby County. Leicester finished the season in 10th place.

 

1998-1999

For the third successive campaign, Leicester achieved a top half finish and it was 10th again. Despite being heavily linked with the Leeds United vacancy in October, O’Neill stayed loyal to the club and signed a new contract. It turned into a fairly uneventful campaign for the supporters but the foundations had been laid and the club from Filbert Street were now seen as a stable mid-table top-flight side.

 

1999-2000

Leicester City surpassed their ninth place finish of 1997, going one better to record an eighth place finish in the table in 1999-2000. There was more joy in the League Cup with a second final victory in four years, as plucky First Division outfit Tranmere Rovers were seen off 2-1. Leicester also took a gamble on Stan Collymore in February and he repaid the faith with a hat-trick in a 5-2 victory over Sunderland. However, he suffered a horrible injury a month later in a defeat at Derby and Emile Heskey’s departure for £11 million to Liverpool FC convinced Martin O’Neill to move on. He went north of the border to manage Celtic at the end of the season.

 

2000-2001

Glenn Hoddle’s former assistant from England duty, Peter Taylor was chosen as Leicester’s new manager and initially, he settled in very quickly. The Foxes stayed unbeaten until mid-October and even enjoyed the October international break on top of the Premier League table. A 2-0 win over Liverpool FC in March took Leicester into fifth place but they finished the campaign dismally. An FA Cup sixth round defeat at home to Wycombe Wanderers was followed by nine defeats in their last 10 games to finish in 13th position. It wouldn’t get any better in the following season for the supporters.

 

2001-2002

Peter Taylor began the season as a man under pressure and it showed. Leicester lost their first two matches by an aggregate of 9-0 to Bolton Wanderers and Arsenal respectively. At the end of September, he lost his job after winning just one of his first eight matches of the campaign.

Dave Bassett was brought in to save the club from relegation but form didn’t improve. Leicester spent Christmas Day bottom of the table and relegation was confirmed following a 1-0 home defeat to Manchester United in early April. Bassett moved upstairs and was replaced by his assistant manager, Micky Adams.

2001-2002 was also the final season of football to be played at Filbert Street. They signed off with a 2-1 final day win over Tottenham Hotspur before moving into their new ground which was initially called The Walkers’ Stadium.

 

2003-2004

Runners-up to Portsmouth in the 2002-2003 First Division, Leicester City bounced back to the Premier League at the first attempt but were destined to struggle all campaign on their return. There was an early season 4-0 thumping of Leeds United in September and three wins in November took them as high as 12th. However, after a last-minute equaliser from Craig Hignett to draw 1-1 with Arsenal, the Foxes failed to win any of their next 12 matches.

In March, eight players were arrested after being accused of sexual assault on three German women during a training camp in La Manga. Three players, Keith Gillespie, Paul Dickov and Frank Sinclair were all charged but the case was later dropped.

Leicester did win at Birmingham a few days after this incident went public but relegation back to the second-tier was confirmed by a 2-2 draw at Charlton Athletic in early May; two weeks before the end of the season.

 

2014-2015

After an absence of 10 seasons, Leicester were back in the top-flight and made a decent start, drawing at home to Everton and Arsenal, then produced a remarkable comeback at home to Manchester United, storming back from 3-1 down to win 5-3 with club-record signing Leonardo Ulloa scoring twice.

However, they spent the bulk of the campaign bottom of the table, winning only two more games between that win over the Red Devils and the end of March. Seven points adrift of safety, Nigel Pearson’s side looked doomed but they produced an incredible run of form, winning seven out of their final nine matches. The remarkable escape from the drop was completed by a goalless draw at Sunderland on the final Saturday of the season. Their escape from relegation is among the best escape acts seen in Premier League history.

 

2015-2016

After some off-field transgressions, Leicester’s Thai owner Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha decided to replace Nigel Pearson with Claudio Ranieri in the managerial hotseat. Quoted 3-1 favourites for relegation and 5000-1 outsiders to win the title, Leicester defied expectations in more ways than one.

They were the final club to taste defeat at the end of September to Arsenal and Jamie Vardy broke the record for scoring in successive Premier League matches (11) against Manchester United in November. Leicester spent Christmas Day top of the table after a 3-2 win over Everton. Riyad Mahrez scored twice at Goodison and the Algerian won the PFA Players’ Player of the Year after an outstanding individual campaign.

Leicester became title favourites in early February when Vardy scored a Goal of the Season contender to defeat Liverpool FC 2-0, and then followed that a few days later with an impressive 3-1 victory away at pre-season favourites Manchester City. The fearless Foxes continued to stun the footballing world with some wonderful displays. In early May, they had the chance to wrap the title up at Old Trafford.

The 1-1 draw with Manchester United delayed the celebrations for 24 hours but Chelsea’s 2-2 draw with title rivals Tottenham Hotspur completed the fairytale story. The 5000-1 outsiders had just completed the impossible dream. Leicester City were the 2015-2016 Premier League champions.

 

2016-2017

It was always going to be a virtually impossible task to repeat the 2015-2016 heroics and the summer departure of imperious midfielder N’Golo Kante to Chelsea didn’t help Claudio Ranieri. Leicester’s away record was abysmal, failing to win away from The King Power Stadium until a 3-2 success in March at West Ham United. They went nearly two months without a Premier League goal and in February 2017 with rumours of player unrest, Ranieri was brutally sacked less than 24 hours after a first leg UEFA Champions League loss to Sevilla.

Ranieri’s assistant Craig Shakespeare was brought in as his replacement and he guided the club to eventual safety. They finished in 12th place which remains the worst title defence from a Premier League championship-winning side.

 

2017-2018

Craig Shakespeare was given the permanent job in the summer but he didn’t last long. Only two wins in his first eight matches saw him fired after an underwhelming 1-1 home draw with West Bromwich Albion in mid-October. He was replaced by former Southampton boss Claude Puel. Puel did inspire a four-game winning sequence early into his reign but Leicester finished in ninth place and a dismal run at the end of the season led to speculation about his long-term future. For the third successive season, Jamie Vardy finished as top scorer, ending with 20 Premier League strikes.

 

2018-2019

Leicester City’s 2018-2019 season was overshadowed by the tragic events that occurred outside The King Power Stadium on Saturday 27th October 2018. Just over an hour after drawing 1-1 with West Ham United, the helicopter belonging to owner Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha crashed shortly after take-off from the pitch. Five people, including Vichai were killed.

Leicester were united in grief with a wealth of floral tributes outside the ground to their owner. They played on a week later with an emotional 1-0 victory at Cardiff and Puel’s strength in such an overwhelming sense of tragedy was widely praised. There was an excellent festive period which brought about victories over Chelsea, Manchester City and Everton but a run of four defeats in six games and an FA Cup exit at League Two side Newport County AFC saw him sacked towards the end of February.

Brendan Rodgers returned to the Premier League after a trophy-laden spell in Scotland with Celtic and steered Leicester to a ninth place finish for the second successive season.

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