Category Archives: The Clubs

The Clubs: Bradford City

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
76 14 20 42 68 138 -70 62 2

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Stuart McCall 71
Dean Windass 62
David Wetherall 56
Andy O’Brien 54
Peter Beagrie 52
Gunnar Halle 51
Robbie Blake 50
Wayne Jacobs 45
Dean Saunders 44
Jamie Lawrence 39

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Dean Windass 13
Peter Beagrie 8
Robbie Blake 6
Benito Carbone 5
Lee Mills 5
Jamie Lawrence 4
Ashley Ward 4
Eoin Jess 3
Dean Saunders 3
David Wetherall 3

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Bradford City 3-0 Wimbledon 30th April 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 3-1 Leicester City 23rd October 1999 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-0 Newcastle United 18th December 1999 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-0 Chelsea 22nd August 2000 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Charlton Athletic 13th April 2001 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Derby County 21st April 2001 2000-2001
Bradford City 3-2 Watford 22nd January 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-1 Arsenal 5th February 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-1 Coventry City 2nd December 2000 2000-2001
Leicester City 1-2 Bradford City 1st January 2001 2000-2001

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 6-0 Bradford City 5th September 2000 2000-2001
Leeds United 6-1 Bradford City 13th May 2001 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-4 Sunderland 2nd October 1999 1999-2000
Manchester United 4-0 Bradford City 26th December 1999 1999-2000
Coventry City 4-0 Bradford City 18th March 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 0-4 Manchester United 25th March 2000 1999-2000
Everton 4-0 Bradford City 15th April 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 1-4 Sunderland 26th December 2000 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-3 West Ham United 28th August 1999 1999-2000
Leicester City 3-0 Bradford City 6th May 2000 1999-2000

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Paul Jewell 1 18th June 2000
Chris Hutchings 1 6th November 2000
Jim Jefferies 1 24th December 2001

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Bradford City 0-2 Liverpool FC 1st May 2001 22,057 2000-2001
Bradford City 1-1 Middlesbrough 5th May 2001 20,921 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-3 Manchester United 13th January 2001 20,551 2000-2001
Bradford City 1-2 West Ham United 24th February 2001 20,469 2000-2001
Bradford City 1-4 Sunderland 26th December 2000 20,370 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-2 Newcastle United 31st March 2001 20,160 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-3 Aston Villa 3rd February 2001 19,591 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-2 Manchester City 17th March 2001 19,117 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Derby County 21st April 2001 18,564 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Newcastle United 18th December 1999 18,286 2000-2001

 

Intro

Bradford City were one of the more unlikely clubs to reach the Premier League when Paul Jewell guided them to promotion in May 1999. The Bantams were tipped by many to go straight back down but a final day victory over Liverpool FC ensured survival for a second top-flight campaign. A messy 2000-2001 season saw relegation follow and the club have experienced tough times since, including a spell in the fourth-tier of English football and administration but they did reach the League Cup final against the odds in 2012-2013.

 

1999-2000

Bradford made a wonderful start to their maiden Premier League campaign as Dean Saunders’ late winner saw them defeat Middlesbrough on the opening day of the season at The Riverside Stadium. They were gifted another away victory a month later at Derby County by a Horacio Carbonari own goal but they managed just two more victories before Christmas. As anticipated, Bradford spent most of the season at the wrong end of the table and also lost a thrilling contest at West Ham 5-4, despite leading 4-2 at one point. However, they unexpectedly beat Arsenal and three wins from their last four games saw them edge out Wimbledon and maintain their place in the top-flight.

Dean Windass finished as top goalscorer, having also netted in the win over the Gunners and David Wetherall’s header beat Liverpool FC at Valley Parade on the last day to create unbridled joy at the ground. The win was tempered a month later when Paul Jewell walked out on the club to take charge of relegated Sheffield Wednesday.

 

2000-2001

It was Jewell’s assistant, Chris Hutchings who would take charge of the club in 2000-2001 and they spent money to bring in the likes of Benito Carbone, Dan Petrescu and David Hopkin to the club. They beat Chelsea 2-0 in their first home match of the season but that would be the only victory Hutchings would experience as manager.

He was sacked after a 2-0 defeat to Charlton Athletic in early November and replaced permanently by Jim Jefferies, who moved down from Scottish football. Bradford had dropped into the bottom three in mid-September and they would not escape the drop zone again for the remainder of the season. Jefferies only oversaw four victories in his 24 matches’ in-charge and their relegation was confirmed after defeat to Everton on 28th April.

He wasn’t helped by the departure during the season of Andy O’Brien to Newcastle United, Hopkin back to Crystal Palace and Dean Windass to Middlesbrough.

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The Clubs: Ipswich Town

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
202 57 53 92 219 312 -93 224 5

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
David Linighan 112
Geraint Williams 109
John Wark 101
Mick Stockwell 96
Chris Kiwomya 91
Matt Holland 76
Craig Forrest 74
Hermann Hreidarsson 74
Phil Whelan 74
Gavin Johnson 73

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Marcus Stewart 25
Chris Kiwomya 18
Ian Marshall 13
John Wark 13
Alun Armstrong 11
Marcus Bent 9
Jason Dozzell 7
Martijn Reuser 7
Finidi George 6
Bontcho Guentchev 6

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Ipswich Town 5-0 Sunderland 29th December 2001 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 4-1 Leicester City 2nd January 1995 1994-1995
Oldham Athletic 0-3 Ipswich Town 14th August 1993 1993-1994
Everton 0-3 Ipswich Town 30th September 2000 2000-2001
Ipswich Town 3-0 Tottenham Hotspur 30th December 2000 2000-2001
Southampton 0-3 Ipswich Town 2nd April 2001 2000-2001
Ipswich Town 4-2 Leeds United 3rd October 1992 1992-1993
Ipswich Town 3-1 Manchester City 12th December 1992 1992-1993
Ipswich Town 3-1 Norwich City 19th April 1993 1992-1993
Ipswich Town 3-1 Southampton 16th December 2000 2000-2001

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 9-0 Ipswich Town 4th March 1995 1994-1995
Ipswich Town 0-6 Liverpool FC 9th February 2002 2001-2002
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 Ipswich Town 23rd April 1994 1993-1994
Liverpool FC 5-0 Ipswich Town 11th May 2002 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-5 Arsenal 5th March 1994 1993-1994
Arsenal 4-0 Ipswich Town 11th September 1993 1993-1994
Leeds United 4-0 Ipswich Town 5th April 1995 1994-1995
Manchester United 4-0 Ipswich Town 22nd September 2001 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-4 Sheffield Wednesday 6th November 1993 1993-1994
Nottingham Forest 4-1 Ipswich Town 10th December 1994 1994-1995

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
John Lyall 3 5th December 1994
George Burley 3 11th October 2002

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Ipswich Town 0-1 Manchester United 27th April 2002 28,433 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 0-0 Chelsea 1st April 2002 28,053 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-0 Middlesbrough 24th April 2002 25,979 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 0-6 Liverpool FC 9th February 2002 25,608 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-3 Southampton 2nd March 2002 25,440 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 0-0 Aston Villa 23rd March 2002 25,247 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-0 Fulham 30th January 2002 25,156 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 2-1 Tottenham Hotspur 12th January 2002 25,077 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 2-1 Manchester City 7th May 2001 25,004 2000-2001
Ipswich Town 0-1 Newcastle United 9th December 2001 24,748 2001-2002

Intro

Ipswich Town were the last champions of the old Second Division before the formation of the FA Premier League in 1992. The Tractor Boys were a side who might have lacked world-class players but had an abundance of team spirit. This meant they ensured top-flight football remained at Portman Road until 1995. They returned to the Premier League in 2000 for a two-season spell which saw them record a fine fifth-place finish in 2000-2001 before a crushing relegation just one season later.

1992-1993

Ipswich’s reward for winning the Second Division title in 1992-1993 was a place in the inaugural Premier League season. They made an impressive start, staying unbeaten in their first eight matches, even though six of those games ended in draws. By January, they sat as high as fourth in the table and even defeated Manchester United 2-1 at Portman Road.

However, the win over the Red Devils was their last successin 13 and saw the club plummet to 17th in the table. A crucial 3-1victory over East Anglia rivals Norwich City in April with Jason Dozzellscoring twice helped Ipswich achieve their aim of survival, just three pointsclear of the drop zone.

1993-1994

Ipswich dealt with the blow of selling Jason Dozzell to Tottenham Hotspur in the summer initially very well and new signing Ian Marshall made a great start. The summer arrival from Oldham Athletic scored in his first three games as Ipswich recorded victories over the Latics, Southampton and Chelsea, without conceding a goal.

In November, they held Manchester United to a goalless draw at Old Trafford and by New Year’s Day, they sat in the top half, having lost only six of their first 22 games. However, there was little joy in 1994. John Lyall’s team recorded just two further victories and slipped into the relegation battle. On the final day of the season, they managed a goalless draw at Ewood Park against Blackburn Rovers.

However, they would have been relegated but for a late Mark Stein goal at Stamford Bridge which ensured Sheffield United lost at Chelsea and meant they went down rather than Ipswich.

1994-1995

After avoiding relegation by the skin of their teeth on the final day of the 1993-1994 season, Ipswich’s luck ran out this season. Although there were early season victories over Queens Park Rangers and Manchester United, Ipswich weren’t able to sustain any consistent form. They were in the bottom four from October onwards and two months later, manager John Lyall resigned as first-team boss.

Former full-back George Burley, who had played a big part in the successful era the club enjoyed during Sir Bobby Robson’s spell, returned to the club as manager. Ipswich did record a surprising 1-0 victory at Anfield over Liverpool FC in mid-January but survival was virtually impossible. In March, they fell victim to a 9-0 beating at Old Trafford against Manchester United which remains the biggest-ever defeat in Premier League history.

Relegation was confirmed over the Easter weekend and Ipswich ultimately finished bottom of the 22-team table, conceding 93 goals and recording just seven league victories.

2000-2001

After an absence of five seasons, Ipswich finally returned to the top-flight as play-off winners in 2000 and they spectacularly surpassed expectations. Considered as one of the pre-season favourites for the drop, Ipswich defied the critics time and again. They lost just three home matches all season and never relinquished a position inside the top six after a 2-0 victory away at Bradford City in late October.

A 3-1 home victory over the Bantams in early March took Ipswich into the dizzy heights of third position and it was a spot they held for over seven weeks. Marcus Stewart was a revelation and his 19 goals meant he finished runner-up in the race for the Golden Boot.

