Category Archives: The Clubs

The Clubs: Leicester City

Updated upto the end of the 2018-2019 Premier League season

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
498 157 136 205 623 718 -95 607 13

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Muzzy Izzet 222
Matt Elliott 199
Jamie Vardy 176
Robbie Savage 172
Kasper Schmeichel 163
Steve Guppy 161
Wes Morgan 156
Neil Lennon 155
Marc Albrighton 150
Riyad Mahrez 139

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Jamie Vardy 80
Riyad Mahrez 39
Emile Heskey 33
Muzzy Izzet 33
Tony Cottee 27
Matt Elliott 22
Ian Marshall 18
Leonardo Ulloa 18
Paul Dickov 15
Shinji Okazaki 14

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Leicester City 5-1 Queens Park Rangers 24th May 2015 2014-2015
Derby County 0-4 Leicester City 26th April 1998 1997-1998
Leicester City 4-0 Leeds United 15th September 2003 2003-2004
Leicester City 4-0 Swansea City 24th April 2016 2015-2016
Leicester City 5-2 Sunderland 5th March 2000 1999-2000
Southampton 1-4 Leicester City 13th December 2017 2017-2018
West Bromwich Albion 1-4 Leicester City 10th March 2018 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-4 Leicester City 6th April 2019 2018-2019
Leicester City 3-0 Tottenham Hotspur 13th September 1997 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 0-3 Leicester City 11th April 1998 1997-1998

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 6-1 Leicester City 26th December 2000 2000-2001
Leicester City 1-6 Tottenham Hotspur 18th May 2017 2016-2017
Arsenal 5-0 Leicester City 20th February 1999 1998-1999
Leicester City 0-5 Bolton Wanderers 18th August 2001 2001-2002
Leicester City 0-5 Aston Villa 31st January 2004 2003-2004
Crystal Palace 5-0 Leicester City 28th April 2018 2017-2018
Leicester City 2-6 Manchester United 16th January 1999 1998-1999
Manchester City 5-1 Leicester City 10th February 2018 2017-2018
Chelsea 4-0 Leicester City 8th October 1994 1994-1995
Leicester City 0-4 Manchester United 15th April 1995 1994-1995

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Brian Little 1 22nd November 1994
Mark McGhee 1 7th December 1995
Martin O’Neill 4 1st June 2000
Peter Taylor 2 30th September 2001
Dave Bassett 1 6th April 2002
Micky Adams 2 10th October 2004
Nigel Pearson 1 30th June 2015
Claudio Ranieri 2 23rd February 2017
Craig Shakespeare 2 17th October 2017
Claude Puel 2 24th February 2019
Brendan Rodgers 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Leicester City 4-2 Sunderland 8th August 2015 32,242 2015-2016
Leicester City 2-2 Manchester United 23rd December 2017 32,202 2017-2018
Leicester City 0-0 Burnley 10th November 2018 32,184 2018-2019
Leicester City 1-2 Liverpool FC 1st September 2018 32,149 2018-2019
Leicester City 1-1 Newcastle United 26th December 2003 32,148 2003-2004
Leicester City 0-1 Manchester United 3rd February 2019 32,148 2018-2019
Leicester City 3-1 Everton 7th May 2016 32,140 2015-2016
Leicester City 2-0 Liverpool FC 2nd February 2016 32,121 2015-2016
Leicester City 1-1 Manchester United 28th November 2015 32,115 2015-2016
Leicester City 1-0 Norwich City 27th February 2016 32,114 2015-2016

 

Intro

In 2015-2016, Leicester City produced the greatest story the Premier League has ever seen. The 5000-1 bookies outsiders for the title produced a fairytale, landing their first-ever English top-flight title. Before this, the Foxes had experienced relegation three times in the Premier League and only narrowly avoided another drop in 2014-2015 due to an incredible run-in under Nigel Pearson’s guidance. They are now a regular top 10 club and are managed by the former Swansea City and Liverpool FC boss, Brendan Rodgers.

 

1994-1995

It was third time lucky for Leicester City in the play-offs, achieving promotion for the first time to the Premier League elite in 1994. Brian Little was their manager but the going was very tough. Leicester won just twice before Little departed in mid-November to take the reins at his former club, Aston Villa. Mark McGhee took over but had little chance of pulling off a miracle and the Foxes became the first team to be relegated in mid-April, finishing 21st out of 22 teams.

 

1996-1997

Martin O’Neill guided Leicester back into the Premier League at the first attempt after more play-off glory and 1996-1997 would be a triumphant return for Leicester. They finished in a superb ninth place and won the League Cup, beating Middlesbrough in a replay 1-0 in the final thanks to a goal from Steve Claridge. This was also the season where Emile Heskey started to make his breakthrough on the Premier League with 10 goals.

 

1997-1998

Leicester enjoyed another solid season under Martin O’Neill’s guidance. He won the Manager of the Month award in September for his early season achievements which included a stirring fightback to draw 3-3 with Arsenal, having been 2-0 down with only five minutes to go. One of the club’s most eye-catching results came towards the end of the season with a 4-0 away victory at Derby County. Leicester finished the season in 10th place.

 

1998-1999

For the third successive campaign, Leicester achieved a top half finish and it was 10th again. Despite being heavily linked with the Leeds United vacancy in October, O’Neill stayed loyal to the club and signed a new contract. It turned into a fairly uneventful campaign for the supporters but the foundations had been laid and the club from Filbert Street were now seen as a stable mid-table top-flight side.

 

1999-2000

Leicester City surpassed their ninth place finish of 1997, going one better to record an eighth place finish in the table in 1999-2000. There was more joy in the League Cup with a second final victory in four years, as plucky First Division outfit Tranmere Rovers were seen off 2-1. Leicester also took a gamble on Stan Collymore in February and he repaid the faith with a hat-trick in a 5-2 victory over Sunderland. However, he suffered a horrible injury a month later in a defeat at Derby and Emile Heskey’s departure for £11 million to Liverpool FC convinced Martin O’Neill to move on. He went north of the border to manage Celtic at the end of the season.

 

2000-2001

Glenn Hoddle’s former assistant from England duty, Peter Taylor was chosen as Leicester’s new manager and initially, he settled in very quickly. The Foxes stayed unbeaten until mid-October and even enjoyed the October international break on top of the Premier League table. A 2-0 win over Liverpool FC in March took Leicester into fifth place but they finished the campaign dismally. An FA Cup sixth round defeat at home to Wycombe Wanderers was followed by nine defeats in their last 10 games to finish in 13th position. It wouldn’t get any better in the following season for the supporters.

 

2001-2002

Peter Taylor began the season as a man under pressure and it showed. Leicester lost their first two matches by an aggregate of 9-0 to Bolton Wanderers and Arsenal respectively. At the end of September, he lost his job after winning just one of his first eight matches of the campaign.

Dave Bassett was brought in to save the club from relegation but form didn’t improve. Leicester spent Christmas Day bottom of the table and relegation was confirmed following a 1-0 home defeat to Manchester United in early April. Bassett moved upstairs and was replaced by his assistant manager, Micky Adams.

2001-2002 was also the final season of football to be played at Filbert Street. They signed off with a 2-1 final day win over Tottenham Hotspur before moving into their new ground which was initially called The Walkers’ Stadium.

 

2003-2004

Runners-up to Portsmouth in the 2002-2003 First Division, Leicester City bounced back to the Premier League at the first attempt but were destined to struggle all campaign on their return. There was an early season 4-0 thumping of Leeds United in September and three wins in November took them as high as 12th. However, after a last-minute equaliser from Craig Hignett to draw 1-1 with Arsenal, the Foxes failed to win any of their next 12 matches.

In March, eight players were arrested after being accused of sexual assault on three German women during a training camp in La Manga. Three players, Keith Gillespie, Paul Dickov and Frank Sinclair were all charged but the case was later dropped.

Leicester did win at Birmingham a few days after this incident went public but relegation back to the second-tier was confirmed by a 2-2 draw at Charlton Athletic in early May; two weeks before the end of the season.

 

2014-2015

After an absence of 10 seasons, Leicester were back in the top-flight and made a decent start, drawing at home to Everton and Arsenal, then produced a remarkable comeback at home to Manchester United, storming back from 3-1 down to win 5-3 with club-record signing Leonardo Ulloa scoring twice.

However, they spent the bulk of the campaign bottom of the table, winning only two more games between that win over the Red Devils and the end of March. Seven points adrift of safety, Nigel Pearson’s side looked doomed but they produced an incredible run of form, winning seven out of their final nine matches. The remarkable escape from the drop was completed by a goalless draw at Sunderland on the final Saturday of the season. Their escape from relegation is among the best escape acts seen in Premier League history.

 

2015-2016

After some off-field transgressions, Leicester’s Thai owner Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha decided to replace Nigel Pearson with Claudio Ranieri in the managerial hotseat. Quoted 3-1 favourites for relegation and 5000-1 outsiders to win the title, Leicester defied expectations in more ways than one.

They were the final club to taste defeat at the end of September to Arsenal and Jamie Vardy broke the record for scoring in successive Premier League matches (11) against Manchester United in November. Leicester spent Christmas Day top of the table after a 3-2 win over Everton. Riyad Mahrez scored twice at Goodison and the Algerian won the PFA Players’ Player of the Year after an outstanding individual campaign.

Leicester became title favourites in early February when Vardy scored a Goal of the Season contender to defeat Liverpool FC 2-0, and then followed that a few days later with an impressive 3-1 victory away at pre-season favourites Manchester City. The fearless Foxes continued to stun the footballing world with some wonderful displays. In early May, they had the chance to wrap the title up at Old Trafford.

The 1-1 draw with Manchester United delayed the celebrations for 24 hours but Chelsea’s 2-2 draw with title rivals Tottenham Hotspur completed the fairytale story. The 5000-1 outsiders had just completed the impossible dream. Leicester City were the 2015-2016 Premier League champions.

 

2016-2017

It was always going to be a virtually impossible task to repeat the 2015-2016 heroics and the summer departure of imperious midfielder N’Golo Kante to Chelsea didn’t help Claudio Ranieri. Leicester’s away record was abysmal, failing to win away from The King Power Stadium until a 3-2 success in March at West Ham United. They went nearly two months without a Premier League goal and in February 2017 with rumours of player unrest, Ranieri was brutally sacked less than 24 hours after a first leg UEFA Champions League loss to Sevilla.

Ranieri’s assistant Craig Shakespeare was brought in as his replacement and he guided the club to eventual safety. They finished in 12th place which remains the worst title defence from a Premier League championship-winning side.

 

2017-2018

Craig Shakespeare was given the permanent job in the summer but he didn’t last long. Only two wins in his first eight matches saw him fired after an underwhelming 1-1 home draw with West Bromwich Albion in mid-October. He was replaced by former Southampton boss Claude Puel. Puel did inspire a four-game winning sequence early into his reign but Leicester finished in ninth place and a dismal run at the end of the season led to speculation about his long-term future. For the third successive season, Jamie Vardy finished as top scorer, ending with 20 Premier League strikes.

 

2018-2019

Leicester City’s 2018-2019 season was overshadowed by the tragic events that occurred outside The King Power Stadium on Saturday 27th October 2018. Just over an hour after drawing 1-1 with West Ham United, the helicopter belonging to owner Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha crashed shortly after take-off from the pitch. Five people, including Vichai were killed.

Leicester were united in grief with a wealth of floral tributes outside the ground to their owner. They played on a week later with an emotional 1-0 victory at Cardiff and Puel’s strength in such an overwhelming sense of tragedy was widely praised. There was an excellent festive period which brought about victories over Chelsea, Manchester City and Everton but a run of four defeats in six games and an FA Cup exit at League Two side Newport County AFC saw him sacked towards the end of February.

Brendan Rodgers returned to the Premier League after a trophy-laden spell in Scotland with Celtic and steered Leicester to a ninth place finish for the second successive season.

Advertisements

The Clubs: Burnley

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
190 51 44 95 190 297 -107 197 5

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Ashley Barnes 136
Ben Mee 134
Sam Vokes 102
Jeff Hendrick 98
Tom Heaton 96
Scott Arfield 86
Jack Cork 86
James Tarkowski 85
Johann Berg Gudmundsson 84
Matthew Lowton 83

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Ashley Barnes 32
Chris Wood 20
Sam Vokes 17
Danny Ings 11
Andre Gray 9
Steven Defour 8
Graham Alexander 7
George Boyd 7
Jeff Hendrick 7
Johann Berg Gudmundsson 6

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Burnley 4-0 AFC Bournemouth 22nd September 2018 2018-2019
Hull City 1-4 Burnley 10th April 2010 2009-2010
Burnley 4-1 Sunderland 31st December 2016 2016-2017
West Ham United 0-3 Burnley 10th March 2018 2017-2018
Burnley 4-2 Tottenham Hotspur 9th May 2010 2009-2010
Burnley 3-1 Sunderland 19th September 2009 2009-2010
Brighton & Hove Albion 1-3 Burnley 9th February 2019 2018-2019
AFC Bournemouth 1-3 Burnley 6th April 2019 2018-2019
Burnley 2-0 Hull City 31st October 2009 2009-2010
Burnley 2-0 Liverpool FC 20th August 2016 2016-2017

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Burnley 1-6 Manchester City 3rd April 2010 2009-2010
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 Burnley 26th September 2009 2009-2010
Arsenal 5-0 Burnley 6th May 2018 2017-2018
Manchester City 5-0 Burnley 20th October 2018 2018-2019
Burnley 1-5 Everton 26th December 2018 2018-2019
Liverpool FC 4-0 Burnley 12th September 2009 2009-2010
Burnley 0-4 Liverpool FC 25th April 2010 2009-2010
West Bromwich Albion 4-0 Burnley 28th September 2014 2014-2015
West Bromwich Albion 4-0 Burnley 21st November 2016 2016-2017
Burnley 0-4 Chelsea 28th October 2018 2018-2019

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Owen Coyle 1 8th January 2010
Brian Laws 1 29th December 2010
Sean Dyche 4  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Burnley 0-2 Manchester United 23rd April 2017 21,870 2016-2017
Burnley 0-1 Manchester United 20th January 2018 21,841 2017-2018
Burnley 1-2 Manchester City 26th November 2016 21,794 2016-2017
Burnley 1-1 Bolton Wanderers 26th December 2009 21,761 2009-2010
Burnley 1-2 Liverpool FC 1st January 2018 21,756 2017-2018
Burnley 1-1 Chelsea 12th February 2017 21,744 2016-2017
Burnley 1-3 Liverpool FC 5th December 2018 21,741 2018-2019
Burnley 2-1 Leicester City 14th April 2018 21,727 2017-2018
Burnley 0-1 Arsenal 26th November 2017 21,722 2017-2018
Burnley 0-2 Tottenham Hotspur 1st April 2017 21,684 2016-2017

 

Intro

Fans of Burnley have experienced plenty of high moments in the last decade. Although they do have two Premier League relegations on their CV, the Clarets can look forward to a fourth consecutive season of Premier League football next season under the guidance of Sean Dyche – one of the best English managers at the moment. Burnley made their Premier League debut in 2009 and achieved a sensational finishing position of seventh in 2017-2018 – best of the rest after the current ‘Big 6.’