Ultimately, the experience of Liverpool FC and Leeds United wore down Ipswich and a 2-1 defeat to Charlton Athletic meant Ipswich were squeezed into fifth spot at the season’s end. Nevertheless, they spectacularly exceeded expectations, earning UEFA Cup football for the first time since 1982 and George Burley’s achievements meant he deservedly won the LMA Manager of the Year award.

2001-2002

£8 million was spent on new players in the summer of 2001 with the likes of Finidi George and Matteo Sereni arriving at the club. However, Ipswich were about to fall victim to the curse of “second season syndrome.” A 3-1 victory over Derby County on the 21st August was their only win in their first 18 games and left them rooted to the bottom of the Premier League table. Not even a 1-0 victory over Inter Milan in the UEFA Cup could lift the gloom around Portman Road.

Winter looked bleak but Ipswich then hit a purple patch. A late win at White Hart Lane over Tottenham Hotspur just days before Christmas started a glorious run of seven wins in eight games. This included a 5-0 drubbing of Sunderland which remains the club’s biggest-ever Premier League victory.

Ipswich were upto 12th and at this point, a mid-table finish looked a real possibility. However, a soul-destroying 6-0 home beating by Liverpool FC knocked the stuffing out of the team. Ipswich recorded just one victory from their last 12 matches and six more points following the defeat by the Merseysiders. They arrived at Anfield on the last day needing a win to stand any chance of survival. That never looked likely and a 5-0 defeat ultimately consigned them to relegation.

George Burley resigned five months later and Ipswich have rarely looked like escaping the Championship since. Paul Lambert has just been appointed manager but he’ll have a job on his hands to keep Ipswich in the second-tier of English football.

The Clubs: Portsmouth

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
266 79 65 122 292 380 -88 293 7

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Matt Taylor 144
David James 134
Richard Hughes 114
Linvoy Primus 113
Dejan Stefanovic 112
Sean Davis 102
Kanu 102
Gary O’Neil 101
Sol Campbell 95
Lomana Lualua 87

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Yakubu 29
Benjani 19
Lomana Lualua 19
Kanu 17
Jermain Defoe 16
Matt Taylor 16
Gary O’Neil 11
Peter Crouch 10
Niko Kranjcar 9
Teddy Sheringham 9

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Portsmouth 6-1 Leeds United 8th November 2003 2003-2004
Portsmouth 5-1 Middlesbrough 15th May 2004 2003-2004
Portsmouth 4-0 Bolton Wanderers 26th August 2003 2003-2004
Middlesbrough 0-4 Portsmouth 28th August 2006 2006-2007
Portsmouth 4-0 Wigan Athletic 31st October 2009 2009-2010
Portsmouth 7-4 Reading 29th September 2007 2007-2008
Portsmouth 4-1 Southampton 23rd April 2005 2004-2005
Sunderland 1-4 Portsmouth 29th October 2005 2005-2006
Newcastle United 1-4 Portsmouth 3rd November 2007 2007-2008
Portsmouth 3-0 Blackburn Rovers 19th August 2006 2006-2007

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester City 6-0 Portsmouth 21st September 2008 2008-2009
Birmingham City 5-0 Portsmouth 21st January 2006 2005-2006
Manchester United 5-0 Portsmouth 6th February 2010 2009-2010
Portsmouth 0-5 Chelsea 24th March 2010 2009-2010
Arsenal 4-0 Portsmouth 28th December 2005 2005-2006
Chelsea 4-0 Portsmouth 17th August 2008 2008-2009
Liverpool FC 4-1 Portsmouth 22nd December 2007 2007-2008
Portsmouth 1-4 West Ham United 26th December 2008 2008-2009
Arsenal 4-1 Portsmouth 22nd August 2009 2009-2010
Portsmouth 1-4 Manchester United 28th November 2009 2009-2010

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Harry Redknapp 2 24th November 2004
Velimir Zajec 1 10th October 2005
Alain Perrin 2 24th November 2005
Harry Redknapp 4 25th October 2008
Tony Adams 1 9th February 2009
Paul Hart 2 24th November 2009
Avram Grant 1 30th June 2010

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Portsmouth 1-2 Tottenham Hotspur 17th October 2009 20,821 2009-2010
Portsmouth 0-0 Arsenal 26th December 2007 20,556 2007-2008
Portsmouth 0-1 Manchester United 25th August 2008 20,540 2008-2009
Portsmouth 2-0 Liverpool FC 19th December 2009 20,534 2009-2010
Portsmouth 0-1 Fulham 11th May 2008 20,532 2007-2008
Portsmouth 0-0 West Ham United 27th October 2007 20,525 2007-2008
Portsmouth 2-3 Liverpool FC 7th February 2009 20,524 2008-2009
Portsmouth 0-1 Tottenham Hotspur 15th December 2007 20,520 2007-2008
Portsmouth 1-1 Manchester United 15th August 2007 20,510 2007-2008
Portsmouth 0-0 Newcastle United 12th April 2008 20,507 2007-2008

 

Intro

Portsmouth made their Premier League debut in 2004 and were one of the most successful clubs to achieve consistency in the top 10 of the top-flight after promotion. That was during the second of Harry Redknapp’s managerial spells at the club which culminated in FA Cup success in 2008. However, Pompey were piling up the debt and when Redknapp left for Tottenham Hotspur in October 2008, everything started to spiral out of control. In February 2010, they became the first Premier League club to enter voluntarily administration, earning a nine-point deduction and guaranteeing relegation. Another administration has followed since and a demise to League Two but recent signs are that the Fratton Park club are on their way back up the league pyramid.

 

2003-2004

Portsmouth made their Premier League bow in 2003-2004 and under the guidance of the experienced Harry Redknapp, they made a brilliant start. They collected nine points from their first five matches, including a 1-1 draw at Highbury with Arsenal and a 4-0 trouncing of Bolton Wanderers which took them briefly to the top of the table. A crippling injury list and woeful away form sent them spiralling down the table but Yakubu’s winner in March’s South Coast Derby against Southampton spearheaded a wonderful run. Portsmouth secured safety in early May and finished a creditable 13th, ahead of the likes of Blackburn Rovers, Manchester City and Everton in the final standings.

 

2004-2005

Early season form in 2004-2005 included a home win over Manchester United and earned Redknapp October’s Manager of the Month award. However, things were not rosy between Harry and chairman Milan Mandaric. Mandaric’s decision to bring in a Director of Football in Velimir Zajec saw Redknapp decide to walk out on the club and turn up at South Coast rivals Southampton a fortnight later.

Zajec took over until early April, when Frenchman Alain Perrin was confirmed as permanent manager. A joyous 4-1 victory over Southampton on Redknapp’s first return to Fratton Park not only secured Portsmouth’s survival but provided an afternoon the home supporters would not forget.

 

2005-2006

After just four league victories from 20 games, Alain Perrin was sacked in November by Mandaric. Mandaric then patched things up with Redknapp, who was on the lookout to return after his Southampton experience had turned sour. He returned in early December with the club in real danger of losing its Premier League status and that looked very likely when they slipped seven points adrift of safety in early March.

However, two cracking goals from Pedro Mendes in a 2-1 home victory over Manchester City sparked another amazing run of form that saw the club lose only two of their last nine matches. Survival was secured by a comeback victory on the penultimate weekend of the season at Wigan Athletic. Redknapp would later say this was one of his “best achievements” in football.

 

2006-2007

In September 2006, Milan Mandaric left Portsmouth and Alexandre Gaydamak took over as owner of the club. He provided Redknapp with extra transfer funds and experience arrived at the club with the likes of Sol Campbell and David James among the new arrivals. Portsmouth topped the table in mid-September and finished ninth to record their highest top-flight finish since the 1950s. They only missed out on UEFA Cup qualification on the final day of the season after a goalless draw with Arsenal.

 

2007-2008

In October 2007, Redknapp signed an extended contract as manager and Portsmouth were becoming a very attractive side to watch. This was highlighted by both the amazing 7-4 victory over Reading and the arrival of Jermain Defoe in the January transfer window from Tottenham Hotspur. Portsmouth improved on their ninth-place finish of the previous season to finish eighth this time around. However, it was their FA Cup run that made the headlines.

A quarter-final victory over eventual league champions Manchester United was the highlight of a run that took Portsmouth to the final. Kanu scored the only goal of the game against Championship outfit Cardiff City in the showpiece event at Wembley Stadium to earn Portsmouth the 2008 FA Cup. Redknapp became the last English manager to win a major trophy to the present day.

 

2008-2009

The FA Cup victory took Portsmouth into European competition as they competed in the UEFA Cup and the highlight of their run was a 2-2 draw with the mighty AC Milan, although they did lead 2-0 in the contest.

However, the club was rocked by Harry Redknapp’s sudden departure towards the end of October to fill the vacancy at Tottenham Hotspur. Redknapp’s assistant, Tony Adams took charge but he was sacked in February after a run of just two victories in 16 games. Youth team coach Paul Hart was upgraded to the managerial role and he guided Portsmouth to safety as they finished in 14th place.

 

2009-2010

In late May 2009, Alexandre Gaydamak sold the club to Sulaiman Al Fahim, who had previously come to prominence by fronting the takeover of Manchester City. There was concern over Portsmouth’s finances with the summer departures of Glen Johnson, Peter Crouch, Sylvain Distin and Niko Kranjcar for vast sums of money.

In early October, the club admitted the players had not been paid and by now, Portsmouth’s financial situation was serious. Al Fahim sold the club to Ali al-Faraj and the club was now a mess. Performances on-the-pitch weren’t great either. Portsmouth lost their first seven matches and a 1-0 defeat at Stoke City in late November saw Hart’s tenure as manager come to an end. He was replaced by Avram Grant and although form did improve, Portsmouth were fighting a losing battle on two fronts.

Approximately £135 million in debt, the club went into voluntarily administration in February to avoid a winding-up order. This meant a nine-point deduction which virtually confirmed their relegation from the top-flight. A run to the FA Cup final where they lost to Chelsea did offer some light relief for the long-suffering supporters but it was a season where Portsmouth’s financial ruin had taken the club to the brink of extinction.

They are now in League One and setting the pace at 1/3 distance. The club seem to be on their way back, now owned by Michael Eisner, former chairman of The Walt Disney Company.