 

2009-2010

Having beaten Sheffield United in the Championship play-off final in the previous campaign, Burnley were expected to struggle in their first season at this level. However, they made Turf Moor an early fortress, collecting five wins in their first six home games. Reigning champions Manchester United were beaten in only their second Premier League game with Robbie Blake scoring a stunning winner. Everton and Sunderland were also among their early season victims.

Owen Coyle started the season as manager but in January, he acrimoniously left to take the manager’s job at fellow Lancastrian side Bolton Wanderers. The ex-Sheffield Wednesday boss Brian Laws succeeded him but Burnley’s form nosedived in the second half of the season. Relegation was confirmed in their 36th match of the season after a 4-0 home defeat to Liverpool FC but they did finish above Hull in 18th position after a 4-2 final day victory over Tottenham Hotspur.

 

2014-2015

Four years after their last taste of Premier League action, Burnley were back in the top-flight and Sean Dyche was now at the helm. His astute management of the club’s resources has put Burnley in a much better position, even if this season ended in instant relegation back to the Championship.

The Clarets didn’t enjoy victory until beating Hull City 1-0 in November but the goals of Danny Ings saw them never cut-off from the other struggling sides and the highlight of their campaign was undoubtedly George Boyd’s winner to defeat Manchester City 1-0 in March. Their relegation was confirmed in May despite completing a league double over Hull and Ings left at the end of the season for Liverpool FC.

 

2016-2017

Burnley returned to the Premier League after just a single season away and were stronger for their previous experiences. An early season victory over Liverpool FC suggested they would be harder to beat this time around. Like in their previous campaigns, Burnley’s strong platform for success was based around their home form and they were tough to beat with Crystal Palace, Southampton and AFC Bournemouth among the sides who came away empty-handed from their visits to Lancashire.

It was a different story away from home with just one victory on their travels but that success in late April at Selhurst Park meant the club avoided relegation for the first time, finishing the campaign in a rewarding 16th position.

 

2017-2018

With Joey Barton released after his ban for breaching betting rules and Andre Gray sold to Watford, questions were raised over whether Burnley had a strong enough squad to compete in the Premier League. Those doubts were quashed immediately on the opening weekend as Dyche’s side raced into a 3-0 half-time lead at Stamford Bridge and held on against nine-man Chelsea to beat them 3-2.

In December, the Clarets sat in the dizzy heights of fourth position briefly and a European adventure looked more likely. Not even an 11-game winless run could derail those lofty ambitions and a 2-1 win against Everton in early March began a five-game winning sequence which was good enough to secure seventh place and a place in the qualifying stages of the following season’s UEFA Europa League. Only the ‘Big 6’ finished above Burnley which was a heroic achievement from everyone at the club.

 

2018-2019

Burnley’s European aspirations ended in the play-off round of the UEFA Europa League as they lost to Olympiacos and the early start had a detrimental effect on their form in the Premier League. The tight defence from the previous campaign seemed to evaporate and by Christmas, Burnley had conceded more goals in the whole of the 2018-2019 campaign than what they’d let in the previous season. The low point was a 5-1 demolition on home soil by Everton on Boxing Day.

The return of captain Tom Heaton shortly afterwards and a change in tactical approach after this drubbing by the Toffees paid off. Burnley started to become harder to beat again. A seven-game unbeaten sequence which culminated with a 2-1 triumph over UEFA Champions League finalists Tottenham Hotspur had them going in the right direction. Safety was secured effectively by a 2-2 draw at Chelsea with Ashley Barnes and Chris Wood forming a dangerous partnership in-attack. Burnley ultimately ended the 2018-2019 season in 15th place.

The Clubs: Sheffield Wednesday

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
316 101 89 126 409 453 -44 392 8

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Des Walker 264
Peter Atherton 214
Kevin Pressman 207
Ian Nolan 165
Graham Hyde 159
Mark Bright 133
Andy Booth 115
Guy Whittingham 114
Chris Bart-Williams 109
Chris Waddle 108

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Mark Bright 49
David Hirst 33
Andy Booth 25
Benito Carbone 25
Guy Whittingham 22
Chris Bart-Williams 16
Paolo Di Canio 15
Gordon Watson 15
Mark Pembridge 12
Graham Hyde 11

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 West Ham United 18th December 1993 1993-1994
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 Ipswich Town 23rd April 1994 1993-1994
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 Bolton Wanderers 8th November 1997 1997-1998
Sheffield Wednesday 6-2 Leeds United 16th December 1995 1995-1996
Sheffield Wednesday 5-1 Everton 2nd April 1994 1993-1994
Sheffield Wednesday 5-1 Coventry City 28th December 1994 1994-1995
Sheffield Wednesday 5-1 Wimbledon 2nd October 1999 1999-2000
West Ham United 0-4 Sheffield Wednesday 16th January 1999 1998-1999
Sheffield Wednesday 4-0 Leicester City 14th May 2000 1999-2000
Sheffield Wednesday 5-2 Southampton 12th April 1993 1992-1993

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Newcastle United 8-0 Sheffield Wednesday 19th September 1999 1999-2000
Sheffield Wednesday 1-7 Nottingham Forest 1st April 1995 1994-1995
Blackburn Rovers 7-2 Sheffield Wednesday 25th August 1997 1997-1998
Manchester United 6-1 Sheffield Wednesday 1st November 1997 1997-1998
Manchester United 5-0 Sheffield Wednesday 16th March 1994 1993-1994
West Ham United 5-1 Sheffield Wednesday 3rd May 1997 1996-1997
Middlesbrough 4-0 Sheffield Wednesday 3rd October 1998 1998-1999
Manchester United 4-0 Sheffield Wednesday 11th August 1999 1999-2000
Sheffield Wednesday 2-5 Everton 27th April 1996 1995-1996
Sheffield Wednesday 2-5 Derby County 24th September 1997 1997-1998

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Trevor Francis 3 20th May 1995
David Pleat 3 3rd November 1997
Ron Atkinson 1 30th June 1998
Danny Wilson 2 21st March 2000
Peter Shreeves 1 21st June 2000

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Sheffield Wednesday 0-1 Manchester United 2nd February 2000 39,640 1999-2000
Sheffield Wednesday 3-1 Manchester United 21st November 1998 39,475 1998-1999
Sheffield Wednesday 2-0 Manchester United 7th March 1998 39,427 1997-1998
Sheffield Wednesday 1-1 Liverpool FC 11th May 1997 38,943 1996-1997
Sheffield Wednesday 1-1 Sheffield United 21st April 1993 38,688 1992-1993
Sheffield Wednesday 3-3 Manchester United 26th December 1992 37,708 1992-1993
Sheffield Wednesday 1-1 Manchester United 18th December 1996 37,671 1996-1997
Sheffield Wednesday 3-3 Liverpool FC 14th February 1998 35,405 1997-1998
Sheffield Wednesday 3-1 Sheffield United 22nd January 1994 34,959 1993-1994
Sheffield Wednesday 1-2 Liverpool FC 7th August 1999 34,853 1999-2000

 

Intro

Sheffield Wednesday have been absent from the Premier League for almost two decades. In their heyday, the Owls were considered as one of the biggest clubs in England and under the guidance of Trevor Francis, they played some enterprising football, resulting in back-to-back seventh place finishes in the first two Premier League seasons. Another seventh place finish was recorded by David Pleat in 1997 but after a few years of struggle, the club were relegated in 2000 after a difficult season at Hillsborough.

 

1992-1993

Sheffield Wednesday had finished the last campaign of the old First Division in third place so hopes and expectations were high going into the first Premier League season. Manager Trevor Francis had brought Chris Waddle back to England after his spell in French football with Marseille and Waddle’s response was to put in some spellbinding individual performances on his way to landing the Football Writers’ award. Mark Bright was another new arrival, joining a few weeks into the campaign from Crystal Palace, whilst the talented David Hirst saw a move to Manchester United blocked by the manager.

The Owls made a slow start domestically, winning just one of their first seven matches and were mid-table at Christmas before the best winning sequence of the inaugural Premier League campaign saw them chalk up seven successive victories and move into fourth by the end of February. They eventually finished seventh and reached both domestic cup finals too. There would be heartache though for their supporters as the club were beaten 2-1 in both finals by Arsenal through last minute goals from defenders Steve Morrow and Andy Linighan.

 

1993-1994

Sheffield Wednesday had a habit of making slow starts to campaigns and this continued in 1993-1994. Despite adding England international Andy Sinton to their ranks in August, they were winless in their opening seven fixtures. That included throwing away a three-goal lead to draw 3-3 at home with Norwich City. Francis’ side were exhilarating to watch and their tally of 76 goals was one of the best in the division. Too many draws though meant they wound up seventh for the second successive campaign. Mark Bright was top scorer with 19 goals and youngster Gordon Watson made an impressive breakthrough with 12 goals, largely thanks to injuries which were starting to affect the career of David Hirst.

 

1994-1995

1994-1995 turned out to be an underwhelming campaign for Sheffield Wednesday and their supporters. After their typical sluggish start with just one win in their opening eight fixtures, David Hirst made a brief return from injury to score the only goal to beat reigning champions Manchester United in October. An eight-game unbeaten sequence in winter took the team upto eighth position but a 7-1 home humbling by Nottingham Forest was part of a worrying trend of results that saw the club tumble to 13th by the season’s end. The Owls board decided a change was required in the management and Trevor Francis left after the season concluded. He was replaced by Luton Town manager David Pleat.

 

1995-1996

Belgian Marc Degryse was the biggest capture in the summer by new boss David Pleat but there wasn’t a significant upturn in fortunes. In fact, Sheffield Wednesday could still have been mathematically relegated on the final day of the season before winding up 15th. December was the peak month of the campaign, with a thrilling 4-3 home victory over fellow strugglers Coventry City and a 6-2 destruction of Yorkshire rivals Leeds United. Degryse turned out to be a major disappointment but David Hirst returned to his best form after two rotten seasons struggling with injuries. Hirst ended as the club’s top scorer with 13 goals.

 

1996-1997

David Pleat forked out a sizeable £2.5 million fee on Huddersfield Town young striker Andy Booth and together with the unheralded Ritchie Humphreys; the pair helped the club make an untypical start. Four successive victories at the season’s start had Sheffield Wednesday sitting top of the table at the start of September. Among their early victims were Newcastle United at St James’ Park and Liverpool FC were also beaten on their own patch by the Owls in early December.

Form did level out after the searing start but they lost just nine games all campaign and finished an excellent seventh, just four points shy of UEFA Cup qualification. Booth top scored with 10 goals in his debut Premier League campaign whilst the early season arrival of playmaker Benito Carbone excited the supporters.

 

1997-1998

Italian forward Paolo Di Canio was tempted by Pleat to join fellow countryman Carbone at Hillsborough but a shocking start to the 1997-1998 season saw the club in the bottom three by the end of October. A 7-2 loss away at Blackburn Rovers was a sign of things to come, especially as Carbone scored twice and then got himself sent off. Losing 6-1 at Old Trafford to a rampant Manchester United in early November was the final straw for owner Dave Richards, who sacked Pleat and managed to tempt Ron Atkinson back to Hillsborough, six years after his acrimonious departure for Aston Villa.

Big Ron gave the side an immediate boost with three successive victories including a 2-0 home win over eventual champions Arsenal. Safety was secured in 16th spot but Atkinson’s contract was not renewed and former player Danny Wilson left Barnsley at the end of the season to take up the vacancy.

 

1998-1999

Sheffield Wednesday finished in 12th position in Danny Wilson’s first full season at the helm. It was a dramatic campaign for the club. In September, Paolo Di Canio was sent off against Arsenal and shoved referee Paul Alcock to the ground. He was fined £10,000, banned for 11 matches and never played for the club again. They were the only side to enjoy victory over both Manchester United and Arsenal but 18 defeats left them in mid-table and nowhere near the European qualifying positions.

 

1999-2000

One point from nine matches at the start of the season mounted the pressure onto Danny Wilson as it was the worst-ever beginning to a Premier League campaign. This included an 8-0 battering away at Newcastle United in mid-September. Carbone quit the club for Aston Villa and with only two victories in their first 19 fixtures, Sheffield Wednesday sat bottom going into the year 2000.

There was a minor improvement in form in the New Year despite local MPs calling for Wilson to go. Eventually, the board agreed in March, terminating his contract after a desperate away defeat to bottom club Watford. Peter Shreeves became caretaker and although there were victories over Wimbledon and Chelsea in April, the club had too much to do and relegation was confirmed in the final week of the season after a 3-3 draw at Highbury with Arsenal.

Sheffield Wednesday have missed out on promotion a couple of times via the Championship play-offs since and will be hoping to end their drought in the near future without top-flight football under the guidance of former Birmingham City and Hull City boss Steve Bruce.

The Clubs: Wigan Athletic

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
304 85 76 143 316 482 -166 331 8

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Emmerson Boyce 194
Maynor Figueroa 179
Paul Scharner 159
Chris Kirkland 131
James McCarthy 115
Hugo Rodallega 111
Ali Al-Habsi 101
Gary Caldwell 101
Mario Melchiot 97
Titus Bramble 96

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Hugo Rodallega 24
Henri Camara 20
Emile Heskey 16
Charles N’Zogbia 15
Paul Scharner 14
Franco Di Santo 13
Emmerson Boyce 11
Arouna Kone 11
Jordi Gomez 10
Lee McCulloch 10

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Hull City 0-5 Wigan Athletic 30th August 2008 2008-2009
Wigan Athletic 4-0 Manchester City 21st October 2006 2006-2007
Wigan Athletic 4-0 Newcastle United 28th April 2012 2011-2012
Wigan Athletic 3-0 Charlton Athletic 17th December 2005 2005-2006
Wigan Athletic 3-0 Sunderland 18th August 2007 2007-2008
Wigan Athletic 3-0 Blackburn Rovers 13th December 2008 2008-2009
Aston Villa 0-3 Wigan Athletic 29th December 2012 2012-2013
Reading 0-3 Wigan Athletic 23rd February 2013 2012-2013
Wigan Athletic 5-3 Blackburn Rovers 15th December 2007 2007-2008
Wigan Athletic 3-1 Chelsea 26th September 2009 2009-2010

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Tottenham Hotspur 9-1 Wigan Athletic 22nd November 2009 2009-2010
Chelsea 8-0 Wigan Athletic 9th May 2010 2009-2010
Wigan Athletic 0-6 Chelsea 21st August 2010 2010-2011
Wigan Athletic 0-5 Manchester United 22nd August 2009 2009-2010
Manchester United 5-0 Wigan Athletic 30th December 2009 2009-2010
Manchester United 5-0 Wigan Athletic 26th December 2011 2011-2012
Manchester United 4-0 Wigan Athletic 14th December 2005 2005-2006
Wigan Athletic 0-4 Liverpool FC 2nd December 2006 2006-2007
Chelsea 4-0 Wigan Athletic 13th January 2007 2006-2007
Manchester United 4-0 Wigan Athletic 6th October 2007 2007-2008

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Paul Jewell 2 14th May 2007
Chris Hutchings 1 5th November 2007
Steve Bruce 2 30th June 2009
Roberto Martinez 4 28th May 2013

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Wigan Athletic 0-2 Manchester United 11th May 2008 25,133 2007-2008
Wigan Athletic 0-1 Liverpool FC 11th February 2006 25,023 2005-2006
Wigan Athletic 4-3 Manchester City 26th December 2005 25,017 2005-2006
Wigan Athletic 2-3 Arsenal 19th November 2005 25,004 2005-2006
Wigan Athletic 0-3 West Ham United 28th April 2007 24,726 2006-2007
Wigan Athletic 0-1 Liverpool FC 29th September 2007 24,311 2007-2008
Wigan Athletic 0-1 Chelsea 14th August 2005 23,575 2005-2006
Wigan Athletic 1-2 Manchester United 6th March 2006 23,574 2005-2006
Wigan Athletic 2-2 Aston Villa 19th May 2013 23,001 2012-2013
Wigan Athletic 1-4 Arsenal 11th April 2009 22,954 2008-2009

 

Intro

Wigan Athletic’s journey in the Premier League was exciting and enjoyable for their supporters. Their maiden campaign saw them as high as second in November 2005 before finishing 10th which turned out to be their highest top-flight finish. The Latics had a knack of pulling off heroic escapes and dramatic turnarounds in the Spring period having looked cast adrift at winter time. Their luck eventually ran out in 2013 but not before the supporters could enjoy a shock FA Cup final victory over Manchester City.

 

2005-2006

It was Paul Jewell who took Wigan Athletic into the Premier League and he masterminded a memorable debut campaign for them in the top-flight. After losing cruelly 1-0 on the opening weekend to reigning champions Chelsea, Wigan went on a marvellous run of eight wins in nine matches to take them into second spot in mid-November. Their form did eventually take a dip but Wigan remained in the top half all season, finishing a brilliant 10th with the likes of Henri Camara, Jimmy Bullard and Pascal Chimbonda impressing greatly.

 

2006-2007

With Chimbonda moving to Tottenham Hotspur and Bullard going to Fulham, it was always going to be a tougher second season in the Premier League for Wigan Athletic and so it proved. There were impressive performances from left-back Leighton Baines and summer signing Emile Heskey, who scored nine league goals but apart from a four-game winning sequence in late October and early November, Wigan’s form was iffy all season.

Going into the final day, they had to win at Bramwall Lane against Sheffield United or face up to relegation. Paul Scharner put the visitors infront and although Jon Stead equalised for Sheffield United, a penalty from January arrival David Unsworth (who had started the season as a Sheffield United player!) was decisive. Wigan’s 2-1 victory kept them up and sent Neil Warnock’s Blades down. Manager Paul Jewell resigned as manager 24 hours after their survival was confirmed.

 

2007-2008

Wigan owner Dave Whelan gave the manager’s job to Chris Hutchings, who had been Jewell’s no.2. He did start with two wins in his first three matches but that was as good as it got for Hutchings. Nine games without a win saw him fired after a home defeat in early November by Chelsea. Whelan began his pursuit of the Birmingham City boss Steve Bruce and was successful, bringing Bruce in towards the end of November.

His first win was a thrilling 5-3 success over Blackburn Rovers where Marcus Bent scored a hat-trick. Bent finished as top scorer despite only being on-loan for the season from relegated Charlton Athletic. Meanwhile, Paul Scharner’s excellence saw him voted as the club’s Player of the Year. Wigan ended up finishing 14th with safety secured by a fine 2-0 away win at Aston Villa on the penultimate weekend of the season.

 

2008-2009

It was a much more comfortable campaign for Wigan Athletic supporters who finished in mid-table in 11th place. Amr Zaki made a blistering start and although his star would fade, he finished as the club’s top goalscorer with 10, which included a blistering bicycle kick in defeat at Anfield. Wigan did reach as high as seventh after defeating Hull City 1-0 in March but a run of six defeats in seven ultimately saw them drop outside of the top 10 by the season’s end.

 

2009-2010

Steve Bruce left Wigan in the summer to take over at Sunderland and he was replaced by former Latics player Roberto Martinez, who had been managing at Swansea City. Martinez began with a brilliant away day victory at Villa Park, whilst there were enjoyable home wins over eventual champions Chelsea and Arsenal.

Maynor Figueroa’s long-range strike from the halfway line away at Stoke in December was voted Goal of the Season and Wigan avoided relegation, finishing in 16th and six points clear of the drop. However, they conceded 79 goals which was the most of any of the sides that survived, not helped by a 9-1 humiliation at Tottenham and an 8-0 loss on the final day at Stamford Bridge against Chelsea.

 

2010-2011

Wigan’s 2010-2011 season began with two heavy home defeats against newly-promoted Blackpool and Chelsea, shipping 10 goals in the process. There was a 1-0 triumph in their next fixture away at Tottenham Hotspur but their form was not good for much of the season and in early April, they were bottom of the division and looking like favourites for relegation. However, they won 3-1 at Blackpool, picked up priceless points against Everton and Aston Villa and pulled off two victories in the last two weeks at home to West Ham United and away at Stoke City to secure survival on the final day of the season.

 

2011-2012

Wigan’s joint-top scorer from the previous season, Charles N’Zogbia was sold to Aston Villa in the summer and it showed. Eight successive defeats in the season’s early weeks had Martinez’s men bottom of the table and set for a long winter. In fact, they remained in the bottom three for much of the campaign and the omens didn’t look good after a 1-1 home draw against West Bromwich Albion in March.

Then, their annual Spring escape began with a 2-1 away win at Anfield and Wigan would win seven of their last nine matches. This included a surprise win at The Emirates, a 4-0 demolition of Champions League qualifying contenders Newcastle United and a 1-0 victory at home to Manchester United. Antolin Alcaraz’s late header at Blackburn in the final week of the campaign secured another top-flight season for the Latics and they finished 15th.

 

2012-2013

Despite interest from Liverpool FC, Roberto Martinez stayed on at Wigan Athletic for what turned out to be another rollercoaster season for the club. As expected, Wigan spent much of the campaign at the wrong end of the table, although they did win away at Tottenham and beat Reading 3-2 where Jordi Gomez scored a hat-trick.

There were signs of another escape from the drop after back-to-back victories in March over Newcastle United and Norwich City but it never quite materialised this time around. A costly 3-2 home defeat to Swansea and a 4-1 defeat away at Arsenal ultimately saw Wigan’s Premier League adventure come to a sad end.

However, the supporters will always remember the FA Cup journey. Wigan blitzed Everton 3-0 in the quarter-finals and beat Millwall in the semis to reach the final at Wembley. No-one gave them a chance against big-spending Manchester City but the Lancastrians had other ideas. They frustrated City and in stoppage-time, Ben Watson popped up to score the winner from a corner to ensure a new name on the famous trophy.

The Clubs: Derby County

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
266 68 70 128 271 420 -149 274 7

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Darryl Powell 170
Jacob Laursen 136
Mart Poom 132
Dean Sturridge 127
Deon Burton 118
Rory Delap 103
Stefano Eranio 95
Malcolm Christie 91
Horacio Carbonari 88
Lee Carsley 80

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Dean Sturridge 32
Malcolm Christie 23
Paulo Wanchope 23
Deon Burton 22
Francesco Baiano 16
Branko Strupar 15
Rory Delap 11
Fabrizio Ravanelli 9
Ashley Ward 9
Horacio Carbonari 8

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Derby County 4-0 Southampton 27th September 1997 1997-1998
Derby County 4-0 Bolton Wanderers 13th April 1998 1997-1998
Derby County 4-0 Wimbledon 4th March 2000 1999-2000
Sheffield Wednesday 2-5 Derby County 24th September 1997 1997-1998
Middlesbrough 1-4 Derby County 15th January 2000 1999-2000
Derby County 3-0 Arsenal 1st November 1997 1997-1998
Derby County 3-0 Sheffield Wednesday 28th February 1998 1997-1998
Derby County 3-0 Leicester City 2nd April 2000 1999-2000
Leicester City 0-3 Derby County 23rd February 2002 2001-2002
Derby County 4-2 Tottenham Hotspur 22nd March 1997 1996-1997

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Liverpool FC 6-0 Derby County 1st September 2007 2007-2008
Derby County 0-6 Aston Villa 12th April 2008 2007-2008
Middlesbrough 6-1 Derby County 5th March 1997 1996-1997
Chelsea 6-1 Derby County 12th March 2008 2007-2008
Derby County 0-5 Leeds United 15th March 1998 1997-1998
Derby County 0-5 Sunderland 18th September 1999 1999-2000
Manchester United 5-0 Derby County 12th December 2001 2001-2002
Arsenal 5-0 Derby County 22nd September 2007 2007-2008
Derby County 0-5 West Ham United 10th November 2007 2007-2008
Derby County 2-6 Arsenal 28th April 2008 2007-2008

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Jim Smith 6 7th October 2001
Colin Todd 1 14th January 2002
John Gregory 1 21st March 2003

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Derby County 0-2 Liverpool FC 18th March 2000 33,378 1999-2000
Derby County 1-2 Manchester United 20th November 1999 33,370 1999-2000
Derby County 3-4 Everton 23rd March 2002 33,297 2001-2002
Derby County 0-1 Liverpool FC 1st December 2001 33,289 2001-2002
Derby County 1-1 Ipswich Town 19th May 2001 33,239 2000-2001
Derby County 0-2 Aston Villa 26th December 1999 33,222 1999-2000
Derby County 0-4 Reading 11th May 2008 33,087 2007-2008
Derby County 0-1 Manchester United 15th March 2008 33,072 2007-2008
Derby County 0-3 Tottenham Hotspur 9th February 2008 33,058 2007-2008
Derby County 0-0 Sunderland 1st March 2008 33,058 2007-2008

 

Intro

Derby County made their Premier League bow in 1996, spending one season at The Baseball Ground before moving into the state-of-the-art Pride Park stadium. The Rams finished in ninth and eighth position in two successive campaigns at the end of the 1990s but were relegated in 2002 after going through a season with three managers. Returning in 2007, they endured a horrible season and went down with the lowest points tally in Premier League history. They are currently in the Championship with ex-Chelsea midfielder Frank Lampard as manager.

 

1996-1997

Having been outside of the top-flight for five seasons, Derby County returned in 1996 and made their Premier League debut, drawing a thrilling opening game 3-3 with Leeds United. The Rams won eight games in their final-ever season at The Baseball Ground but it was an away victory that was their highlight of the season. Paulo Wanchope scored a brilliant goal on his English league debut in a stunning 3-2 victory at Old Trafford over Manchester United. Derby finished in an excellent 12th position.

 

1997-1998

Derby moved into their new stadium Pride Park for the start of the 1997-1998 season but a floodlight failure meant their first game in the ground against Wimbledon had to be abandoned in the second half with the home side leading 2-1. Home victories over Liverpool FC and eventual league champions Arsenal demonstrated they settled quickly into their new surroundings and Jim Smith’s team went on to finish in ninth position, just two points shy of a European qualification place. Wanchope finished as the club’s top scorer with 13 goals.

 

1998-1999

Derby’s excellent form continued in the early weeks of the 1998-1999 campaign, moving into second place after six games following a 2-0 East Midlands Derby victory over Leicester City. Derby enjoyed 13 league victories which was good enough for their best-ever Premier League finishing position of eighth and among the highs of the season was achieving a league double over Liverpool FC. Wanchope was joint-top scorer with Deon Burton as both scored nine goals but there was a departure on the coaching staff as Jim Smith’s no.2, Steve McClaren left in February 1999 to become Sir Alex Ferguson’s new right-hand man at Manchester United.

 

1999-2000

After an encouraging goalless draw on the opening weekend away at Leeds United, Derby’s form nosedived dramatically in the early weeks of 1999-2000. The nadir was a 5-0 home humbling by newly-promoted Sunderland and they went into the new millennium rooted in the bottom three in the table. Jim Smith’s pre-season worries were being realised and 10 home defeats at Pride Park was the root of the problems. The Rams managed just five victories in the second half of the season but 38 points was enough to survive in 16th position. It was a reality shock though for all connected with the club after an impressive first three seasons in the Premier League.

 

2000-2001

Derby’s problems continued throughout the opening months of the 2000-2001 season. They didn’t win any of their first 13 games although they did draw seven of these matches. The fans patience was starting to run out with the manager and they began unfurling banners calling for Jim Smith’s departure after a 4-0 home defeat by Liverpool FC in October.

Their first win didn’t come until a 2-0 defeat of Bradford City on 18th November. Derby were still in relegation trouble until the penultimate weekend when Malcolm Christie’s goal was enough for three points away at Manchester United. The Rams safety was confirmed two days later when Manchester City were relegated after losing 2-1 at Ipswich. This time, Derby ended eight points clear of relegation danger but were 17th at the end of the season.

 

2001-2002

The pre-season arrival of Fabrizio Ravanelli excited supporters but there wasn’t a serious upturn in fortunes and after rejecting the opportunity to move upstairs into a Director of Football capacity, Jim Smith resigned as first-team manager in early October. Former Bolton Wanderers boss Colin Todd took over but he managed just four league victories and was sacked in January after a dire 3-1 FA Cup exit at home to lowly Bristol Rovers. Former player John Gregory returned to the club in February and despite victory in his first game against Tottenham Hotspur, he couldn’t galvanise Derby away from danger. After six seasons, relegation was confirmed by a 2-0 defeat to a brace of Michael Owen goals at Anfield on 20th April in the midst of a run of seven successive defeats.