The Clubs: Middlesbrough

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
574 165 169 240 648 794 -146 661 14

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Mark Schwarzer 332
Stewart Downing 211
Robbie Mustoe 197
George Boateng 181
Gareth Southgate 160
Colin Cooper 159
Steve Vickers 155
Franck Queudrue 150
Curtis Fleming 146
Ugo Ehiogu 126

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Juninho 30
Hamilton Ricard 30
Mark Viduka 26
Yakubu 24
Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 23
Szilard Nemeth 23
Alen Boksic 22
Brian Deane 18
Stewart Downing 18
Massimo Maccarone 18

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Middlesbrough 8-1 Manchester City 11th May 2008 2007-2008
Middlesbrough 6-1 Derby County 5th March 1997 1996-1997
Middlesbrough 5-1 Derby County 3rd November 2001 2001-2002
Middlesbrough 5-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd May 2003 2002-2003
Middlesbrough 5-1 Bolton Wanderers 20th January 2007 2006-2007
Middlesbrough 4-0 Coventry City 7th September 1996 1996-1997
Middlesbrough 4-0 Sheffield Wednesday 3rd October 1998 1998-1999
Middlesbrough 4-0 Derby County 13th January 2001 2000-2001
Blackburn Rovers 0-4 Middlesbrough 16th October 2004 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 4-0 West Bromwich Albion 23rd April 2005 2004-2005

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 7-0 Middlesbrough 14th January 2006 2005-2006
Middlesbrough 1-6 Arsenal 24th April 1999 1998-1999
Chelsea 5-0 Middlesbrough 5th February 1996 1995-1996
Everton 5-0 Middlesbrough 17th February 1999 1998-1999
Middlesbrough 0-5 Chelsea 18th October 2008 2008-2009
Aston Villa 5-1 Middlesbrough 17th January 1993 1992-1993
Liverpool FC 5-1 Middlesbrough 14th December 1996 1996-1997
Arsenal 5-1 Middlesbrough 20th November 1999 1999-2000
Portsmouth 5-1 Middlesbrough 15th May 2004 2003-2004
Chelsea 4-0 Middlesbrough 3rd April 1993 1992-1993

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Lennie Lawrence 1 19th May 1994
Bryan Robson 5 6th December 2000
Terry Venables 1 12th June 2001
Steve McClaren 5 11th May 2006
Gareth Southgate 3 20th October 2009
Aitor Karanka 1 16th March 2017
Steve Agnew 1 9th June 2017

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Middlesbrough 0-0 Liverpool FC 22nd November 2003 35,100 2003-2004
Middlesbrough 2-0 Norwich City 28th December 2004 34,836 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 1-0 Newcastle United 5th March 2003 34,814 2002-2003
Middlesbrough 0-0 Leeds United 26th February 2000 34,800 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 1-1 Sunderland 6th November 1999 34,793 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 1-0 Liverpool FC 21st August 1999 34,783 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 3-4 Manchester United 10th April 2000 34,775 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 1-0 Tottenham Hotspur 7th May 2005 34,766 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 2-0 Liverpool FC 20th November 2004 34,751 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 1-0 Liverpool FC 9th November 2002 34,747 2002-2003

 

Intro

Middlesbrough have featured in 14 Premier League seasons and have often been an entertaining side. Their debut season was at Ayresome Park which ended with relegation but moving into The Riverside Stadium in August 1995 gave them the platform to become a regular mid-table team. A controversial relegation in 1997 did set them back but Boro bounced back quickly and remained in the elite until 2009. The fans have had the likes of Juninho, Fabrizio Ravanelli, Gazika Mendieta and Yakubu to enjoy during the Premier League Years.

 

1992-1993

Middlesbrough had won promotion in the previous season to become among the 22 founder members of the Premier League. They started well, winning four of their first seven games including a 4-1 victory over reigning champions Leeds United. A 1-0 loss to Crystal Palace just before the New Year though saw the club go into freefall from a mid-table position. They won just three matches after the turn of the year, collecting a meagre 10 points from 54. They were relegated on the penultimate weekend and finished second-bottom, five points adrift of safety.

 

1995-1996

This was a record-breaking season for Middlesbrough off-the-pitch. They moved into their new state-of-the-art Riverside Stadium and beat Chelsea in their first match at the ground in August 1995. Two months later, player-manager Bryan Robson managed to persuade the Brazilian Footballer of the Year Juninho to join the club which briefly turned the town into scenes that matched the colourful Rio carnival!

In late October, Middlesbrough peaked in fourth place after beating Queens Park Rangers 1-0 but they couldn’t keep up with their early tempo. An eight-game losing sequence saw Robson’s side plunge down the table but they still finished a creditable 12th, five points above safety.

 

1996-1997

In the summer of 1996, Middlesbrough recruited heavily as they signed Brazilian midfielder Emerson and Champions League winning-forward Fabrizio Ravanelli. Ravanelli sparkled instantly with a hat-trick on his debut against Liverpool FC in a 3-3 draw. Boro lost just twice in the opening two months and sat fourth but a 12-game winless sequence followed which would be very damaging for the club’s survival prospects.

In deep relegation trouble before Christmas, Middlesbrough failed to fulfil a fixture away at Blackburn Rovers due to a severe injury and illness crisis. Blackburn were incensed at the postponement at such short notice and the FA sided with them. In January, Middlesbrough were docked three points and fell seven points adrift of safety.

They went on a decent run afterwards but a fixtures pile-up saw them run out of steam in the closing weeks, despite going unbeaten in their last four matches. A 1-1 draw on the final day against Leeds United condemned them to relegation, despite herculean efforts from Juninho. Had those three points not been docked, they would have survived.

Two cup final defeats added to the agony for the supporters in what was a rollercoaster season that ended with a very nasty bump.

 

1998-1999

After one season away, Middlesbrough returned to the Premier League in 1998-1999 and achieved their highest top-flight finish in over 20 years. Bryan Robson’s side started very well and even enjoyed a 3-2 victory at Old Trafford over Manchester United in December which meant they were sitting in fourth place on Christmas Day. They lost just three games at The Riverside Stadium all season and claimed a final finishing position of ninth, drawing 15 of their 38 matches.

 

1999-2000

Although Middlesbrough fell three positions in the final standings compared to 1998-1999, they achieved one more point to finish with a new Premier League high of 52 points. Three wins from their first four games had Boro into the dizzy heights of second spot. They couldn’t quite maintain that position and even fell as low as 16th after a 4-0 loss on Valentine’s Day 2000 to Aston Villa.

A strong run of just two losses from their final 12 matches took the Teesiders clear of any relegation danger. For the second successive season, Hamilton Ricard was the top goalscorer for the club, scoring 12 times.

 

2000-2001

The 2000-2001 season was a frustrating one for Bryan Robson, Steve Gibson and everyone connected with Middlesbrough. Eight defeats in nine games saw Boro hit bottom spot in the table in mid-December and Gibson decided to act. He brought in former England boss Terry Venables to joint-manage the team alongside Robson. It worked as Middlesbrough recovered to finish 14th, despite just four home victories all season. A 3-0 away victory over Arsenal was the highlight of the campaign – a result that handed the 2000-2001 championship to Manchester United.

 

2001-2002

This was Steve McClaren’s first season in-charge of Middlesbrough after he left his post as Sir Alex Ferguson’s assistant at Manchester United. Things didn’t start well as the club lost their first four Premier League matches. However, a 2-0 home victory over West Ham United started a much better run of form. Just two defeats in their next 11 games took the Teesiders away from danger. McClaren’s side beat Manchester United at Old Trafford on their way to a final finishing position of 12th.

 

2002-2003

In early October, Middlesbrough peaked in third place in the table. Early victories included a 3-0 triumph at White Hart Lane against Tottenham Hotspur. The summer arrivals of Geremi, George Boateng and Massimo Maccarone had made the team harder to beat. However, a 1-0 loss at Charlton started a dreadful run of form away from home, which saw them lose eight successive away matches without scoring.

A 5-2 home defeat to Aston Villa in late January saw McClaren go on a deadline day splurge, signing Michael Ricketts from Bolton Wanderers and the Derby County pair of Malcolm Christie and Chris Riggott. Middlesbrough eventually finished in 11th and beat Manchester United and Liverpool FC during the campaign. However, it was a slightly disappointing result given their bright start.

 

2003-2004

Middlesbrough made an appalling start to the 2003-2004 campaign, losing four of their first five matches and collecting just one point in that period. It looked like a patchy season ahead but an unbeaten eight-game sequence in the winter months took them away from danger. For the second successive season, Boro finished in 11th place so it was another mediocre league campaign.

It was a historic season though for the club. For the first time in their 128-year history, they claimed silverware, beating Bolton Wanderers 2-1 in the League Cup final.

 

2004-2005

With Middlesbrough about to embark on a European campaign, there was plenty of experienced arrivals with Ray Parlour, Mark Viduka and Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink among the summer acquisitions. The club enjoyed their best-ever Premier League season, finishing in seventh position.

They found themselves up against Manchester City on the final day of the season with a point required to secure European qualification via the league. In stoppage-time, City won a penalty but Mark Schwarzer saved the spot-kick from Robbie Fowler to seal the point required that earned the club another season in the UEFA Cup.

 

2005-2006

After five years and 250 matches’ in-charge in all competitions, Steve McClaren left his position as manager at the end of the season to fill the vacancy as boss of the England national team. His final game saw the team compete in their first-ever European final, losing 4-0 in the UEFA Cup final to Spanish club Sevilla.

The league season was a major disappointment, finishing in a lowly 14th position, hurt by a succession of injuries and deep runs in three cup competitions. There were home victories against Arsenal, Manchester United and Chelsea but also defeats to the three newly-promoted clubs.

 

2006-2007

Club captain Gareth Southgate was appointed as McClaren’s successor for his first job in club management. His first home match in-charge was a memorable 2-1 victory over Chelsea whilst one of their most impressive displays came in January as top-four contenders Bolton Wanderers were well-beaten 5-1. However, poor away form hampered the ability for the club to escape the reaches of mid-table. Boro achieved just two away successes and finished 12th, eight points off the European positions and also eight points clear of any relegation danger.

 

2007-2008

The 2007-2008 season saw Middlesbrough play in their 4000th league game when they played Reading in March. They broke their transfer record in January to sign Afonso Alves for £12 million. Middlesbrough finished in 13th position and unrest seemed to be around the camp with three permanent captains appointed during the season. George Boateng, Julio Arca and Emanuel Pogatetz all took it in turns to wear the armband in a fairly unremarkable campaign for results.