 

2007-2008

Derby County returned to the Premier League in 2007-2008 and drew their first game back against Portsmouth 2-2. However, a 4-0 loss at Tottenham Hotspur and 6-0 defeat to Liverpool FC was a sign of things to come for the Midlands club. They were about to break records for all the wrong reasons.

Manager Billy Davies left the club towards the end of November and was replaced by former Wigan Athletic boss Paul Jewell. However, he failed to win a single Premier League game. In fact, Derby won just one match which came against Newcastle United in September.

Relegated at the end of March, they became the first club in Premier League history to be relegated in this calendar month and broke a top-flight record run of 32 league games without a win. Derby’s paltry tally of just 11 points is the lowest points total in Premier League history in both 38-game and 42-game seasons. It was a campaign to forget.

The Clubs: Sunderland

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
608 153 159 296 612 904 -292 618 16

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
John O’Shea 189
Sebastian Larsson 176
Phil Bardsley 174
Lee Cattermole 170
Michael Gray 170
Kevin Phillips 139
Kieran Richardson 134
Niall Quinn 129
Thomas Sorensen 126
Adam Johnson 122

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Kevin Phillips 61
Jermain Defoe 34
Darren Bent 32
Niall Quinn 29
Kenwyne Jones 26
Steven Fletcher 23
Adam Johnson 19
Stephane Sessegnon 17
Fabio Borini 14
Kieran Richardson 14

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Derby County 0-5 Sunderland 18th September 1999 1999-2000
Bradford City 0-4 Sunderland 2nd October 1999 1999-2000
Sunderland 4-0 West Bromwich Albion 13th December 2008 2008-2009
Sunderland 4-0 Bolton Wanderers 9th March 2010 2009-2010
Sunderland 4-0 Stoke City 18th September 2011 2011-2012
Sunderland 4-0 Cardiff City 27th April 2014 2013-2014
Crystal Palace 0-4 Sunderland 4th February 2017 2016-2017
Sunderland 5-2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 27th September 2009 2009-2010
Nottingham Forest 1-4 Sunderland 21st August 1996 1996-1997
Sunderland 4-1 Chelsea 4th December 1999 1999-2000

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Southampton 8-0 Sunderland 18th October 2014 2014-2015
Everton 7-1 Sunderland 24th November 2007 2007-2008
Chelsea 7-2 Sunderland 16th January 2010 2009-2010
Aston Villa 6-1 Sunderland 29th April 2013 2012-2013
Manchester United 5-0 Sunderland 21st December 1996 1996-1997
Everton 5-0 Sunderland 26th December 1999 1999-2000
Ipswich Town 5-0 Sunderland 29th December 2001 2001-2002
Chelsea 5-0 Sunderland 1st November 2008 2008-2009
Manchester City 5-0 Sunderland 3rd April 2011 2010-2011
Chelsea 6-2 Sunderland 16th March 1997 1996-1997

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Peter Reid 5 7th October 2002
Howard Wilkinson 1 10th March 2003
Mick McCarthy 2 6th March 2006
Roy Keane 2 4th December 2008
Ricky Sbragia 1 24th May 2009
Steve Bruce 3 30th November 2011
Martin O’Neill 2 30th March 2013
Paolo Di Canio 2 22nd September 2013
Gus Poyet 2 16th March 2015
Dick Advocaat 2 4th October 2015
Sam Allardyce 1 21st July 2016
David Moyes 1 22nd May 2017

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Sunderland 0-1 Liverpool FC 13th April 2002 48,355 2001-2002
Sunderland 1-3 Manchester United 13th October 2001 48,305 2001-2002
Sunderland 0-1 Newcastle United 24th February 2002 48,290 2001-2002
Sunderland 0-2 Leeds United 31st March 2001 48,285 2000-2001
Sunderland 1-1 Newcastle United 21st April 2001 48,277 2000-2001
Sunderland 0-1 Manchester United 31st January 2001 48,260 2000-2001
Sunderland 2-3 Tottenham Hotspur 14th April 2001 48,029 2000-2001
Sunderland 1-1 Arsenal 27th October 2001 48,029 2001-2002
Sunderland 0-0 Chelsea 9th December 2001 48,017 2001-2002
Sunderland 1-0 Everton 22nd December 2001 48,013 2001-2002

 

Intro

Sunderland have undergone some tough times recently. They became the first club since Wolverhampton Wanderers in 2013 to experience the indignity of back-to-back relegations to the third-tier of English football. The Black Cats made their Premier League debut in 1996 and achieved two finishes in the top 10 at the start of the millennium under Peter Reid’s tenure. Before their 2017 relegation, they were becoming the survival specialists, edging to safety in the closing weeks of each season from 2012-2013 to 2015-2016.

 

1996-1997

Sunderland initially coped well with the step-up to Premier League level and by the end of January, sat in 11th position in the table. Arsenal, Chelsea and reigning champions Manchester United were among the teams to experience defeat in what was the final campaign at the historic Roker Park ground. February was the month it started to go wrong with four successive defeats and a 6-2 beating at Stamford Bridge in March left them in a precarious position. The Black Cats beat Everton 3-0 in their last-ever match at Roker Park but on the final day, they lost 1-0 to Wimbledon and were relegated by just a single point after Coventry’s surprising victory over Tottenham Hotspur.

 

1999-2000

After two seasons back in the First Division, Sunderland returned to the Premier League in 1999-2000 and enjoyed a thrilling campaign back in the top-flight. It started badly with a 4-0 defeat at Stamford Bridge against Chelsea but they bounced back superbly. A memorable 2-1 success over Newcastle United in August saw the end of Ruud Gullit’s explosive tenure as manager and Peter Reid’s side enjoyed a 10-match unbeaten run off the back of that. Sunderland eventually finished in a creditable seventh position and with 30 goals scored, Kevin Phillips had a season to remember, winning the Golden Boot.

 

2000-2001

After scoring 44 goals in a fruitful partnership the previous season, the Niall Quinn/Kevin Phillips duo contributed to another 26 goals in 2000-2001 as Sunderland finished seventh for the second successive campaign. A 2-0 away victory at West Ham in mid-January had Peter Reid’s side in the dizzying heights of second place in the table but they only managed another three victories to slide out of European contention.

 

2001-2002

Sunderland’s form took a drastic slide in 2001-2002. They were the lowest scorers in the division, mustering just 29 goals in 38 matches. They were in ninth position after a 3-0 victory at Blackburn Rovers at Boxing Day which was their biggest win of the season but a 5-0 reverse only a few days later at Ipswich started a worrying run of form with just three victories in 19 games. Survival was only secured by a home 1-1 draw with Derby County on the last day of the season.

 

2002-2003

Sunderland’s 2002-2003 season was a nightmare. After winning just two of their first nine matches, Peter Reid parted company with the club after over six years at the helm. Howard Wilkinson was the shock choice as his successor and although there were notable home victories over Tottenham Hotspur and Liverpool FC, the Black Cats looked in real trouble and were in the drop zone at Christmas.

A calamitous first half at home to Charlton Athletic which saw Sunderland concede three own goals in the space of eight minutes virtually spelt the end for Wilkinson. He was sacked in mid-March. Mick McCarthy was brought in but it was already too late. He lost every single game and Sunderland went down in abject fashion. They were relegated on 12th April after a 2-0 defeat away at Birmingham City and finished with just 19 points, losing 15 successive matches.

 

2005-2006

Mick McCarthy stayed on as Sunderland manager after their relegation and guided them back to the top-flight at the second attempt of asking but once again, his squad were simply not good enough for Premier League football. Sunderland lost their first five matches and recorded just three wins all campaign. McCarthy was sacked in early March and Kevin Ball took over on a caretaker basis until the end of the season. Sunderland’s third Premier League relegation was confirmed in mid-April after a gutsy goalless draw at Old Trafford but ended with only 15 points – the second lowest tally ever recorded in Premier League history.

 

2007-2008

Former title-winning Premier League skipper Roy Keane was at the helm for Sunderland’s Premier League return in 2007. He brought in 12 new faces in pre-season and it took time for everything to gel, despite a brilliant opening day victory over Tottenham Hotspur. Sunderland won just two of their first 16 games and also lost 7-1 away at Everton in November. Keane though stuck to his principles and a vital away victory at Villa Park in March started a three-game winning sequence that eventually saw them survive in 15th place with 39 points.

 

2008-2009

Sunderland began the 2008-2009 season in solid form, winning three of their first nine matches, including a memorable 2-1 Tyne & Wear Derby success over Newcastle United. Manager Roy Keane though resigned on 4th December, five days after a damaging 4-1 home defeat to Bolton Wanderers. Ricky Sbragia took over and after impressive early victories in his tenure (4-0) over West Bromwich Albion and (4-1) away at Hull City, Sunderland slipped into relegation trouble. Despite winning just one of their last 13 matches, the poor form of Hull and Newcastle meant Sunderland survived. Sbragia resigned at the season’s end and owner Niall Quinn began his pursuit of Wigan boss Steve Bruce.

 

2009-2010

Steve Bruce agreed to leave Wigan Athletic in June to take the Sunderland post and he helped break the club-record transfer fee in the summer to acquire the services of Darren Bent for £10 million from Tottenham Hotspur. Bent’s response was to score 24 goals in the Premier League and finish third in the race for the Golden Boot, only below Didier Drogba and Wayne Rooney. Sunderland ended the season in a mediocre 13th place in the table but did achieve home wins over Liverpool FC, Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur during the campaign.

 

2010-2011

Apart from an embarrassing 5-1 clobbering from Newcastle United on Halloween, Sunderland enjoyed a brilliant first half of the 2010-2011 campaign. Darren Bent was still scoring goals, Asamoah Gyan settled quickly after his summer arrival and even the champions Chelsea were outclassed in a shock 3-0 defeat to the Black Cats in November.

After a 2-1 victory away at Blackpool in January, Sunderland sat in sixth position but Bent was sold to Aston Villa and a run of nine games without a win, losing eight of those matches took them onto the edges of the relegation battle. Late season wins away at Bolton Wanderers and West Ham United saw the club sneak a 10th place finish at the season’s conclusion.

 

2011-2012

Bruce spent £28 million in the summer transfer window but pre-season expectations of a European challenge quickly faded and after a 2-1 home defeat to bottom-placed Wigan Athletic at the end of November; he became the first managerial casualty of the season. Martin O’Neill quickly came in as his successor and won seven of his first 10 games in-charge to see Sunderland rise from 17th to 8th in the table. They eventually finished 13th after failing to win any of their last eight matches.

 

2012-2013

Martin O’Neill managed to get his long-time transfer target signed up in the summer as Steven Fletcher joined from relegated Wolverhampton Wanderers and he made a flying start, scoring five goals in his first four matches to win the Premier League Player of the Month award for September. Sunderland didn’t lose a top-flight match until a 3-0 loss at Manchester City in early October but never climbed higher than 11th in the table all season. After a 1-0 home defeat to Manchester United, O’Neill was surprisingly sacked despite an eight-game winless run. The temperamental Paolo Di Canio was his successor and two wins over Everton and famously, Newcastle United at St James’ Park saw Sunderland finish three points clear of the relegation zone.

 

2013-2014

With reports of dressing room mutiny and just one point from five games, Paolo Di Canio was dismissed by owner Ellis Short in late September. His successor was the likeable Gus Poyet and he helped Sunderland to another great escape. When the Black Cats won 3-0 at St James’ Park in early February for the second consecutive campaign, they rose to 14th place despite being bottom of the table on Christmas Day. However, they gathered just one point from their next eight games and relegation looked a certainty after a 5-1 defeat to Tottenham Hotspur.

The lost cause though turned into a fabulous run of form. A draw at Manchester City was followed by crucial home wins over Cardiff City and West Bromwich Albion and even more surprising, victories at Stamford Bridge and Old Trafford. Sunderland ended the campaign clear of trouble in 14th place. They also enjoyed a run to the League Cup final before losing 3-1 to Manchester City.

 

2014-2015

It looked like another long season for Sunderland supporters when they failed to win any of their first six matches, despite drawing five of these. A humiliating 8-0 loss to Southampton had the alarm bells ringing and despite another famous victory at St James’ Park before Christmas, Sunderland were fighting again against the threat of relegation. After a dreadful 4-0 home defeat to Aston Villa in mid-March, Gus Poyet was sacked.

Dick Advocaat was his replacement and once again, the late managerial change worked. Jermain Defoe returned to the Premier League after his spell in the MLS and scored a memorable goal in a home Derby victory over Newcastle and survival was secured by a goalless draw at Arsenal in the final week of the season. Advocaat was reduced to tears at the final whistle and confirmed shortly afterwards he would be stepping down. However, he had a change of heart later in the summer and remained in the post as first-team manager.

 

2015-2016

The Dick Advocaat magic faded away relatively quickly and once again, Sunderland were looking for a new boss when the Dutchman resigned in early October without a win to their name. Sam Allardyce was the next man in the hotseat but the initial bounce of victories over Newcastle United and Crystal Palace gave way to a dreadful December. Sunderland failed to collect a single point from five December matches and went into 2016 seven points adrift of safety.

Sunderland’s situation looked bleak after losing 2-0 at home to champions-elect Leicester City on 10th April but that was their final loss of the season. A crucial 3-0 away victory at Norwich City saw them regain destiny of their fate in the relegation battle and back-to-back home victories in May over Chelsea and Everton guided Sunderland to safety once again.

 

2016-2017

After England’s exit from the European Championships in the summer at the hands of Iceland, Roy Hodgson resigned and eventually, Sam Allardyce was tempted away from Sunderland to take control of the England national team. His successor was David Moyes but he looked flat and so did the team from the early stages of the campaign.

There were few high spots. Defoe continued to score goals and there was an enjoyable 4-0 away victory over Crystal Palace in early February over Allardyce, who was now Palace manager after his England experience turned sour. They were in the bottom three virtually all campaign and their 10-year spell in the top-flight ended in late April with a 1-0 home defeat to AFC Bournemouth. Sunderland finished bottom of the table and Moyes quit at the season’s end.