 

2008-2009

Middlesbrough started the 2008-2009 season with their first opening day victory in eight years as they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 2-1. Two wins from their first three games hinted at a more positive season in the Premier League. In mid-November, the club were sitting in the mid-table positions but a 2-1 away victory at Aston Villa was their last success in 14 games. A shock 2-0 win over title challengers Liverpool FC stopped that sequence at the end of February. However, relegation was looking more likely as the season developed and just one more victory was achieved with the club’s 11-year Premier League tenure ending on the final day of the season.

 

2016-2017

After several seasons in the doldrums in the Championship, Middlesbrough managed to win promotion back to the top-flight in 2016. However, it would turn out to be a very tricky and ultimately, unsuccessful return to the Premier League. Despite having a strong defensive record, the attacking line-up was blunted by a lack of creativity. Middlesbrough scored just 27 goals in 38 matches which was the fewest of any of the 20 clubs in the campaign.

A run of 10 games without a win saw Aitor Karanka sacked as manager in early March after a 2-0 defeat to Stoke. Steve Agnew took interim charge until the end of the season but he couldn’t revive their fortunes. Relegation back to the Championship was confirmed by a 3-0 loss to eventual champions Chelsea on 8th May 2017.

The Clubs: Cardiff City

All-Time Premier League Record (upto 11th September 2018)

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
42 7 11 24 34 79 -45 32 2

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Steven Caulker 38
Fraizer Campbell 37
David Marshall 37
Jordon Mutch 35
Gary Medel 34
Peter Whittingham 32
Ben Turner 31
Kevin Theophile-Catherine 28
Kim Bo-Kyung 28
Aron Gunnarsson 23

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Jordon Mutch 7
Fraizer Campbell 6
Steven Caulker 5
Peter Whittingham 3
Craig Bellamy 2
Juan Cala 2
Kim Bo-Kyung 1
Victor Camarasa 1
Aron Gunnarsson 1
Kenwyne Jones 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Cardiff City 3-1 Fulham 8th March 2014 2013-2014
Cardiff City 3-2 Manchester City 25th August 2013 2013-2014
Fulham 1-2 Cardiff City 28th September 2013 2013-2014
Cardiff City 2-1 Norwich City 1st February 2014 2013-2014
Cardiff City 1-0 Swansea City 3rd November 2013 2013-2014

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Cardiff City 0-4 Hull City 22nd February 2014 2013-2014
Sunderland 4-0 Cardiff City 27th April 2014 2013-2014
Cardiff City 3-6 Liverpool FC 22nd March 2014 2013-2014
Chelsea 4-1 Cardiff City 19th October 2013 2013-2014
Cardiff City 0-3 Arsenal 30th November 2013 2013-2014

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Malky Mackay 1 27th December 2013
Ole Gunnar Solskjaer 1 18th September 2014
Neil Warnock 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Cardiff City 2-3 Arsenal 2nd September 2018 32,316 2018-2019
Cardiff City 0-0 Newcastle United 18th August 2018 30,720 2018-2019
Cardiff City 3-6 Liverpool FC 22nd March 2014 28,018 2013-2014
Cardiff City 2-2 Manchester United 24th November 2013 28,016 2013-2014
Cardiff City 0-3 Arsenal 30th November 2013 27,948 2013-2014

 

Intro

Cardiff City defied the expectations of many experts to earn promotion back to the Premier League for the 2018-2019 season, four years after their one-season dalliance in the top-flight which ended with a swift return to the Championship. Their sole full season did have a few highs but their relegation was unsurprising after a controversial decision was made by owner Vincent Tan to sack the manager, Malky Mackay. This time round, it is the experienced Neil Warnock in-charge and he will make the Bluebirds tough to beat.

 

2013-2014

Popular Scot Malky Mackay guided Cardiff City into the top-flight for the first time in the Premier League era as champions of the Championship. Mackay spent big to acquire the services of defensive midfielder Gary Medel and centre-back Steven Caulker. Both impressed but the overall quality of the squad wasn’t quite good enough to ultimately avoid an instant return to the second-tier.

Cardiff started well enough and no supporter will ever forget their first-ever Premier League home game at The Cardiff City Stadium. Big-spending Manchester City arrived and were expected to turn the Bluebirds over. However, Cardiff dominated the aerial battles and two headers from Fraizer Campbell helped the newcomers to a shock 3-2 victory. Unseen at the full-time whistle was a frosty reception given by owner Vincent Tan towards Mackay. It was already the beginning of the end for Mackay.

Cardiff did beat Swansea City 1-0 in the maiden Welsh Derby at Premier League level and drew at home with reigning champions Manchester United. However, hours before a trip to Anfield, an e-mail was leaked into the press from Tan telling Mackay to resign as boss or face being sacked. Mackay came out fighting after the 3-1 defeat to a Luis Suarez-inspired Liverpool FC side but a 3-0 home beating by Southampton on Boxing Day was the final blow. A day later, Tan sacked Mackay, much to the fans’ disgust. The real reasons for his sacking weren’t fully revealed until his application and sudden withdrawal for the vacant managerial position at Crystal Palace eight months later.

Ex-Manchester United scoring legend Ole Gunnar Solskjaer was appointed as new manager but the club were in a tailspin and he couldn’t guide them out of it either. Poor business in the January transfer window, including a swap deal with Stoke for Kenwyne Jones to arrive in-exchange for Peter Odemwingie didn’t help matters. Cardiff’s Premier League flame was extinguished on the final Saturday of the season when they lost 3-0 to Newcastle United. They finished bottom of the table with just seven wins to their name and 30 points. Solskjaer achieved just two league wins during his five-month reign as boss.

 

2018-2019

After a four-season absence, Cardiff returned to the top-flight and despite not winning any of their first four games, will scrap for every point possible. Goalkeeper Neil Etheridge has already shown his penalty-saving instincts, saving efforts from Callum Wilson and Kenedy in the season’s early weeks. The save from the latter in stoppage-time earned Cardiff a goalless draw with Newcastle United for their first point back in the big time.

The Bluebirds came from behind twice in their last match against Arsenal before being narrowly beaten 3-2 by the Gunners but Neil Warnock’s side will battle throughout and will win plenty of admirers throughout the season for the never-say-die attitude that the manager will demand from his players.

The Clubs: Fulham

All-Time Premier League Record

(Upto start of the 2018-2019 season)
Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
494 150 136 208 570 697 -127 586 13

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Brede Hangeland 217
Aaron Hughes 196
Clint Dempsey 189
Steed Malbranque 172
Mark Schwarzer 172
Danny Murphy 169
Luis Boa Morte 166
Zat Knight 150
Brian McBride 140
Simon Davies 137

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Clint Dempsey 50
Steed Malbranque 32
Brian McBride 32
Luis Boa Morte 26
Louis Saha 26
Collins John 20
Bobby Zamora 20
Dimitar Berbatov 19
Danny Murphy 18
Damien Duff 15

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Fulham 6-0 Norwich City 15th May 2005 2004-2005
Fulham 6-0 Queens Park Rangers 2nd October 2011 2011-2012
Fulham 6-1 West Bromwich Albion 11th February 2006 2005-2006
Fulham 5-0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 4th March 2012 2011-2012
Fulham 5-0 Norwich City 18th August 2012 2012-2013
Fulham 5-2 Newcastle United 21st January 2012 2011-2012
Fulham 4-1 Bolton Wanderers 17th August 2002 2002-2003
Newcastle United 1-4 Fulham 7th November 2004 2004-2005
Crystal Palace 1-4 Fulham 21st October 2013 2013-2014
Fulham 3-0 Bolton Wanderers 23rd April 2002 2001-2002

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Hull City 6-0 Fulham 28th December 2013 2013-2014
Fulham 0-5 Manchester United 21st December 2011 2011-2012
Manchester City 5-0 Fulham 22nd March 2014 2013-2014
Liverpool FC 5-1 Fulham 15th March 2006 2005-2006
Manchester United 5-1 Fulham 20th August 2006 2006-2007
Tottenham Hotspur 5-1 Fulham 26th December 2007 2007-2008
Tottenham Hotspur 4-0 Fulham 15th December 2001 2001-2002
Fulham 0-4 Blackburn Rovers 7th April 2003 2002-2003
Fulham 0-4 Arsenal 4th March 2006 2005-2006
Liverpool FC 4-0 Fulham 9th December 2006 2006-2007

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Jean Tigana 2 16th April 2003
Chris Coleman 5 10th April 2007
Lawrie Sanchez 2 21st December 2007
Roy Hodgson 3 30th June 2010
Mark Hughes 1 29th June 2011
Martin Jol 3 1st December 2013
Rene Meulensteen 1 13th February 2014
Felix Magath 1 18th September 2014
Slavisa Jokanovic 1

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Fulham 1-2 Aston Villa 11th February 2004 28,500 2003-2004
Fulham 1-1 West Bromwich Albion 1st February 2012 27,689 2011-2012
Fulham 0-1 Arsenal 26th September 2009 25,700 2009-2010
Fulham 3-1 Liverpool FC 31st October 2009 25,700 2009-2010
Fulham 3-0 Manchester United 19th December 2009 25,700 2009-2010
Fulham 1-1 Aston Villa 6th November 2010 25,700 2010-2011
Fulham 1-4 Manchester City 21st November 2010 25,700 2010-2011
Fulham 0-0 Aston Villa 13th August 2011 25,700 2011-2012
Fulham 0-5 Manchester United 21st December 2011 25,700 2011-2012
Fulham 2-1 Arsenal 2nd January 2012 25,700 2011-2012

 

Intro

Fulham enjoyed 13 seasons in the Premier League between 2001 and 2014. The Cottagers were guided into the big time by the owner of Harrods, Mohammed Al Fayed and he ensured the club remained a stable figure in their first decade at this level, which peaked with a seventh-place finish in 2009 under Roy Hodgson’s stewardship. They slipped out of the top-flight after a messy 2013-2014 campaign which saw three managers fail to guide them out of danger. However, after four seasons away, they returned to the promise land in-time for the 2018-2019 campaign.

 

2001-2002

Fulham’s 104th season in professional football was their first in the Premier League. They were led into this new environment by Jean Tigana, who had guided them to the First Division title in the previous season.

Among the high-profile arrivals was Dutch no.1 goalkeeper Edwin van der Sar from Juventus and owner Mohammed Al Fayed even boasted they could win the title! It was a totally unrealistic ambition but it gave fans the chance to dream. In the end, the Cottagers coped well in their debut season and finished in a solid, if slightly unspectacular 13th place in the final standings. They also reached the FA Cup semi-finals before losing to west London rivals Chelsea.

 

2002-2003

With Craven Cottage requiring redevelopment work to fit Premier League safety requirements, Fulham began this season in a temporary home, ground-sharing for two seasons with Queens Park Rangers at Loftus Road.

Four wins in their first eight games including a dramatic comeback from 2-0 down to beat Tottenham Hotspur 3-2 had them flying high in fourth but the league campaign quickly nosedived and contract disagreements between Al Fayed and Tigana led to the Frenchman’s abrupt departure in April 2003. Former skipper of the club, Chris Coleman, took charge on a caretaker basis and steered Fulham to safety and his 10-point haul from five games was enough to give him the job permanently.

Fulham finished 14th, just six points clear of safety but did experience a European campaign for the first time through success in the Intertoto Cup. They reached round three of the UEFA Cup before bowing out to Hertha Berlin.

 

2003-2004

Now the youngest manager in the top-flight, Chris Coleman impressed greatly in his first full season. The Welshman took Fulham into the top half of the table for the first time in their Premier League life, finishing in ninth position.

The Cottagers enjoyed a fabulous 3-1 victory at Old Trafford in October and a starring performance from Edwin van der Sar kept Arsenal out at Highbury a month later. Coleman had to deal with the blow of losing top goalscorer Louis Saha in the January transfer window to Manchester United but the west Londoners finished just four points shy of fifth-placed Newcastle United and with a positive goal difference.

 

2004-2005

With the likes of Andy Cole, Claus Jensen and Tomasz Radzinski arriving in the summer of 2004 and a return to Craven Cottage on the horizon, hopes were high for Fulham to build on their impressive 2003-2004 season. It didn’t quite materialise like that as Coleman found out how tough life was at the highest level.

Fulham finished eight points and four positions lower than their 2003-2004 tallies but were in no relegation danger throughout and their 6-0 thumping of Norwich City on the final day ultimately relegated the Norfolk side.

 

2005-2006

Fulham’s home form ensured another mid-table finish. They won 13 of their 19 matches at Craven Cottage with champions Chelsea and Liverpool FC among their victims. Unfortunately, they were restricted to a 12th place finish because of a diabolical away record.

Coleman’s team mustered just one away victory all season (2-1 at Manchester City) in April, whilst they were one of only three sides to lose during the season to bottom-placed Sunderland.

 

2006-2007

Despite a 5-1 loss on the opening weekend to Manchester United, Fulham started the season well, taking eight points from their next four matches. That was despite losing their big summer signing, Jimmy Bullard to a horrific knee injury in a 2-1 away win at Newcastle United.

The success on Tyneside was Fulham’s only victory on the road and a ghastly run of one win in 18 Premier League matches saw Chris Coleman sacked in mid-April after a 3-1 home loss to Manchester City. Lawrie Sanchez replaced him, dovetailing his commitments with Northern Ireland and he managed to secure their Premier League status after a 1-0 victory over an under-strength Liverpool FC side in their final home match of the season. Sanchez was given a three-year permanent contract in the summer.

 

2007-2008

2007 was a shocking calendar year for Fulham. Just four league victories across the 12 months and a fortune squandered in the transfer market by Lawrie Sanchez saw them really struggling to avoid relegation. Fulham parted company with Sanchez after a 1-0 home defeat to Newcastle United in mid-December and in came Roy Hodgson for his first managerial appointment in England in nine years.

There wasn’t an instant bounce, despite Bullard returning from his knee injury and scoring in a win over Aston Villa. There were just two wins in Hodgson’s first 13 league matches and when Sunderland won 3-1 at Craven Cottage in early April, Fulham looked doomed. Then, they produced their version of ‘The Great Escape.’

They won four of their last six matches, including a dramatic comeback victory at Manchester City when Diomansy Kamara fired home an injury-time winner. On the final day, Danny Murphy’s header defeated Portsmouth at Fratton Park and ensured Fulham’s safety; ensuring victories for Reading and Birmingham City were made academic. It remains one of the greatest survival stories in Premier League history.

 

2008-2009

Fulham were one of the success stories of the season and qualified for the newly-titled UEFA Europa League by finishing in a stunning seventh-place in the table. Hodgson inspired an improvement of 18 points and 10 places on the previous campaign.

Despite club captain Brian McBride leaving in the summer, the arrivals of Mark Schwarzer and Bobby Zamora made the Cottagers a more exciting and secure side. There were fantastic home victories over Arsenal and Manchester United and their position could have been higher but for their Achilles heel to strike again. Hodgson’s side scored just 11 goals away from home and mustered only three victories from 19 away games.

 

2009-2010

The 2009-2010 season was all about Fulham’s incredible journey in the UEFA Europa League. They produced some outstanding performances on the continent to knock out the likes of Serie A heavyweights Juventus, reigning holders Shakhtar Donetsk and Bundesliga champions VfL Wolfsburg.

After defeating Hamburger SV in the semi-finals, Fulham reached Hamburg’s stadium for the final against Atletico Madrid. They matched the Spanish giants throughout the contest but were agonisingly beaten in extra-time by Diego Forlan as Atletico won 2-1.

It was another solid season in the Premier League with 11 victories on home soil including a 3-0 rout of Manchester United in mid-December. They finished in 12th place but lost manager Roy Hodgson in the summer. The newly-crowned LMA Manager of the Year would take the vacancy at Liverpool FC.

 

2010-2011

Hodgson’s replacement as Fulham manager was the former Blackburn Rovers and Manchester City boss, Mark Hughes. Despite drawing 16 games in the Premier League, it was a successful season for Hughes and Fulham as the club finished eighth, the second-highest position in their Premier League history. It was a good recovery as the Cottagers ended Boxing Day in the bottom three after a 3-1 home defeat to bottom club West Ham United.

Hughes resigned though shortly after the season concluded, citing differences in the club’s direction for his decision.

 

2011-2012

It was Martin Jol who was the new manager for the start of the 2011-2012 campaign and Fulham enjoyed a couple of huge victories, beating west London rivals Queens Park Rangers 6-0 in October and Wolverhampton Wanderers 5-0 in March.

Fulham also managed to record a league double over Liverpool FC and inflicted a 5-2 loss on Newcastle United in January. Jol’s side finished in the top 10 again, coming ninth and with a better points tally than the previous season. They were helped by 16 goals from the outstanding Clint Dempsey, who filled the void vacated by Zamora who moved to QPR in the January transfer window.

 

2012-2013

Fulham’s 12th successive Premier League campaign did see them finish 12th but it flattered to deceive what was a concerning campaign for the hierarchy at Craven Cottage. A 3-0 final day victory at Swansea helped Martin Jol’s side leap up three positions in the final standings. Conceding 60 goals was a real worry but Dimitar Berbatov was a successful signing. The Bulgarian scored 15 times in his first season with the west Londoners after joining from Manchester United.

 

2013-2014

With the worst defensive record in the division, it was no surprise to see Fulham relegated on the penultimate weekend of the season. They shipped 85 goals, won just nine games and went through three managers as their 13-year stay in England’s top-flight ended rather meekly.

Martin Jol started the campaign but looked a man under pressure from an early stage and a 3-0 loss to West Ham at the end of November saw him pay the price with his job. Former Manchester United coach, Rene Meulensteen was given the job but he was dismissed in mid-February. He managed just three wins in 13 games, presiding over their worst-ever Premier League defeat too, being beaten 6-0 by Hull City in December.

Former VfL Wolfsburg and Bayern Munich manager Felix Magath came in far too late to save the sinking ship and a 4-1 defeat to Stoke condemned them to relegation in a season of nightmarish dreams for the supporters.

 

2018-2019

After beating Aston Villa in the Championship play-off final at Wembley Stadium, Fulham returned to the Premier League for the start of the 2018-2019 season. Over £100 million was spent in the summer transfer window, with the likes of Alfie Mawson, Andre Schurrle and Jean-Michel Serri among the new recruits.

They started with back-to-back defeats before overcoming Burnley 4-2. Serri’s first strike saw him win the first Goal of the Month vote from Match of the Day viewers for the season. A 2-2 draw away at Brighton ensured Fulham’s first away point of the season. It is early days but the Cottagers look set for an exciting campaign back in the top-flight.

The Clubs: Huddersfield Town

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
38 9 10 19 28 58 -30 37 1

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Mathias ‘Zanka’ Jorgensen 38
Jonas Lossl 38
Christopher Schindler 37
Aaron Mooy 36
Laurent Depoitre 33
Tom Ince 33
Rajiv van La Parra 33
Jonathan Hogg 30
Steve Mounie 28
Collin Quaner 26

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Steve Mounie 7
Laurent Depoitre 6
Aaron Mooy 4
Rajiv van La Parra 3
Tom Ince 2
Elias Kachunga 1
Joe Lolley 1
Alex Pritchard 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Watford 1-4 Huddersfield Town 16th December 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 4-1 AFC Bournemouth 11th February 2018 2017-2018
Crystal Palace 0-3 Huddersfield Town 12th August 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 2-0 Brighton & Hove Albion 9th December 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 2-1 Manchester United 21st October 2017 2017-2018

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 5-0 Huddersfield Town 29th November 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 0-4 Tottenham Hotspur 30th September 2017 2017-2018
AFC Bournemouth 4-0 Huddersfield Town 18th November 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-4 West Ham United 13th January 2018 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 3-0 Huddersfield Town 28th October 2017 2017-2018

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
David Wagner 3  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Huddersfield Town 2-1 Manchester United 21st October 2017 24,426 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-3 Chelsea 12th December 2017 24,169 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-0 West Bromwich Albion 4th November 2017 24,169 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 0-4 Tottenham Hotspur 30th September 2017 24,169 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-1 Leicester City 16th September 2017 24,169 2017-2018

 

Intro

Huddersfield Town’s promotion to the Premier League was unexpected and it was a fairytale season for everyone connected with the club. The Terriers made a brilliant start, recording an unbelievable victory over Manchester United along the way and completed a great season by surviving in the top-flight.

Written off by many experts and neutrals before the season, David Wagner and his team proved a lot of people wrong. Huddersfield’s ability to stay in matches and produce unexpected victories gave them a fighting chance to avoid relegation and a 1-1 draw at Stamford Bridge confirmed their place among the elite for 2018-2019. It was a memorable moment in a season no-one connected with the club will ever forget.

 

2017-2018

Many expected Huddersfield to experience an immediate relegation after their play-off final success on penalties against Reading three months earlier. However, they made a brilliant start to the campaign and remained unbeaten at the end of August. One of many summer arrivals, Steve Mounie helped himself to a debut double at Selhurst Park as the Terriers won 3-0 away at Crystal Palace on the opening weekend.