The Clubs: Bolton Wanderers

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
494 149 128 217 575 745 -170 575 13

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Jussi Jaaskelainen 379
Kevin Davies 316
Kevin Nolan 261
Ricardo Gardner 251
Ivan Campo 172
Bruno N’Gotty 147
Henrik Pedersen 143
Stelios Giannakopoulos 137
Per Frandsen 134
Gudni Bergsson 130

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Kevin Davies 67
Kevin Nolan 39
Matt Taylor 23
Henrik Pedersen 22
Nicolas Anelka 21
El-Hadji Diouf 21
Youri Djorkaeff 20
Stelios Giannakopoulos 20
Ivan Klasnic 20
Michael Ricketts 19

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Leicester City 0-5 Bolton Wanderers 18th August 2001 2001-2002
Bolton Wanderers 5-0 Stoke City 6th November 2011 2011-2012
Bolton Wanderers 5-1 Newcastle United 20th November 2010 2010-2011
Everton 0-4 Bolton Wanderers 17th December 2005 2005-2006
Bolton Wanderers 4-0 West Ham United 9th December 2006 2006-2007
Bolton Wanderers 4-0 Wigan Athletic 13th March 2010 2009-2010
Queens Park Rangers 0-4 Bolton Wanderers 13th August 2011 2011-2012
Bolton Wanderers 5-2 Crystal Palace 2nd May 1998 1997-1998
Middlesbrough 1-4 Bolton Wanderers 17th February 1996 1995-1996
Bolton Wanderers 4-1 Ipswich Town 6th April 2002 2001-2002

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Bolton Wanderers 0-6 Manchester United 25th February 1996 1995-1996
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 Bolton Wanderers 8th November 1997 1997-1998
Bolton Wanderers 0-5 Manchester United 25th February 1996 1995-1996
Manchester City 6-2 Bolton Wanderers 18th October 2003 2003-2004
Bolton Wanderers 1-5 Coventry City 31st January 1998 1997-1998
Chelsea 5-1 Bolton Wanderers 23rd December 2001 2001-2002
Chelsea 5-1 Bolton Wanderers 15th October 2005 2005-2006
Middlesbrough 5-1 Bolton Wanderers 20th January 2007 2006-2007
Aston Villa 5-1 Bolton Wanderers 7th November 2009 2009-2010
Bolton Wanderers 1-5 Chelsea 2nd October 2011 2011-2012

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Roy McFarland 1 7th January 1996
Colin Todd 2 22nd September 1999
Sam Allardyce 6 30th April 2007
Sammy Lee 1 17th October 2007
Gary Megson 3 30th December 2009
Owen Coyle 3 9th October 2012

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Bolton Wanderers 2-2 Leicester City 28th December 2003 28,353 2003-2004
Bolton Wanderers 0-0 Fulham 6th February 2010 28,353 2009-2010
Bolton Wanderers 1-1 Arsenal 20th December 2003 28,003 2003-2004
Bolton Wanderers 1-0 Liverpool FC 29th August 2004 27,880 2004-2005
Bolton Wanderers 3-1 Tottenham Hotspur 1st February 2005 27,780 2004-2005
Bolton Wanderers 2-2 Manchester United 11th September 2004 27,766 2004-2005
Bolton Wanderers 1-2 Manchester United 1st April 2006 27,718 2005-2006
Bolton Wanderers 3-2 Everton 15th May 2005 27,701 2004-2005
Bolton Wanderers 1-2 Manchester United 7th January 2004 27,668 2003-2004
Bolton Wanderers 0-2 Chelsea 30th April 2005 27,653 2004-2005

 

Intro

Bolton Wanderers have played Premier League football in 13 seasons and at their peak, the Trotters enjoyed four successive finishes in the top eight under the guidance of Sam Allardyce, peaking with sixth position in 2004-2005. Bolton’s ability to get the best out of experienced players such as Jay-Jay Okocha, Youri Djorkaeff, Ivan Campo and Gary Speed served them well for several years. Relegation came in 2012 under Owen Coyle’s stewardship and with current severe financial problems; it is looking difficult to see Bolton returning to the top-flight in the short-term.

 

1995-1996

After an absence of 15 years, Bolton Wanderers returned to the top-flight in 1995-1996 and produced an early season surprise when they defeated reigning champions Blackburn Rovers 2-1. However, they remained at the foot of the table for much of the campaign and in early January, manager Roy McFarland was sacked. His assistant Colin Todd took over and although results did improve, the damage had already been done and Bolton went down on the final Saturday of the season, losing 1-0 to Southampton.

 

1997-1998

1997-1998 was the first season Bolton Wanderers moved into their new state-of-the-art home and there was controversy in their opening match at The Reebok Stadium. In a goalless draw with Everton, Bolton were denied a goal when Terry Phelan hooked the ball off the goal-line when the ball had clearly crossed the line. It would prove to be a decisive moment in their season. Colin Todd paid a club-record fee to bring Dean Holdsworth to the club in October for £3.5 million and they had a strong home record, winning seven times. However, they went into the final day still needing a positive result to survive.

Bolton went to Chelsea but despite a brave effort, lost 2-0 and were relegated on goal difference as Everton’s 1-1 draw with Coventry City was enough to keep the Toffees in the Premier League. Bolton fans felt robbed because of the controversy during the early-season encounter with Everton in the days where goal-line technology was just a pipedream.

 

2001-2002

After a four-year absence, Bolton returned to the Premier League with Sam Allardyce as manager and made an amazing start, winning their first three games which included a 2-1 victory over Liverpool FC. Michael Ricketts’ form won him an England international call-up in February and Ricketts also scored the winning goal at Old Trafford as Bolton stunned the champions in October. Form dipped in the winter and it was only the arrivals of Fredi Bobic and Youri Djorkaeff that kept Bolton away from danger. A masterful first half display against Ipswich Town which saw the home side go 4-0 infront before half-time was a crucial result. Bolton finished in 16th place and avoided relegation for the first time in their Premier League existence.

 

2002-2003

Bolton enjoyed another promising start to the 2002-2003 season. They bounced back well from an opening day 4-1 loss to Fulham by defeating both Aston Villa and then, for a second successive season, success at Old Trafford with Kevin Nolan’s only strike of the season beating Manchester United. Only two wins in their next 21 games followed and another relegation scrap would follow. However, the form of Youri Djorkaeff, Per Frandsen and Jay-Jay Okocha was important in the run-in. They lost only two of their final 13 matches and survival was achieved at West Ham’s expense on the final day after beating Middlesbrough 2-1.

 

2003-2004

Fears of another relegation scramble looked like a distinct possibility after back-to-back 4-0 defeats on the road at Manchester United and Portsmouth. In fact, Bolton won just one of their first 10 matches but Kevin Nolan’s matchwinner at White Hart Lane in early November was the catalyst for a big improvement from Sam Allardyce’s side. They actually enjoyed a comfortable season, finishing in a tremendous eighth position with a run of five successive victories achieved towards the end of the season. Bolton also reached the League Cup final but lost the showpiece event 2-1 to Middlesbrough.

 

2004-2005

The arrivals of Fernando Hierro, Gary Speed and El-Hadji Diouf in pre-season added to the quality and experience that Sam Allardyce was forming. The Trotters won three of their first four matches and sat in fourth place after beating Newcastle United 2-1 at the end of October. However, they ended 2004 in 13th place after a dreadful December which brought six successive defeats. Bolton recovered brilliantly from this mid-season slump to beat Arsenal and Everton in the second half of the campaign and finished in a Premier League high of sixth, level on points with Liverpool FC and only behind the Reds on goal difference.

 

2005-2006

Sam Allardyce had a new assistant with Sammy Lee replacing Phil Brown after Brown decided to go and manage Derby County. Bolton were competing in the UEFA Cup and reached the round-of-32 before bowing out to Marseille. Domestically, the Trotters had another impressive season and looked set for another top six finish until a five-game losing sequence towards the campaign’s end saw them slide to eighth at the season’s end. Allardyce was interviewed for the England manager’s job but lost out on the role to Middlesbrough boss Steve McClaren.

 

2006-2007

Nicolas Anelka was a major new arrival in the summer and although it took until November for him to score, the Frenchman finished with 11 goals to be the club’s top scorer. Bolton again proved tough to beat and sat in third spot on New Years’ Day only below Manchester United and Chelsea in the table. They eventually finished seventh and secured European qualification again but lost their manager as Allardyce resigned three games before the end of the season. Sammy Lee succeeded him.

 

2007-2008

Bolton made a very slow start to 2007-2008 and after winning just one match in their first nine of the campaign; Sammy Lee was fired in mid-October. Gary Megson was the surprise replacement and it wasn’t a popular appointment either. Megson though managed to galvanise the team to a shock victory over Manchester United in November with Nicolas Anelka scoring the only goal. Anelka scored 10 times before leaving for Chelsea in the January transfer window. An unbeaten five-game sequence at the end of the season, including a final day draw at Stamford Bridge kept Bolton in the top-flight but down in 16th place and only safe by a solitary point from relegated Reading.

 

2008-2009

Anelka’s long-term replacement in the striking department was Johan Elmander who arrived for a club-record fee of £8.2 million from Toulouse. The Swede struggled though in his debut campaign and so did Bolton again, who eventually finished 13th and lost exactly half of their 38 games. Bolton’s best period came in November when they four out of their five matches including an impressive 4-1 away victory at Sunderland which spelt the end for Roy Keane as Black Cats boss.

 

2009-2010

The pressure was on Gary Megson early on when Bolton finished August pointless from all three matches played. Just four victories were recorded in the first half of the campaign and after throwing away a two-goal lead to draw with fellow strugglers Hull City during the festive period, Megson was sacked. It was a popular decision with many who had grown tired of his sterile tactics and lack of productive results. Bolton then pursued former player Owen Coyle and managed to persuade him to leave Burnley to take the vacancy at The Reebok. Coyle managed six further victories including a priceless success over his former club in January and completed his short-term mission of keeping Bolton in the Premier League. They eventually finished 14th.

 

2010-2011

Bolton Wanderers enjoyed a mini renaissance in 2010-2011 and were strong all season at The Reebok Stadium. They won 10 times on home soil, with Tottenham Hotspur and Arsenal among their victims. The 2-1 victory over the Gunners in April finished off Arsenal’s title challenge for another season. Coyle’s team were sixth just before Christmas and playing some superb football. Elmander enjoyed his best campaign in English football and scored a Goal of the Season contender in a 3-2 away victory at Wolverhampton Wanderers in November.

There was also a run to the FA Cup semi-finals which ended in a demoralising 5-0 defeat to Stoke City and that had a damaging effect on the run-in. The Trotters lost their last five games of the season and ended 14th for the second successive campaign, despite sitting in the top half for the majority of the season.

 

2011-2012

A 4-0 opening day victory away at Queens Park Rangers turned out to be a false dawn. Bolton went on to lose their next six matches, losing heavily to Manchester United and Chelsea on home soil too. There was a 5-0 triumph over Stoke in November to exact nice revenge on the Potters for April’s FA Cup semi-final hiding but Bolton went into 2012 bottom of the table.

In March, midfielder Fabrice Muamba suffered a cardiac arrest in the first half of their FA Cup quarter-final against Tottenham Hotspur. Muamba would make a full recovery but had to retire from playing football professionally after the incident.

After conceding a two-goal lead to draw their final home match of the season against West Bromwich Albion, Bolton had to win at Stoke on the final day to have any chance of avoiding relegation. The 2-2 draw wasn’t enough and that meant they were relegated back to the Championship despite QPR’s final day defeat at Manchester City.

The Clubs: Watford

All statistics correct upto 20th March 2019

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
220 57 50 113 230 362 -132 221 6

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Troy Deeney 131
Etienne Capoue 119
Heurelho Gomes 100
Jose Holebas 96
Craig Cathcart 86
Abdoulaye Doucoure 84
Sebastian Prodl 76
Adrian Mariappa 75
Roberto Pereyra 72
Miguel Britos 65

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Troy Deeney 36
Odion Ighalo 17
Roberto Pereyra 13
Abdoulaye Doucoure 11
Andre Gray 10
Etienne Capoue 9
Gerard Deulofeu 8
Heidar Helguson 6
Jose Holebas 6
Hameur Bouazza 5

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Cardiff City 1-5 Watford 22nd February 2019 2018-2019
Watford 4-1 Chelsea 5th February 2018 2017-2018
Watford 3-0 Liverpool FC 20th December 2015 2015-2016
Newcastle United 0-3 Watford 25th November 2017 2017-2018
Watford 3-0 Huddersfield Town 27th October 2018 2018-2019
Watford 4-2 Portsmouth 9th April 2007 2006-2007
West Ham United 2-4 Watford 10th September 2016 2016-2017
Watford 3-1 Manchester United 18th September 2016 2016-2017
Burnley 1-3 Watford 19th August 2018 2018-2019
Watford 2-0 Middlesbrough 4th November 2006 2006-2007

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Watford 0-6 Manchester City 16th September 2017 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 6-1 Watford 6th November 2016 2016-2017
Wimbledon 5-0 Watford 4th December 1999 1999-2000
Watford 0-5 Manchester City 21st May 2017 2016-2017
Liverpool FC 5-0 Watford 17th March 2018 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 5-0 Watford 27th February 2019 2018-2019
Coventry City 4-0 Watford 31st October 1999 1999-2000
Tottenham Hotspur 4-0 Watford 26th December 1999 1999-2000
Aston Villa 4-0 Watford 5th February 2000 1999-2000
Chelsea 4-0 Watford 11th November 2006 2006-2007

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Graham Taylor 1 30th June 2001
Aidy Boothroyd 1 3rd November 2008
Quique Sanchez Flores 1 30th June 2016
Walter Mazzarri 1 22nd May 2017
Marco Silva 1 21st January 2018
Javi Gracia 2  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Watford 2-3 Sunderland 27th November 1999 21,590 1999-2000
Watford 2-3 Liverpool FC 15th January 2000 21,367 1999-2000
Watford 1-0 Chelsea 18th September 1999 21,244 1999-2000
Watford 3-1 Manchester United 18th September 2016 21,118 2016-2017
Watford 2-2 Sunderland 15th May 2016 21,012 2015-2016
Watford 0-1 Liverpool FC 1st May 2017 20,959 2016-2017
Watford 0-0 Chelsea 3rd February 2016 20,910 2015-2016
Watford 0-1 Leicester City 5th March 2016 20,884 2015-2016
Watford 1-4 Tottenham Hotspur 1st January 2017 20,882 2016-2017
Watford 0-0 AFC Bournemouth 27th February 2016 20,831 2015-2016

 

Intro

Watford are currently in their sixth Premier League season and although they’ve done it slightly unconventionally regarding regular managerial appointments, the Pozzo family have done a lot to make the club a stable member of the top-flight. After relegation in their first two Premier League campaigns, the Hornets have been an ever-present since 2015 and look set to record their first top 10 finish with less than 10 games to go in the 2018-2019 season under the shrewd management of Javi Gracia.