A week later, Aaron Mooy’s terrific long-range effort defeated Newcastle United in Huddersfield’s first Premier League match on home soil and a goalless draw with Southampton kept them flying high at the end of August.

Having been ridiculed and dropped by Mainz after an underwhelming campaign in the Bundesliga, Jonas Lossl had a point to prove and the Dane became one of Huddersfield’s key figures throughout the season. Lossl became the final goalkeeper to be beaten in the season, when a deflected effort from Pedro Obiang of West Ham United ended his undefeated streak of 339 minutes without conceding. The 2-0 defeat at The London Stadium was Huddersfield’s first at Premier League level.

October brought about the club’s highest point of the season. Mooy put in an electrifying performance at the heart of the midfield and scored the opening goal at home to Manchester United. Laurent Depoitre added a second shortly afterwards and despite Marcus Rashford pulling a goal back in the second half, Huddersfield held on for a famous 2-1 victory in one of the shock results of the entire season.

Impressive 4-1 victories over Watford and AFC Bournemouth showed Huddersfield could turn on the style when everything clicked and Tom Ince’s dramatic late winner at home to the Hornets in mid-April seemed to have them on the cusp of safety. However, a 2-0 home defeat to Everton a fortnight later meant Huddersfield realistically needed points from their final three matches to survive. Trouble was they were against Manchester City, Chelsea and Arsenal. Their survival chances looked bleak.

However, Wagner’s side continued to defy the critics. A battling defensive performance saw them earn an excellent point away at champions Manchester City. After Swansea’s home defeat to Southampton 24 hours earlier, just one point was needed in the club’s final two matches of the season. They achieved it at Stamford Bridge. Depoitre’s early goal in the second half and a breathtaking save by Lossl from international compatriot Andreas Christensen preserved Huddersfield’s point. They drew 1-1 and that meant safety was ensured.

Huddersfield supporters can look forward to a second campaign in the top-flight and will hope to create more amazing headlines in the 2018-2019 season.

The Clubs: Brighton & Hove Albion

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
38 9 13 16 34 54 -20 40 1

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Lewis Dunk 38
Pascal Gross 38
Mathew Ryan 38
Shane Duffy 37
Solly March 36
Dale Stephens 36
Glenn Murray 35
Davy Propper 35
Anthony Knockaert 33
Jose Izquierdo 32

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Glenn Murray 12
Pascal Gross 7
Jose Izquierdo 5
Anthony Knockaert 3
Tomer Hemed 2
Lewis Dunk 1
Jurgen Locadia 1
Solly March 1
Leonardo Ulloa 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Brighton & Hove Albion 4-1 Swansea City 24th February 2018 2017-2018
West Ham United 0-3 Brighton & Hove Albion 20th October 2017 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 3-1 West Bromwich Albion 9th September 2017 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 3-1 West Ham United 3rd February 2018 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 2-1 Arsenal 4th March 2018 2017-2018

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Brighton & Hove Albion 1-5 Liverpool FC 2nd December 2017 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-4 Chelsea 20th January 2018 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 4-0 Brighton & Hove Albion 13th May 2018 2017-2018
Manchester City 3-1 Brighton & Hove Albion 9th May 2018 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-2 Manchester City 12th August 2017 2017-2018

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Chris Hughton 4  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Brighton & Hove Albion 1-5 Liverpool FC 2nd December 2017 30,631 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-2 Leicester City 31st March 2018 30,629 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 2-1 Arsenal 4th March 2018 30,620 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 1-0 Manchester United 4th May 2018 30,611 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-4 Chelsea 20th January 2018 30,600 2017-2018

 

Intro

Brighton & Hove Albion made a successful debut in the Premier League. Chris Hughton’s side secured their survival on the penultimate weekend of the season but in truth, they were relatively comfortable all campaign. The Seagulls produced some fine performances on home soil and aided by the goals of Glenn Murray and creativity from Pascal Gross, they can look forward to a second successive season in the top-flight.

 

2017-2018

Having been promoted to the Premier League as Championship runners-up, Brighton & Hove Albion couldn’t have asked for a tougher start as title favourites Manchester City were their opening opponents. Chris Hughton’s side performed admirably but eventually lost 2-0 at home to the would-be champions at The Amex Stadium. August saw just one point gained and no goals scored.

However, Brighton started going in the right direction in September. Summer signing Pascal Gross scored the club’s first Premier League goal in their 3-1 victory at home to West Bromwich Albion which was also Brighton’s first victory in their Premier League life. Forward Tomer Hemed also scored in the win over the Baggies and a fortnight later, it was Hemed’s diving header that ensured back-to-back home victories as Newcastle United were defeated 1-0.

Home form was excellent all season for the men from the south coast. Just Manchester City, Liverpool FC, Chelsea and Leicester City left with all three points and there were some notable scalps along the way. Lewis Dunk’s only goal of the season started Hughton’s side on their way to a famous 2-1 victory over struggling Arsenal in March; Brighton’s first victory over the Gunners since 1982. Gross, who was voted the club’s Player of the Season, then made major contributions in two other impressive results. His spot-kick earned a hard-fought 1-1 draw with Tottenham Hotspur in April and a month later, it was the ex-Ingolstadt player who produced the winning goal against Manchester United that ultimately secured Brighton’s safety.

Hughton’s deals in the transfer market were impressive too. Gross had been signed for a bargain amount and other astute deals included the signings of Davy Propper from PSV Eindhoven, Jose Izquierdo from Club Brugge and the January arrival of Jurgen Locadia, also from PSV. The highlight away from home was a stunning 3-0 triumph at The London Stadium over West Ham United in October. Glenn Murray scored twice and he was the top goalscorer with 12 goals in an excellent campaign for him personally.

Brighton finished the season in 15th place and have already started to put the foundations in-place for a second campaign in the Premier League.

The Clubs: Queens Park Rangers

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
278 81 65 132 339 431 -92 308 7

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Andy Impey 142
Simon Barker 132
David Bardsley 131
Clive Wilson 118
Alan McDonald 116
Les Ferdinand 110
Ian Holloway 107
Trevor Sinclair 101
Ray Wilkins 84
Steve Yates 82

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Les Ferdinand 60
Bradley Allen 20
Charlie Austin 18
Kevin Gallen 18
Gary Penrice 17
Simon Barker 15
Danny Dichio 13
Andy Impey 11
Trevor Sinclair 10
Djibril Cisse 9

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Queens Park Rangers 5-1 Coventry City 23rd October 1993 1993-1994
West Ham United 0-4 Queens Park Rangers 28th August 1993 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 4-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd October 1992 1992-1993
West Bromwich Albion 1-4 Queens Park Rangers 4th April 2015 2014-2015
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 Ipswich Town 2nd October 1993 1993-1994
Everton 0-3 Queens Park Rangers 20th November 1993 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 Newcastle United 4th February 1995 1994-1995
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 Southampton 30th March 1996 1995-1996
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 West Ham United 27th April 1996 1995-1996
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-3 Queens Park Rangers 17th September 2011 2011-2012

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Fulham 6-0 Queens Park Rangers 2nd October 2011 2011-2012
Manchester City 6-0 Queens Park Rangers 10th May 2015 2014-2015
Chelsea 6-1 Queens Park Rangers 29th April 2012 2011-2012
Queens Park Rangers 0-5 Swansea City 18th August 2012 2012-2013
Leicester City 5-1 Queens Park Rangers 24th May 2015 2014-2015
Queens Park Rangers 0-4 Leeds United 4th April 1994 1993-1994
Blackburn Rovers 4-0 Queens Park Rangers 26th November 1994 1994-1995
Leeds United 4-0 Queens Park Rangers 24th January 1995 1994-1995
Queens Park Rangers 0-4 Bolton Wanderers 13th August 2011 2011-2012
Tottenham Hotspur 4-0 Queens Park Rangers 24th August 2014 2014-2015

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Gerry Francis 3 11th November 1994
Ray Wilkins 3 4th September 1996
Neil Warnock 3 8th January 2012
Mark Hughes 2 23rd November 2012
Harry Redknapp 3 3rd February 2015
Chris Ramsey 2 4th November 2015

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Queens Park Rangers 2-3 Manchester United 5th February 1994 21,267 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 1-3 Manchester United 18th January 1993 21,117 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 0-1 Liverpool FC 23rd November 1992 21,056 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 0-0 Arsenal 2nd September 1992 20,868 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 4-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd October 1992 19,845 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 1-3 Liverpool FC 18th August 1993 19,635 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 2-1 Leeds United 24th October 1992 19,326 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 2-3 Manchester United 10th December 1994 18,948 1994-1995
Queens Park Rangers 2-1 Aston Villa 8th May 1993 18,904 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 West Ham United 27th April 1996 18,828 1995-1996

 

Intro

Queens Park Rangers have experienced an up-and-down adventure in the Premier League. They were the best team in the capital in the 1992-1993 Premier League season but were relegated just three seasons later. Neil Warnock ended their 15-year hiatus in 2011 but QPR have since gone down on two more occasions, attempting to spend big and not getting the balance of their squad right. Former Premier League manager Steve McClaren has recently replaced Ian Holloway and will try to get the club away from the mid-table reaches of the Championship on a regular basis.

 

1992-1993

Queens Park Rangers finished as London’s top team in the first Premier League season, ending in an excellent fifth position. Les Ferdinand achieved back-to-back hat-tricks during the Easter programme and finished runner-up to Teddy Sheringham in the race for the Golden Boot. It wasn’t quite enough to achieve European football for the following season but it showed how far Gerry Francis’ side had come.

 

1993-1994

Although there was a drop from fifth to ninth place, Queens Park Rangers were once again an entertaining side to watch in 1993-1994. Francis’ excellent reign saw him linked to the England job when Graham Taylor resigned and he then turned down the chance to manage an ambitious Wolverhampton Wanderers in Division One in March 1994. The sale of Darren Peacock to Newcastle United frustrated the manager but Les Ferdinand sparkled again with 16 goals.

 

1994-1995

Queens Park Rangers underperformed badly in the 1994-1995 early weeks and a nine-game winless sequence early on saw them struggling in 20th after a 4-2 loss to Norwich City in October 1994. Their season kick-started at the end of October with back-to-back home victories over Aston Villa and Liverpool FC but the corner would be turned without Gerry Francis. He resigned in early November after feeling trust had broken down between himself and the board over the planned appointment of club icon Rodney Marsh as a Director of Football.

Francis was replaced by former player Ray Wilkins, who was released by Crystal Palace to take his first job in management. He guided QPR to a fine eighth-place finish and the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. Les Ferdinand was top scorer again but would leave in the off-season to join Newcastle United.

 

1995-1996

The decision not to reinvest the Ferdinand money was a bad decision, even though both Kevin Gallen and Danny Dichio did well in a struggling side. Three wins in the first eight matches did have QPR in 12th place at the end of September but that was the highest the Hoops would get all season in the table.

A dire run of seven successive defeats from Boxing Day to 11th February would give Wilkins’ side too much to do. Despite a 3-0 victory in their final home match of the season against London rivals West Ham United, Queens Park Rangers were relegated in 19th place – ending their 13-year stay in England’s top-flight.

 

2011-2012

After an absence of 15 years, Queens Park Rangers returned to the top-flight in-time for the 2011-2012 season with Neil Warnock as the club’s manager. He invested in experience in the summer, with the likes of Joey Barton, Anton Ferdinand, Shaun Wright-Phillips and Kieron Dyer among the new recruits.

QPR actually made a decent start and when they won 3-2 away at Stoke City in mid-November, they moved into ninth place. However, that would be Warnock’s final win as manager. Two points from the next eight matches saw them drop into relegation danger and Warnock lost his job as a result. He was replaced by Mark Hughes.

Loftus Road became a tough place for stronger sides to visit. The likes of Liverpool FC, Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur were all beaten there in the run-in and it was this fortress that ensured QPR escaped relegation on the final day of the season by just a single point.

 

2012-2013

It took Queens Park Rangers a full 17 matches before they even tasted victory in a wretched 2012-2013 campaign. When it came in a 2-1 success over London rivals Fulham, the die looked like it had already been cast. Mark Hughes was sacked in mid-November and an ageing squad just didn’t perform even for Harry Redknapp. It was a team with plenty of individuals but they didn’t seem to gel as a team.

Redknapp did make QPR tougher to beat when he arrived but just three further victories were achieved against Southampton, Sunderland and most surprisingly, away at Chelsea in January 2013. Shaun Wright-Phillips’ winning goal at Stamford Bridge was the only bright spark in a wretched season. Relegation was officially confirmed by a forgettable 0-0 draw at Reading in April, who also went down on the same afternoon.

 

2014-2015

After a late winner from Bobby Zamora in the Championship play-off final against Derby County, QPR returned to the top-flight and Redknapp was still at the helm. He spent £32 million in the summer in a bid to try and avoid the problems of the last Premier League campaign.

He did have a proven goalscorer in Charlie Austin. Austin scored 18 Premier League goals and netted a hat-trick in a thrilling 3-2 comeback victory over West Bromwich Albion in December. It was part of a home sequence that saw QPR amass 13 points from five games, including a 2-2 draw with defending champions Manchester City, where Austin again starred with two goals.

Away form was less impressive though. They collected just seven points on their travels and none under Redknapp’s time at the club. He stepped down in early February, citing a knee operation as the cause for his abrupt departure. Chris Ramsey took caretaker charge but QPR were fighting a losing battle and their fate was sealed by a 6-0 loss at Manchester City in May.

The Clubs: Blackpool

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
38 10 9 19 55 78 -23 39 1

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Ian Evatt 38
Charlie Adam 35
David Vaughan 35
DJ Campbell 31
Stephen Crainey 31
Neal Eardley 31
Gary Taylor-Fletcher 31
Craig Cathcart 30
Luke Varney 30
Matt Phillips 27

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
DJ Campbell 13
Charlie Adam 12
Marlon Harewood 5
Gary Taylor-Fletcher 5
Luke Varney 5
Jason Puncheon 3
Alex Baptiste 2
Matt Phillips 2
David Vaughan 2
Craig Cathcart 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Wigan Athletic 0-4 Blackpool 14th August 2010 2010-2011
Blackpool 3-1 Tottenham Hotspur 22nd February 2011 2010-2011
Newcastle United 0-2 Blackpool 11th September 2010 2010-2011
Sunderland 0-2 Blackpool 28th December 2010 2010-2011
Blackpool 4-3 Bolton Wanderers 14th May 2011 2010-2011

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 6-0 Blackpool 21st August 2010 2010-2011
Chelsea 4-0 Blackpool 19th September 2010 2010-2011
Wolverhampton Wanderers 4-0 Blackpool 26th February 2011 2010-2011
Fulham 3-0 Blackpool 3rd April 2011 2010-2011
Everton 5-3 Blackpool 5th February 2011 2010-2011

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Ian Holloway 4 3rd November 2012

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Blackpool 2-3 Manchester City 17th October 2010 16,116 2010-2011
Blackpool 2-2 Everton 6th November 2010 16,094 2010-2011
Blackpool 2-1 Liverpool FC 12th January 2011 16,089 2010-2011
Blackpool 3-1 Tottenham Hotspur 22nd February 2011 16,069 2010-2011
Blackpool 1-2 Sunderland 22nd January 2011 16,037 2010-2011

 

Intro

Blackpool might have only been part of the Premier League party for a single season but they were a neutral’s favourite. Their all-out attack policy won many fans and saw the Tangerines involved in some of the best matches of the 2010-2011 Premier League season. Ian Holloway’s side were box-office material, enjoying a league double over Liverpool FC along the way. Sadly, form and confidence caught up with the Seasiders in the second half of the season and a 4-2 loss on the final day to Manchester United saw them relegated exactly a year to the day when they were promoted.

 

2010-2011

Blackpool began the 2010-2011 season as bookies favourites to be relegated after their surprising promotion via the play-offs. However, Ian Holloway and his side didn’t read the script on day one. They tore Wigan Athletic apart in a game moved to Wigan’s home ground whilst development work was being completed on Bloomfield Road to meet Premier League standards. Blackpool won 4-0, with debutant Marlon Harewood scoring twice.

There were sensational away victories at Newcastle United, Stoke City and Sunderland as Blackpool fast became away day specialists. In October 2011, they gave Liverpool FC one of their darkest results in their Premier League history, beating the Reds 2-1 at Anfield. DJ Campbell was top scorer with 13 goals, backed up by some heroic performances from Charlie Adam.

Blackpool sat eighth at the turn of the year and completed a league double over Liverpool FC in the early weeks of January 2011. A 3-2 loss to West Bromwich Albion days later though started a dramatic turn in their fortunes. Holloway’s men lost seven of their next nine matches and began to fall down towards the relegation places. When Wigan gained revenge for their opening day defeat in mid-April with a 3-1 away win at Bloomfield Road, Blackpool had dropped into the bottom three for the first time in the season.

A four-game unbeaten run followed and a belting 4-3 victory over Bolton Wanderers in their final home match left Blackpool outside the bottom three going into the final day. A positive result at Old Trafford on the final day and they could still achieve survival. Adam and Gary Taylor-Fletcher scored to have the visitors leading 2-1 early in the second half but defensive frailties caught up with them. They lost 4-2 and that condemned them to relegation regardless of other results. Despite scoring as many goals as fifth-placed Tottenham Hotspur, Blackpool’s leaky defence would cost them. They shipped 78 goals and that meant they were heading back to the Championship.

It was short-lived but a season their supporters will never forget.

The Clubs: Wimbledon

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
316 99 94 123 384 472 -88 391 8

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Robbie Earle 243
Marcus Gayle 204
Kenny Cunningham 201
Alan Kimble 181
Neil Sullivan 179
Vinnie Jones 177
Dean Holdsworth 169
Neal Ardley 168
Chris Perry 167
Dean Blackwell 157

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Dean Holdsworth 58
Robbie Earle 45
Efan Ekoku 38
Marcus Gayle 34
Jason Euell 21
John Fashanu 17
Carl Cort 16
Oyvind Leonhardsen 13
Neal Ardley 12
Vinnie Jones 12

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Wimbledon 5-0 Watford 4th December 1999 1999-2000
Wimbledon 4-0 Crystal Palace 9th April 1993 1992-1993
Wimbledon 4-0 Everton 7th September 1996 1996-1997
Wimbledon 5-2 Oldham Athletic 12th December 1992 1992-1993
Wimbledon 4-1 Blackburn Rovers 29th March 1994 1993-1994
Wimbledon 4-1 Barnsley 23rd September 1997 1997-1998
Wimbledon 3-0 Norwich City 20th March 1993 1992-1993
Wimbledon 3-0 Swindon Town 6th November 1993 1993-1994
Wimbledon 3-0 Oldham Athletic 26th April 1994 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 0-3 Wimbledon 23rd August 1995 1995-1996

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Aston Villa 7-1 Wimbledon 11th February 1995 1994-1995
Newcastle United 6-1 Wimbledon 21st October 1995 1995-1996
Aston Villa 5-0 Wimbledon 22nd December 1996 1996-1997
Arsenal 5-0 Wimbledon 18th April 1998 1997-1998
Oldham Athletic 6-2 Wimbledon 3rd April 1993 1992-1993
Wimbledon 2-6 Tottenham Hotspur 2nd May 1998 1997-1998
Manchester United 5-1 Wimbledon 17th October 1998 1998-1999
Arsenal 5-1 Wimbledon 19th April 1999 1998-1999
Sheffield Wednesday 5-1 Wimbledon 2nd October 1999 1999-2000
Leeds United 4-0 Wimbledon 2nd October 1993 1993-1994

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Joe Kinnear 7 9th June 1999
Egil Olsen 1 1st May 2000
Terry Burton 1 25th April 2002

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Wimbledon 1-2 Manchester United 8th May 1993 30,115 1992-1993
Wimbledon 1-0 Manchester United 16th April 1994 28,553 1993-1994
Wimbledon 2-5 Manchester United 22nd November 1997 26,309 1997-1998
Wimbledon 2-2 Manchester United 26th February 2000 26,129 1999-2000
Wimbledon 1-1 Manchester United 3rd April 1999 26,121 1998-1999
Wimbledon 1-1 Liverpool FC 9th August 1997 26,106 1997-1998
Wimbledon 1-2 Liverpool FC 16th April 2000 26,102 1999-2000
Wimbledon 1-0 Liverpool FC 13th December 1998 26,080 1998-1999
Wimbledon 1-0 Arsenal 21st November 1998 26,003 1998-1999
Wimbledon 1-3 Arsenal 1st April 2000 25,858 1999-2000

 

Intro

Often defying the odds in the 1990s, going to Selhurst Park to play the tenants of Wimbledon was often a fearful thought. “The Crazy Gang” had the ability to completely upset an opponent’s gameplan with their intimidating approach to the game. It might not have been everyone’s cup of tea but Wimbledon did make the critics eat their words on many occasions. They finished sixth in 1993-1994 and eighth in 1996-1997. Relegation did follow in 2000 and Wimbledon eventually made a controversial move to Milton Keynes in 2002, reforming as Milton Keynes Dons two years later.