 

1999-2000

Watford’s Premier League debut campaign came in 1999-2000 with club legend and former England manager Graham Taylor guiding them into the elite after two successive promotions. They lost their opening fixture 3-2 to Wimbledon but competed well in the early months and pulled off two surprising victories. Tommy Mooney scored the only goal of the game against Liverpool FC at Anfield, whilst it was Allan Smart who turned out to be the matchwinner at home to Chelsea in September. However, Watford won only three more matches and their relegation was confirmed after a 3-2 home defeat to Arsenal in April. They wouldn’t return for six years to the Premier League.

 

2006-2007

Watford returned to the Premier League in 2006-2007 but once again found the top-flight to be a real struggle. Aidy Boothroyd’s side tasted victory just five times in 38 games and relegation was confirmed by a 1-1 home draw with Manchester City in April. Highs of the season were home wins over Middlesbrough (2-0 in November) and Portsmouth (4-2 in April). When he came on as a substitute on the final day of the season, back-up goalkeeper Alec Chamberlain became the oldest player to ever figure in the Premier League, aged 42.

 

2015-2016

Although it was Slavisa Jokanovic who got Watford promoted, he wasn’t given a new contract and the Pozzo family turned to the former Valencia coach Quique Sanchez Flores to steer Watford through the 2015-2016 season. An FA Cup semi-final appearance and 13th place finish in the Premier League was very respectable but Flores still left at the end of the campaign. The plus points were the partnership between skipper Troy Deeney and Odion Ighalo which contributed 28 goals whilst among the victories was a 3-0 success over Liverpool FC at Vicarage Road in December and fine away wins at Newcastle United, Stoke City and Crystal Palace.

 

2016-2017

Italian Walter Mazzarri was Flores’ successor and like his previous incumbent, he would last just one season in the Watford hotseat. Although they were 9th in the table by early April, the Hornets lost their last six games to finish 17th in the table and only six points above the drop zone. Ighalo left the club in the January transfer window for the Chinese Super League whilst Manchester United were beaten 3-1 in September. The season will always be tinged with sadness though for Watford supporters. In January, Graham Taylor died aged 72 after suffering a heart attack. A statue was unveiled outside the ground in his honour in August 2018.

 

2017-2018

Watford’s 120th season as a football club looked very promising in the season’s early months. Marco Silva had succeeded Walter Mazzarri in the summer and his side were playing some excellent football, beating Arsenal 2-1, drawing 3-3 with Liverpool FC and losing 4-2 to Chelsea when they dominated for much of the game at Stamford Bridge. However, Silva was then subject to an approach from Everton in mid-November and a sudden downturn in form followed. On 21st January, Watford sacked the Portuguese boss and blamed Everton in a strong statement for the decision, feeling the approach had been ill-timed and distracted Silva’s concentration. Javi Gracia was appointed his successor and despite failing to win a match away from home in the second half of the season, Watford stayed up comfortably in 14th position.

 

2018-2019

It was tipped to be a season of struggle for Watford but they have impressed many with their bustling, energetic displays. Their campaign began with four successive victories which included a 2-1 success over Tottenham Hotspur in early September. The Hornets have figured regularly in the top 10 this season and in February, Gerard Deulofeu became the first Watford player to score a hat-trick in the Premier League when his treble helped defeat Cardiff City 5-1. This is Watford’s biggest-ever Premier League victory. Watford sit in eighth position going into the March international break.

The Clubs: Barnsley

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
38 10 5 23 37 82 -45 35 1

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Neil Redfearn 37
Darren Barnard 35
Nicky Eaden 35
Adie Moses 35
Martin Bullock 32
Dave Watson 30
Ashley Ward 29
Arjan de Zeeuw 26
Andy Liddell 26
Darren Sheridan 26

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Neil Redfearn 10
Ashley Ward 8
Jan Aage Fjortoft 6
Gjorgji Hristov 4
Jovo Bosancic 3
Darren Barnard 2
Eric Tinkler 2
John Hendrie 1
Scott Jones 1
Andy Liddell 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Barnsley 2-0 Coventry City 20th October 1997 1997-1998
Barnsley 4-3 Southampton 14th March 1998 1997-1998
Barnsley 2-1 Bolton Wanderers 27th August 1997 1997-1998
Barnsley 2-1 Wimbledon 28th February 1998 1997-1998
Barnsley 2-1 Sheffield Wednesday 11th April 1998 1997-1998

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 7-0 Barnsley 25th October 1997 1997-1998
Barnsley 0-6 Chelsea 24th August 1997 1997-1998
West Ham United 6-0 Barnsley 10th January 1998 1997-1998
Arsenal 5-0 Barnsley 4th October 1997 1997-1998
Wimbledon 4-1 Barnsley 23rd September 1997 1997-1998

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Danny Wilson 1 5th July 1998

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Barnsley 0-2 Manchester United 10th May 1998 18,694 1997-1998
Barnsley 2-1 Sheffield Wednesday 11th April 1998 18,692 1997-1998
Barnsley 1-1 Tottenham Hotspur 18th April 1998 18,692 1997-1998
Barnsley 0-2 Arsenal 25th April 1998 18,691 1997-1998
Barnsley 2-3 Leeds United 29th November 1997 18,690 1997-1998

 

Intro

Barnsley enjoyed one season of top-flight football in 1997-1998 and their fans certainly made the most of the experience following their surprising promotion from Division One. Danny Wilson’s side fought against the odds throughout the season and although they took a few thrashings along the way, they also recorded 10 victories, including a wonderful 1-0 success at Anfield in November. However, the Tykes just lacked the cutting edge to avoid relegation and they went down on the penultimate weekend of the season. Apart from a play-off final defeat to Ipswich Town in 2000, they haven’t been close to returning to the top-flight since.

 

1997-1998

Barnsley made a wonderful start to their Premier League life, taking the lead on the first day inside nine minutes against West Ham United through a header by Neil Redfearn. However, the Hammers came back in the second half to win 2-1. Days later though, Redfearn was on-target again at Selhurst Park as the Tykes won their first away match in the division 1-0 at Crystal Palace.

Danny Wilson’s side continued to battle all season, despite taking a few pastings from the elite in the Premier League. They were beaten 6-0 at home by Chelsea, 7-0 at Old Trafford by Manchester United and 5-0 against Arsenal at Highbury. Barnsley conceded 82 in the season – an average of 2.1 goals per game and that made the battle to avoid the drop very difficult.

There were highs for the supporters. Ashley Ward – an August arrival from Derby County scored the winning goal at Anfield in November to record one of the shock victories of the season. Ward finished with eight goals – two behind the top scorer who was Redfearn. However, relegation was confirmed at Filbert Street on the final Saturday of the season. Theo Zagorakis’ goal gave Leicester City a 1-0 victory which confirmed Barnsley’s demise back to Division One. Wilson left in the summer to fill the managerial vacancy at his former club Sheffield Wednesday and since then in the last 20 years, the Yorkshire club have been flirting between the Championship and League One on a regular basis.

However, the Barnsley supporters will never forget their one-season experience in the Premier League.

The Clubs: Coventry City

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
354 99 112 143 387 490 -103 409 9

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Steve Ogrizovic 191
Paul Telfer 191
Richard Shaw 178
Paul Williams 175
Peter Ndlovu 152
Brian Borrows 145
Dion Dublin 145
Noel Whelan 134
Gary McAllister 119
Gary Breen 115

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Dion Dublin 61
Peter Ndlovu 35
Noel Whelan 31
Darren Huckerby 28
Mick Quinn 25
Gary McAllister 20
Mustapha Hadji 12
Robbie Keane 12
John Williams 11
John Aloisi 10

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Coventry City 5-0 Blackburn Rovers 9th December 1995 1995-1996
Coventry City 5-1 Liverpool FC 19th December 1992 1992-1993
Bolton Wanderers 1-5 Coventry City 31st January 1998 1997-1998
Coventry City 4-0 Manchester City 19th February 1994 1993-1994
Coventry City 4-0 Tottenham Hotspur 13th December 1997 1997-1998
Coventry City 4-0 Nottingham Forest 9th January 1999 1998-1999
Coventry City 4-0 Watford 31st October 1999 1999-2000
Coventry City 4-0 Bradford City 18th March 2000 1999-2000
Blackburn Rovers 2-5 Coventry City 26th January 1993 1992-1993
Aston Villa 1-4 Coventry City 27th February 1999 1998-1999

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Chelsea 6-1 Coventry City 21st October 2000 2000-2001
Manchester United 5-0 Coventry City 28th December 1992 1992-1993
West Ham United 5-0 Coventry City 22nd April 2000 1999-2000
Queens Park Rangers 5-1 Coventry City 23rd October 1993 1993-1994
Sheffield Wednesday 5-1 Coventry City 28th December 1994 1994-1995
Blackburn Rovers 5-1 Coventry City 23rd September 1995 1995-1996
Coventry City 1-5 Newcastle United 19th September 1998 1998-1999
Liverpool FC 4-0 Coventry City 17th April 1993 1992-1993
Newcastle United 4-0 Coventry City 23rd February 1994 1993-1994
Newcastle United 4-0 Coventry City 24th August 1994 1994-1995

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Bobby Gould 2 23rd October 1993
Phil Neal 2 14th February 1995
Ron Atkinson 3 1st November 1996
Gordon Strachan 5 10th September 2001

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Coventry City 0-1 Manchester United 12th April 1993 24,429 1992-1993
Coventry City 3-0 Aston Villa 26th December 1992 24,245 1992-1993
Coventry City 0-4 Manchester United 22nd November 1995 23,400 1995-1996
Coventry City 1-0 Liverpool FC 6th April 1996 23,137 1995-1996
Coventry City 1-1 Tottenham Hotspur 26th December 1998 23,098 1998-1999
Coventry City 0-3 Liverpool FC 1st April 2000 23,098 1999-2000
Coventry City 0-2 Manchester United 18th January 1997 23,085 1996-1997
Coventry City 0-1 Tottenham Hotspur 26th February 2000 23,077 1999-2000
Coventry City 0-2 Liverpool FC 28th April 2001 23,063 2000-2001
Coventry City 2-1 Liverpool FC 30th January 1999 23,056 1998-1999

 

Intro

Coventry City were one of the great survivors in the first decade of the Premier League. The Sky Blues were involved in many relegation scraps and narrowly avoided the drop on the final day in both 1996 and 1997. However, they also had a habit of pulling off some unexpected surprises as many of the elite Premier League sides discovered. Relegation came in 2001 and since then, ownership issues, stadium problems and fan protests have seen the club drop as low as League Two. Currently, they are in League One after winning the play-off final in League Two last season.

 

1992-1993

Coventry made a brilliant start to life in the Premier League under Bobby Gould, winning six of their first eight matches to sit in the dizzying heights of second position, only below fellow early season pacesetters Norwich City. Unlike the Canaries though, they couldn’t keep that level up and dropped into mid-table as the campaign progressed. There was a 5-1 demolition of Liverpool FC and an impressive 5-2 victory away at Blackburn in January but departures of Roberto Rosario to Nottingham Forest and Kevin Gallacher to Blackburn Rovers hurt their attacking prowess and they eventually finished just three points above the relegation zone.

 

1993-1994

Coventry’s top scorer in 1992-1993, Mick Quinn, made a searing start to the new campaign with an opening day hat-trick at Highbury against Arsenal. However, a run of six league games without a win culminated in the resignation of manager Bobby Gould just moments after a 5-1 beating at the hands of Queens Park Rangers in October. Former Bolton Wanderers manager Phil Neal was his successor and he kept Coventry well clear of danger. An unbeaten run of seven matches at the end of the campaign saw the Sky Blues finish a solid 11th. It was also their 2-1 victory over Blackburn Rovers on 2nd May that handed the title to Manchester United.

 

1994-1995

Only one win in their first eight matches (2-1 vs. Leeds United) left Coventry in the bottom four in early October and despite the goals of Dion Dublin on a consistent basis after his £2 million transfer from Manchester United, the Sky Blues were in the thick of the relegation battle all season. Despite beating fellow strugglers Crystal Palace 2-0 on 11th February, manager Phil Neal still lost his job three days later.

Ron Atkinson took over and he steered Coventry to five victories in the closing months of the campaign including a 3-2 win at Anfield where Peter Ndlovu scored a hat-trick. Safety was clinched in the final week of the season with a 3-1 victory at White Hart Lane over Tottenham Hotspur. Coventry finished the campaign in 16th place – three places clear of the drop zone.

 

1995-1996

It was another season of struggle for Coventry and their supporters – as they won just one of their first 16 encounters. Dion Dublin continued to score plenty of goals but even though he scored a hat-trick at Sheffield Wednesday in early December, a 4-3 defeat at Hillsborough meant they dropped to bottom in the table.

Days later, reigning champions Blackburn Rovers were well-beaten 5-0 which remains the Sky Blues’ biggest-ever Premier League victory. In April, defender David Busst sustained a career-ending injury against Manchester United which is considered one of the worst injuries ever sustained on a football pitch. The defeat at Old Trafford was their last of the season. Eight points gained from their last four matches and four consecutive clean sheets meant they avoided relegation on the final day of the season after a goalless draw with Leeds United.

 

1996-1997

An opening day 3-0 defeat at home to Nottingham Forest set the tone for another difficult campaign for Coventry City and 24 hours after a 1-1 draw away at Everton, Ron Atkinson stepped down as manager and moved into a Director of Football role. His assistant Gordon Strachan succeeded him and initially, there was a positive effect. A run of four successive victories guided the Sky Blues into 11th place by mid-January with Darren Huckerby arriving to help take the pressure off Dion Dublin in regards to goalscoring threats. Dublin still starred though – finishing top scorer with 14 strikes and his goals ultimately kept Coventry just clear of danger.

However, when they lost 2-1 at home to Derby County on the penultimate weekend of the season, it looked like Coventry’s 30-year stay in England’s top-flight was on the verge of ending. They had to beat Tottenham Hotspur on the final day and goals from Dublin and Paul Williams saw them pull off an unlikely 2-1 victory. Sunderland lost at Wimbledon so the Black Cats were relegated instead. Coventry had survived again by the skin of their teeth.

 

1997-1998

Gordon Strachan’s first full campaign in the hotseat turned out to be a huge success. This time, there was no relegation battle to worry about. Coventry finished an impressive 11th with 52 points amassed and they lost just 10 of their 38 league matches – the fourth-lowest of the season.

Dion Dublin turned down a move to Blackburn Rovers and his commitment to the Coventry cause remained. An opening day hat-trick against Chelsea set the tone for his season which saw him share the Golden Boot with 18 goals alongside Michael Owen and Chris Sutton. The most enjoyable result was the post-Christmas 3-2 victory over Manchester United with Darren Huckerby scoring a late winner for the Sky Blues.

 

1998-1999

For the second consecutive season, Coventry started their season with victory over Chelsea with both Huckerby and Dublin on-target. Dublin though left in early November, signing in mid-November for Aston Villa and it meant the club struggled to replicate the goalscoring form of the previous campaign. Coventry finished in 15th place and nine points worse off but eight home wins at Highfield Road and 10 goals from Noel Whelan meant they were never in any significant relegation danger.

Steve Froggatt scored the Goal of the Season against Everton in mid-November whilst the 4-1 away victory at Villa Park in February was the highlight of the campaign from a results perspective.

 

1999-2000

There was a Moroccan feel to Coventry in pre-season as Mustapha Hadji and Youssef Chippo both arrived to add a continental approach to the Sky Blues. Also arriving was Robbie Keane and the highly-rated youngster scored 12 Premier League goals in his debut top-flight campaign. Coventry enjoyed one of the best home records in the division, winning 12 of their 19 matches at Highfield Road which included a memorable 3-2 success on Boxing Day over Arsenal. However, they failed to win a single match on their travels and that restricted them to a 14th place finish.

 

2000-2001

After 16 months without an away victory, Coventry City’s 2-1 win at The Dell over Southampton on 23rd August ended their barren run and hopes were high for a better campaign, especially when Manchester City were beaten days later on their own patch. However, only two more victories followed before Christmas and with Keane sold in the summer to Inter Milan, goalscoring became a real problem. Hadji and newcomer Craig Bellamy were top of the charts but both only managed six goals apiece.

After 34 years of top-flight football, Coventry’s luck ran out. Despite leading 2-0 at Villa Park in their penultimate game of the season, Paul Merson’s late winner helped Aston Villa claim all three points and condemn Coventry to relegation to Division One. Strachan stepped down a few months later.

The Clubs: Tottenham Hotspur

All statistics correct upto 23rd February 2019

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
1027 443 255 329 1535 1294 +240 1584 27

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Darren Anderton 297
Jermain Defoe 276
Ledley King 268
Aaron Lennon 266
Sol Campbell 255
Ian Walker 240
Robbie Keane 238
Michael Dawson 236
Teddy Sheringham 236
Hugo Lloris 229

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Harry Kane 123
Teddy Sheringham 98
Jermain Defoe 91
Robbie Keane 91
Chris Armstrong 48
Christian Eriksen 46
Gareth Bale 43
Dele Alli 42
Heung-Min Son 41
Emmanuel Adebayor 35

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Tottenham Hotspur 9-1 Wigan Athletic 22nd November 2009 2009-2010
Hull City 1-7 Tottenham Hotspur 21st May 2017 2016-2017
Tottenham Hotspur 7-2 Southampton 11th March 2000 1999-2000
Leicester City 1-6 Tottenham Hotspur 18th May 2017 2016-2017
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 Oldham Athletic 18th September 1993 1993-1994
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 Burnley 26th September 2009 2009-2010
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 Newcastle United 11th February 2012 2011-2012
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 Swansea City 3rd December 2016 2016-2017
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 AFC Bournemouth 26th December 2018 2018-2019
Wimbledon 2-6 Tottenham Hotspur 2nd May 1998 1997-1998

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Newcastle United 7-1 Tottenham Hotspur 28th December 1996 1996-1997
Sheffield United 6-0 Tottenham Hotspur 2nd March 1993 1992-1993
Manchester City 6-0 Tottenham Hotspur 24th November 2013 2013-2014
Tottenham Hotspur 1-6 Chelsea 6th December 1997 1997-1998
Leeds United 5-0 Tottenham Hotspur 25th August 1992 1992-1993
Tottenham Hotspur 0-5 Liverpool FC 15th December 2013 2013-2014
Liverpool FC 6-2 Tottenham Hotspur 8th May 1993 1992-1993
Middlesbrough 5-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd May 2003 2002-2003
Tottenham Hotspur 1-5 Manchester City 28th August 2011 2011-2012
Tottenham Hotspur 1-5 Manchester City 29th January 2014 2013-2014

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Ray Clemence & Doug Livermore 1 19th June 1993
Ossie Ardiles 2 1st November 1994
Gerry Francis 4 19th November 1997
Christian Gross 2 5th September 1998
George Graham 3 16th March 2001
Glenn Hoddle 4 20th September 2003
David Pleat 1 3rd June 2004
Jacques Santini 1 6th November 2004
Martin Jol 4 25th October 2007
Juande Ramos 2 27th October 2008
Harry Redknapp 4 14th June 2012
Andre Villas-Boas 2 16th December 2013
Tim Sherwood 1 13th May 2014
Mauricio Pochettino 5  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Tottenham Hotspur 1-0 Arsenal 10th February 2018 83,222 2018-2019
Tottenham Hotspur 2-0 Manchester United 31st January 2018 81,978 2018-2019
Tottenham Hotspur 4-1 Liverpool FC 22nd October 2017 80,827 2016-2017
Tottenham Hotspur 1-3 Manchester City 14th April 2018 80,811 2017-2018
Tottenham Hotspur 1-2 Liverpool FC 15th September 2018 80,188 2017-2018
Tottenham Hotspur 0-1 Manchester United 13th January 2019 80,062 2017-2018
Tottenham Hotspur 5-4 Leicester City 13th May 2018 77,841 2017-2018
Tottenham Hotspur 4-0 Everton 13th January 2018 76,251 2017-2018
Tottenham Hotspur 1-2 Chelsea 20th August 2017 73,587 2017-2018
Tottenham Hotspur 1-0 AFC Bournemouth 14th October 2017 73,502 2017-2018

 

Intro

Tottenham Hotspur have grown from a side that often frustrated their own supporters, let alone the neutrals to one of the most exciting teams in the English game. Mauricio Pochettino’s side have come a long way since his appointment in 2014, with Spurs now becoming a regular challenger for the title in recent campaigns. Whilst the main Premier League prize has eluded them so far, the excitement of playing in a new state-of-the-art stadium and the talents of the likes of Harry Kane, Heung-Min Son and Christian Eriksen has supporters looking ahead to a future of serious promise.

 

1992-1993

Doug Livermore and Ray Clemence were appointed as joint managers for the first Premier League campaign and Tottenham finished in eighth position, only missing out on a top six finish because of a negative goal difference. Teddy Sheringham finished the season as top scorer in the league, scoring 21 times in his first season as a Spurs player after his August arrival from Nottingham Forest.

 

1993-1994

Club legend Ossie Ardiles was appointed in the summer as the club’s new manager and excitement was palpable around the supporters with his caviller all-out attack style set to bring plenty of excitement to White Hart Lane. It was for the wrong reasons though. Tottenham lost seven successive games in mid-season and finished a dreary 15th in the table. They weren’t helped by an Achilles injury to top scorer Sheringham in October, which meant he only managed 19 appearances during the season.

 

1994-1995

Tottenham began the season with a 12-point deduction hanging over their head after being found guilty of financial irregularities during the 1980s by the FA. Ardiles continued to stick to his principles and the signing of Jurgen Klinsmann in the summer attracted plenty of headlines and anticipation among both fans and media. Klinsmann scored on his debut and then produced his infamous ‘dive’ celebration. The German was a rousing success, winning the Football Writers’ Award and scoring 21 Premier League goals but he moved back to Germany at the end of the campaign.

Ardiles didn’t see the season out. A shock 3-0 League Cup loss to Notts County in October brought his unsuccessful reign to an end. Gerry Francis was appointed as his successor after he’d resigned from his position as Queens Park Rangers boss. Francis installed more defensive stability into the side, whilst still allowing the goalscoring and creative talents of Klinsmann, Sheringham, Darren Anderton and Nick Barmby to shine. They finished in seventh position in the final table.

In December 1994, chairman Alan Sugar won his appeal against Tottenham’s points deduction and also won them back entry into the FA Cup, having been initially banned from participating in this competition. Tottenham reached the semi-finals before losing to a Daniel Amokachi-inspired Everton at Elland Road.

 

1995-1996

Gerry Francis’ first full season as Tottenham manager started badly with just two points from the club’s first four matches but they quickly found their form, with Sheringham forming an excellent partnership with £4 million summer arrival Chris Armstrong following Klinsmann’s departure. The high of the campaign was a fantastic 4-1 victory over Manchester United on New Years’ Day which had Spurs hit the heights of fourth position in the table. They ended up finishing eighth, just one point below Arsenal in fifth who took the final UEFA Cup qualifying position.

 

1996-1997

It was a step backwards for Tottenham Hotspur in 1996-1997 with disappointing early exits from both domestic cup competitions and an uninspiring 10th place finish in the Premier League, finishing with 15 fewer points compared to the previous season. A 7-1 thrashing away at Newcastle United in December remains the club’s biggest-ever Premier League loss.

 

1997-1998

Gerry Francis aimed to ease concerns from the supporters by signing the Newcastle pair Les Ferdinand and David Ginola in pre-season but saw skipper Teddy Sheringham depart for Manchester United. Tottenham started the season poorly and 11 days after a 4-0 reverse at Anfield to Liverpool FC, Francis elected to resign from his position as manager. He was replaced by the relatively unknown Christian Gross, who became a scapegoat from the British press from the moment he arrived kissing a tube ticket at his unveiling!

Jurgen Klinsmann did arrive for a second spell from Sampdoria at the end of December and his four goals away at Wimbledon in a 6-2 victory at the start of May guaranteed Tottenham’s top-flight safety. However, finishing 14th was not good enough for the frustrated supporters and owner Alan Sugar. Gross already looked on borrowed time.

 

1998-1999

Three games into the new season and Christian Gross was fired by Alan Sugar after a year where his confidence and morale had been destroyed. Sugar then pursued the Leeds boss George Graham and compensation was eventually agreed between the clubs for Graham to take over at the start of October. For the fans, ex-Arsenal boss Graham was not a popular choice and it further soured the relationship between the chairman and the supporters.

Tottenham finished 11th in the Premier League but did achieve silverware with a late victory over Leicester City in the League Cup final thanks to Allan Nielsen’s strike. Tottenham did beat Liverpool FC and Manchester United on their way to the final.

 

1999-2000

Tottenham did top the Premier League table after four games but ultimately hovered around the mid-table positions again, ending an unremarkable 10th in the final standings. They did enjoy home victories over Arsenal and Manchester United though and also recorded a spectacular 7-2 win against Southampton in March where joint-top scorer Steffen Iversen scored a hat-trick.

 

2000-2001

A club-record fee was paid in the summer to acquire the services of Ukrainian forward Sergei Rebrov and Rebrov responded with nine Premier League goals but Tottenham failed to shift themselves out of the mid-table reaches, finishing 12th. In March, George Graham was sacked for breach of contract by the club’s new owners and he was replaced by the fans preferred choice, Glenn Hoddle who walked out on Southampton to take the vacancy at a club he served notably as a player in the 1980s.

One piece of history was achieved in December. During a 3-3 draw away at Bradford City, Ledley King scored what remains the fastest-ever goal in Premier League history.

 

2001-2002

Glenn Hoddle bought in international experience in the summer of 2001 with the arrivals of Christian Ziege, Gus Poyet and Teddy Sheringham, who returned for a second spell after four trophy-laden years at Manchester United. Tottenham’s highlight of the season was reaching the League Cup final, winning 5-1 in the semi-finals, second leg against London rivals Chelsea but they lost the final 2-1 to Blackburn Rovers. That ended European hopes for the season as league form again flattered to deceive. Tottenham wound up in ninth position.

 

2002-2003

The transfer deadline day arrival of Robbie Keane for £7 million from Leeds United was seen as a potential uplift in Hoddle’s fortunes at Tottenham, particularly after they ended August top of the table with 10 points from their first four matches. Keane finished as top scorer with 13, including a tremendous hat-trick in a 4-3 win over Everton in mid-January. However, it was another disappointing season for Spurs, who lost 16 Premier League matches and finished 10th.

 

2003-2004

After achieving just one victory in the first six league matches of the seasons, Glenn Hoddle’s time as manager was brought to an end in September. His last game was a 3-1 home defeat to Southampton – the club Hoddle had left behind to take the Tottenham job. David Pleat moved downstairs to guide Tottenham through the rest of the season and they ended 14th. There was little to shout about for the fans, although both Freddie Kanoute and Jermain Defoe did impress in their debut seasons at the club after arriving from West Ham United.

 

2004-2005

New Sporting Director Frank Arnesen and Head Coach Jacques Santini were appointed in the summer as big parts of a new management restructure but in early November, Santini resigned because of personal reasons after managing just 12 first-team matches. His assistant manager Martin Jol replaced him and led the club to their best Premier League run at the time of five successive victories. Spurs finished in ninth position as Jol laid down the foundations for a more consistent regular tilt at European qualification via the league.

 

2005-2006

2005-2006 was a case of so near, yet so far for Tottenham. They enjoyed a great campaign and for the majority of the season, looked set for a top four finish and therefore, a place in the UEFA Champions League. Robbie Keane was top scorer with 16 goals, whilst Edgar Davids impressed greatly in this first season in English football.

On the eve of the final match of the campaign at Upton Park, a number of Tottenham players were taken ill with suspected food poisoning after eating lasagne. The club called in the police and even appealed for a later kick-off time which was denied by the Premier League. Needing a win to secure that fourth spot, Tottenham had a sickening day, losing 2-1 to West Ham and this allowed bitter rivals Arsenal in to snatch fourth place as the Gunners beat Wigan Athletic 4-2 on Highbury’s last day.

 

2006-2007

Tottenham strengthened their attacking options with the arrival of Dimitar Berbatov for £10.6 million from Bayer 04 Leverkusen but injuries and erratic form in the first half of the campaign left the club in mid-table and nowhere near challenging the top four positions as they had in the previous season. Jol’s team improved greatly after a 4-0 home loss to Manchester United in early February, winning eight of their last 12 matches to finish fifth for the second successive season. They also reached the quarter-finals of the UEFA Cup before losing to eventual winners Sevilla, whilst Paul Robinson became only the third-ever goalkeeper to score in the Premier League with his 80-yard lob against Watford in March.

 

2007-2008

In the summer of 2007, chairman Daniel Levy was understood to have approached Sevilla boss Juande Ramos about taking over as first-team manager. This ruined Martin Jol’s creditability as an authoritative figure in the dressing room and after a poor start with just one victory recorded over hapless Derby County in their first 10 Premier League games, Jol was sacked shortly after a UEFA Cup loss to Getafe. Ramos eventually took over and guided Tottenham to League Cup glory with victory over Chelsea. January arrival Jonathan Woodgate won the match and it softened the blow of a lacklustre league campaign which saw them down in 11th position at the season’s end.

Tottenham were involved in some high-scoring matches, drawing 4-4 with both Aston Villa and Chelsea and beating Reading 6-4.

 

2008-2009

For the second successive season, Spurs sacked their manager in October. After just amassing two points from their first eight matches, Juande Ramos was dismissed after a damaging 2-1 loss to Stoke City which saw Vedran Corluka end in hospital and both Gareth Bale and Michael Dawson sent off. He was replaced by Harry Redknapp and he immediately led a revival, with an amazing 4-4 draw away at Arsenal, followed by a 2-1 victory at home to Liverpool FC.

Tottenham remained in relegation danger until February but the returns of Jermain Defoe and Robbie Keane in the transfer window from Portsmouth and Liverpool FC respectively helped Tottenham recover from their awful start to finish a creditable eighth in the table.

 

2009-2010

2009-2010 was a real breakthrough season for Tottenham Hotspur. They accumulated 70 points which was their highest total at the time in a Premier League season and returned to the pinnacle level of European club football for the first time since 1962. By finishing fourth, Harry Redknapp led the club to UEFA Champions League qualification for the first time in their history. Qualification was sealed by a 1-0 away victory at closest challengers Manchester City.

With 18 goals, Jermain Defoe finished as top scorer and five of those strikes came against Wigan Athletic in a 9-1 victory in November – Tottenham’s biggest-ever Premier League victory.

 

2010-2011

Tottenham reached the quarter-finals of their maiden UEFA Champions League campaign before bowing out to Real Madrid. In the Premier League, they finished in fifth place and eight points adrift of their points tally from the previous season. The high in the league season came at The Emirates in November, coming from 2-0 down to win 3-2 at Arsenal and record a first away win at Arsenal in 18 years. This was also Gareth Bale’s breakthrough season. Bale put in some special performances throughout the campaign that ended with him winning PFA Players’ Player of the Year.

 

2011-2012

After two heavy defeats to the Manchester clubs to start the season, Tottenham enjoyed an 11-match unbeaten run, winning 10 of those games to climb into third place in the Premier League table. In February, manager Harry Redknapp was touted as heavy favourite for the England job after Fabio Capello’s resignation. He was also cleared of tax evasion charges at the same time. Tottenham supporters pleaded for Redknapp to stay but ultimately, the FA decided to appoint West Bromwich Albion manager, Roy Hodgson.

Tottenham’s form fell apart after a collapse in the North London Derby at The Emirates where they threw away a 2-0 lead to lose 5-2. Damaging defeats to Queens Park Rangers and Norwich City saw them finish in fourth place and below Arsenal in the table. Chelsea’s victory in the UEFA Champions League final denied Tottenham another shot at the Champions League for the next campaign and in June, Redknapp parted ways with the club by mutual consent.

 

2012-2013

Former Chelsea boss Andre Villas-Boas was appointed as Redknapp’s successor and he guided Tottenham to their best-ever points tally in a Premier League season of 72 points. He also got the best out of Bale, who scored 26 goals in all competitions and was crowned PFA Players’ Player of the Year for the second time in three years, edging out current holder Robin van Persie to the main prize. However, Tottenham missed out again on Champions League football on the final day. Arsenal’s victory at Newcastle meant Spurs finished fifth and Bale looked set to leave after his stunning individual campaign.

 

2013-2014

As had been widely predicted, Gareth Bale was sold in August for a world-record transfer fee of £85.3 million to Real Madrid. Tottenham spent the money of several new additions including the likes of Paulinho, Roberto Soldado and Etienne Capoue. However, apart from Christian Eriksen – none of the new arrivals made much of a positive impression.

Although Tottenham conceded just two goals in the first two months of the season, a 3-0 home defeat to West Ham United sparked off a worrying run of form which ultimately culminated in the dismissal of Andre Villas-Boas in mid-December. Two damaging heavy defeats – 6-0 at Manchester City and 5-0 at home to Liverpool FC were the final performances that forced Daniel Levy into the decision to sack the Portuguese.

Tim Sherwood replaced him and despite some more capitulating performances at Stamford Bridge and Anfield, he did steady the team and Tottenham finished sixth in the table. However, Sherwood was dismissed shortly after the season concluded with Levy having already identified his successor.

 

2014-2015

After a fine 18 months as Southampton’s boss, Mauricio Pochettino was tempted away from the south coast to take the role on as Tottenham Hotspur manager. This was another season of transition which ultimately saw Spurs improve by one position on the 2013-2014 campaign, finishing fifth.

Highs included a memorable 5-3 victory over champions Chelsea and a thrilling North London Derby success at White Hart Lane against Arsenal in February. The season also saw the remarkable breakthrough of Harry Kane who scored 21 league goals in his first full season in the Tottenham first-team. Kane’s efforts saw him crowned PFA Young Player of the Year.

 

2015-2016

Tottenham started the season with a narrow defeat at Old Trafford to Manchester United and actually went winless in the first month of the campaign. However, Mauricio Pochettino’s side were about to enjoy a breathtaking season that saw them become genuine title contenders for the first time in the Premier League Years.

Spurs lost just six times all season, recorded a famous league double over Manchester City, whilst Kane held off Jamie Vardy and Sergio Aguero to claim his first Golden Boot with 25 goals. Dele Alli’s debut season saw him score 10 times and succeed Kane as winner of PFA Young Player of the Year as Tottenham pushed Leicester City virtually all the way in the race for the most surprising Premier League title winner.

Ultimately, they fell short on a bad-tempered evening at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea came from 2-0 down to earn the point that ensured Leicester became champions. Tottenham’s rage exploded with every single outfield player booked on the night and Mousa Dembele earning a lengthy FA suspension after eye-gouging Diego Costa. They didn’t recover from this stormy evening and a 5-1 final day collapse at already relegated Newcastle meant Arsenal pipped them to the runners-up position, confirming a 22nd consecutive campaign they’d finish above their rivals from across the capital.

 

2016-2017

The final season at White Hart Lane turned into an unbeaten campaign. Tottenham dropped just four points on their home patch all season and lost only four games in the whole season. They claimed second position in the Premier League table in mid-January and never relinquished it, recording their best tallies for goals, wins, points and finishing position in the process. They finished seven points shy of Chelsea’s final total.

Pochettino continued to win widespread praise for the development and emergence of his young squad with Kane once again winning the Golden Boot and becoming only the second player in Premier League history to score four hat-tricks in a season.

White Hart Lane was demolished after the 2-1 victory against Manchester United in mid-May, to be replaced by a state-of-the-art new stadium near to the same site.

 

2017-2018

Tottenham moved to Wembley Stadium for the 2017-2018 campaign and initially found the going tough at the ground, as they dropped home points to Burnley and Swansea City, whilst Chelsea claimed a 2-1 victory thanks to two Marcos Alonso goals.

However, it was another impressive season from the Lilywhites who comfortably finished above Arsenal for the second successive league season and achieved a third consecutive finish in the top three. UEFA Champions League football was secured in the final week of the season with a narrow 1-0 victory over Newcastle United.

2017-2018 also saw the end of the barren wait for a Premier League win at Stamford Bridge. Two goals from Dele Alli helped Spurs to a 3-1 win in west London in April – their first win at the ground since February 1990. Kane scored another 30 goals but was pipped this time to the Golden Boot by Liverpool FC’s Mohamed Salah.

 

2018-2019

Delays to the new stadium have meant Tottenham have remained at Wembley Stadium for the 2018-2019 season and incredibly, they haven’t drawn a match in the Premier League this season. It has been wins or losses this term and Spurs remain as a potential title challenger in mid-February, keeping Liverpool FC and Manchester City honest.

Among the highlights already this season were a 3-1 win over Chelsea in November, a 6-2 masterclass at Goodison Park against Everton and a late winner from Harry Winks in a London Derby away at Fulham. With progression to the quarter-finals of the UEFA Champions League looking likely, Tottenham supporters still have plenty of excitement to witness in this campaign.

The Clubs: Sheffield United

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
122 32 36 54 128 168 -40 132 3

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Carl Bradshaw 72
Paul Beesley 64
Alan Kelly 63
Glyn Hodges 62
Paul Rogers 52
Dane Whitehouse 52
Kevin Gage 48
Mitch Ward 48
Alan Cork 46
Adrian Littlejohn 46

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Brian Deane 15
Adrian Littlejohn 11
Dane Whitehouse 10
Jostein Flo 9
Rob Hulse 8
Glyn Hodges 6
Paul Rogers 6
Nathan Blake 5
Alan Cork 5
Brian Gayle 5

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Sheffield United 6-0 Tottenham Hotspur 2nd March 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 3-0 Ipswich Town 16th January 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 3-0 West Ham United 14th April 2007 2006-2007
Sheffield United 4-2 Chelsea 8th May 1993 1992-1993
Coventry City 1-3 Sheffield United 24th March 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 3-1 Swindon Town 14th August 1993 1993-1994
Sheffield United 2-0 Southampton 3rd October 1992 1992-1993
Sheffield United 2-0 Middlesbrough 9th February 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 2-0 Oldham Athletic 22nd February 1993 1992-1993
Nottingham Forest 0-2 Sheffield United 1st May 1993 1992-1993

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Newcastle United 4-0 Sheffield United 24th November 1993 1993-1994
Liverpool FC 4-0 Sheffield United 24th February 2007 2006-2007
Manchester United 3-0 Sheffield United 18th August 1993 1993-1994
Sheffield United 0-3 Manchester United 7th December 1993 1993-1994
Arsenal 3-0 Sheffield United 29th December 1993 1993-1994
Arsenal 3-0 Sheffield United 23rd September 2006 2006-2007
Chelsea 3-0 Sheffield United 17th March 2007 2006-2007
Aston Villa 3-0 Sheffield United 5th May 2007 2006-2007
Everton 4-2 Sheffield United 21st August 1993 1993-1994
Leeds United 3-1 Sheffield United 17th October 1992 1992-1993

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Dave Bassett 2 12th December 1995
Neil Warnock 1 15th May 2007

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Sheffield United 1-2 Wigan Athletic 13th May 2007 32,604 2006-2007
Sheffield United 0-1 Manchester City 26th December 2006 32,591 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-2 Manchester United 18th November 2006 32,584 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-2 Newcastle United 7th April 2007 32,572 2006-2007
Sheffield United 0-2 Chelsea 28th October 2006 32,321 2006-2007
Sheffield United 2-1 Tottenham Hotspur 10th February 2007 32,144 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-0 Arsenal 30th December 2006 32,086 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-1 Everton 3rd March 2007 32,019 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-1 Liverpool FC 19th August 2006 31,726 2006-2007
Sheffield United 3-0 West Ham United 14th April 2007 31,593 2006-2007

 

Intro

It has been over 12 seasons since Sheffield United’s last dalliance with Premier League football. Their relegation on the final day of the 2006-2007 season was the second time the supporters had to deal with this heartache, having had destiny in their own hands to survive as they had on a dramatic last day in 1994. The Blades though do have the honour of scoring the first-ever goal in Premier League history thanks to Brian Deane’s fifth minute header against Manchester United in August 1992.

 

1992-1993

It was Dave Bassett who was Sheffield United manager when the Premier League began and despite working on limited resources, he kept the Blades away from relegation as they finished the inaugural campaign in 15th position, ahead of the likes of Coventry City, Southampton and reigning English champions, Leeds United.

They made Premier League history by scoring the first-ever goal in the new league on day one. Brian Deane scored it and the Yorkshire club surprised Manchester United, beating Alex Ferguson’s side 2-1. They also recorded their biggest-ever Premier League victory when Tottenham Hotspur was demolished 6-0 in March 1993. Other highlights included a Deane hat-trick to beat Ipswich 3-0 in January and victories in their final three matches, including a 2-0 success at The City Ground in Brian Clough’s final home match as manager of Nottingham Forest.

 

1993-1994

Deane had finished as top scorer in the previous campaign with 14 goals. However, he was sold in the summer of 1993 to Leeds United and goalscoring became a major problem in his absence in the 1993-1994 season. Norwegian Jostein Flo was the only player to amass double figures.

With little money to spend, Bassett’s side spent much of the campaign at the wrong end of the table but a 3-2 victory over West Ham United at the end of March started an impressive run of just one defeat in seven matches. Liverpool FC and Newcastle United were among the sides beaten in this period and that meant the Yorkshire side came into the final day of the season needing just a point to avoid relegation.

They took the lead twice against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge but were pegged back and in stoppage-time, Mark Stein scored a late winner for the home side. That goal was pivotal. Ipswich held on for a goalless draw at Blackburn and Everton’s dramatic comeback victory over Wimbledon meant Sheffield United were relegated to the First Division. They wouldn’t return to the Premier League for over 12 years.

 

2006-2007

Having finished runners-up to Reading in the Championship in the previous season, Sheffield United returned to the elite of English football with the charismatic Neil Warnock in-charge. An opening day draw with Liverpool FC was a good start and the Blades became tough to beat at Bramwall Lane. Their first victory back in the top-flight didn’t arrive until late September when a cracking Phil Jagielka shot beat Middlesbrough.

Jagielka was also the hero against Arsenal in the final match of 2006. He went in-goal after regular goalkeeper Paddy Kenny was injured but kept the Gunners out as the Blades recorded a 1-0 victory.

For much of the season, they were seven points clear of trouble but a torrid April and May meant they went into the final day still needing a point to guarantee safety. They played Wigan Athletic, who had to win or face relegation. Wigan took the lead but Jon Stead’s brave header saw the hosts equalise. However, a penalty was conceded in first half stoppage-time and David Unsworth, who had started the season as a Sheffield United player, scored for Wigan to put them infront.

Despite creating numerous openings in the second half, Sheffield United couldn’t find the goal they needed and they were relegated. The club then pursued a legal case against the FA for failing to deduct points from relegation rivals West Ham United for their part in the transfers involving Carlos Tevez and Javier Mascherano. Warnock resigned as manager three days after relegation.