 

1992-1993

Tipped as relegation favourites by many football experts at the start of the inaugural Premier League season, it looked like they might be right when Wimbledon spent Boxing Day in the drop zone. That was despite a shock 1-0 victory away at Old Trafford in October thanks to a Lawrie Sanchez goal.

However, the south Londoners rallied in the second half of the season, doing the league double over Liverpool FC and thrashing their landlords Crystal Palace 4-0 in April. Wimbledon finished 12th in the table and only Les Ferdinand and Teddy Sheringham scored more goals than Dean Holdsworth in the division. He netted 19 times.

 

1993-1994

Unlike the previous campaign, Wimbledon started the 1993-1994 season in good form, losing just one of their first nine matches. A run of one win in nine games followed which saw them drop into the mid-table positions by Christmas but Wimbledon rallied fantastically in 1994 and were the form side in the division by the end of the campaign.

Holdsworth struck 24 goals in all competitions and the Dons won seven of their final 10 matches to finish sixth in the standings – equalling their highest top-flight finish set back in 1987. Out of the London clubs, only Arsenal finished higher and there were notable home successes against runners-up Blackburn Rovers and champions Manchester United.

 

1994-1995

In the summer of 1994, Joe Kinnear elected to sell a Wimbledon stalwart in the form of John Fashanu. He departed to join Aston Villa for £1.35 million. His replacement was Efan Ekoku, who arrived from Norwich City two months into the campaign. Ekoku finished as the club’s top goalscorer with nine goals as Wimbledon finished ninth in the table after a steady season.

Among the highlights were a four-game winning sequence in March and a 3-2 victory in November over Newcastle United which knocked the Geordies off top spot. They did suffer their worst-ever Premier League loss though, going down 7-1 at Aston Villa in February.

 

1995-1996

In the close season, Wimbledon sold Warren Barton to Newcastle United for a British transfer record fee for a defender but started the campaign very well, with just one defeat from their first five games which came at Old Trafford. However, after a 1-0 success over Liverpool FC, the Dons didn’t win another Premier League game until a Boxing Day triumph in a London Derby at Chelsea.

Wimbledon’s defence was their Achilles heel throughout the season. Only relegated Bolton Wanderers conceded more goals (71) than Kinnear’s side did (70) and he didn’t seem to settle on a regular goalkeeper throughout the season with Paul Heald, Hans Segers and Neil Sullivan all having spells in-goal. They finished 14th but only three points clear of trouble in a campaign that didn’t fulfil pre-season expectations.

 

1996-1997

Wimbledon were involved in one of the Premier League’s most iconic goals on the opening day of the season as David Beckham managed to score from inside his own half in stoppage-time of Manchester United’s opening day 3-0 victory. Further defeats in away games at Newcastle United and Leeds United followed. It seemed like tough days were ahead for the Dons.

Then, they defied the critics again, going on a 19-match unbeaten run, which included seven Premier League victories in a row. After Dean Holdsworth’s late header beat Blackburn Rovers 1-0 in mid-December, Wimbledon sat in third position in the table and just a single point behind league leaders Arsenal.

However, they were hammered 5-0 in their very next match by Aston Villa and just five further wins followed. Despite making the semi-finals of both domestic cup competitions, Wimbledon missed out on European football, finishing in eighth position. However, it was still considered a remarkable season given the small fanbase and lack of resources that were available to manager Joe Kinnear.

 

1997-1998

“The Crazy Gang” spirit was once more fully shown throughout the 1997-1998 season which was a tougher campaign after the club’s all-time leading Premier League goalscorer, Dean Holdsworth was transferred to newly-promoted Bolton Wanderers in October. Another icon to depart before the season’s end was Vinnie Jones who was sold to Queens Park Rangers in March 1998 for £750,000.

Wimbledon did reach ninth place in the table when Marcus Gayle’s header beat Leicester City 1-0 at Filbert Street but once again, form dropped alarmingly in the second half of the season. Although never in any real danger of being relegated, Wimbledon ended in 15th place which was their worst-ever top-flight finish at this point.

 

1998-1999

With 11 matches left in the 1998-1999 season, Wimbledon were right in the race to qualify for the UEFA Cup. Among their victims at Selhurst Park in the season were Arsenal and Liverpool FC, whilst champions-elect Manchester United were held to a 1-1 draw. They were sixth in the table ahead of a trip to Hillsborough to play Sheffield Wednesday in March.

Manager Joe Kinnear was taken to hospital after suffering a heart attack. He would be sidelined for the remainder of the season and without their leader, Wimbledon seemed to lose all direction. In their last 11 games, they claimed just two points and dropped to 16th in the final standings, their lowest finish since entering the top-flight in 1986.

The club did break their transfer record in January to sign John Hartson for £7.5 million from London rivals, West Ham United.

 

1999-2000

On health grounds, Joe Kinnear stepped down in the summer after seven years as the Wimbledon gaffer and he was replaced by Norwegian Egil Olsen, whose style of football was fairly similar to Kinnear’s preferences.

For much of the season, Wimbledon seemed fairly comfortable in the lower reaches of mid-table but a run of eight straight defeats in March and April saw them dragged into the relegation dogfight. Owner Sam Hamann left in February and star striker Hartson fell out with the manager after a planned move to Tottenham Hotspur collapsed.

After a 3-0 defeat away to relegation rivals Bradford City at the end of April, Olsen paid for strained relations with most of his playing squad and lost his job. Kinnear’s former no.2, Terry Burton stepped into the breach and a 2-2 draw at home to Aston Villa ensured they went into the final day in control of their own destiny.

However, Bradford’s shock final day victory over Liverpool FC, combined with the Dons 2-0 defeat to Southampton ended their 14-year stay in the top-flight. Their relegation was confirmed 12 years to the day of their biggest triumph which was victory in the 1988 FA Cup final.

The Clubs: West Ham United

All data correct upto 23rd April 2018

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
840 273 220 347 1006 1209 -203 1039 22

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Mark Noble 314
Carlton Cole 216
Steve Potts 204
James Collins 187
Robert Green 177
Trevor Sinclair 177
John Moncur 175
Ludek Miklosko 169
Winston Reid 166
James Tomkins 164

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Paolo Di Canio 48
Carlton Cole 41
Mark Noble 36
Trevor Sinclair 36
Andy Carroll 33
Freddie Kanoute 29
John Hartson 24
Frank Lampard 24
Tony Cottee 23
Julian Dicks 21

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
West Ham United 6-0 Barnsley 10th January 1998 1997-1998
West Ham United 5-0 Coventry City 22nd April 2000 1999-2000
West Ham United 5-0 Charlton Athletic 26th December 2000 2000-2001
Derby County 0-5 West Ham United 10th November 2007 2007-2008
West Ham United 5-1 Sheffield Wednesday 3rd May 1997 1996-1997
West Ham United 5-1 Derby County 17th April 1999 1998-1999
West Ham United 4-0 Middlesbrough 16th May 1999 1998-1999
West Ham United 4-0 Derby County 26th December 2001 2001-2002
West Ham United 4-0 Aston Villa 12th September 2005 2005-2006
Tottenham Hotspur 1-4 West Ham United 4th April 1994 1993-1994

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 7-1 West Ham United 1st April 2000 1999-2000
Blackburn Rovers 7-1 West Ham United 14th October 2001 2001-2002
Everton 6-0 West Ham United 8th May 1999 1998-1999
Reading 6-0 West Ham United 1st January 2007 2006-2007
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 West Ham United 18th December 1993 1993-1994
Liverpool FC 5-0 West Ham United 2nd May 1998 1997-1998
Everton 5-0 West Ham United 29th September 2001 2001-2002
Newcastle United 5-0 West Ham United 5th January 2011 2010-2011
West Ham United 1-5 Leeds United 1st May 1999 1998-1999
Chelsea 5-1 West Ham United 20th January 2002 2001-2002

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Billy Bonds 1 10th August 1994
Harry Redknapp 7 9th May 2001
Glenn Roeder 2 24th August 2003
Alan Pardew 2 11th December 2006
Alan Curbishley 3 3rd September 2008
Gianfranco Zola 2 11th May 2010
Avram Grant 1 15th May 2011
Sam Allardyce 3 24th May 2015
Slaven Bilic 3 6th November 2017
David Moyes 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
West Ham United 0-2 Manchester United 2nd January 2017 56,996 2016-2017
West Ham United 1-0 Tottenham Hotspur 5th May 2017 56,992 2016-2017
West Ham United 1-0 Burnley 14th December 2016 56,990 2016-2017
West Ham United 2-3 Tottenham Hotspur 23rd September 2017 56,988 2017-2018
West Ham United 1-0 Sunderland 22nd October 2016 56,985 2016-2017
West Ham United 0-4 Liverpool FC 14th May 2017 56,985 2016-2017
West Ham United 3-0 Crystal Palace 14th January 2017 56,984 2016-2017
West Ham United 1-2 Chelsea 6th March 2017 56,984 2016-2017
West Ham United 2-2 West Bromwich Albion 11th February 2017 56,983 2016-2017
West Ham United 0-4 Manchester City 1st February 2017 56,980 2016-2017

 

Intro

This is West Ham United’s 22nd Premier League season and the Hammers have often been in the headlines. They finished in fifth place in 1999 under the wise guidance of Harry Redknapp and narrowly missed out on a top six finish in 2016. They left behind Upton Park to move into The London Stadium in time for the 2016-2017 season but it has been a tricky time since the change in stadium. David Moyes is the current manager and looks to have guided them to another season of Premier League football for 2018-2019.

 

1993-1994

It was Billy Bonds who guided West Ham United into the Premier League and they finished a creditable 13th in the table, without ever looking like being dragged into a relegation battle. It was veteran Clive Allen who scored both goals in their first Premier League victory over Sheffield Wednesday but Trevor Morley led the goalscoring charts with 13 goals. Highlights included a 2-0 victory away at Blackburn Rovers in September and 4-1 thrashing of Tottenham Hotspur in April.

 

1994-1995

There was a change in management just days before the season started. Fearing that their assistant manager Harry Redknapp was about to return to AFC Bournemouth as manager, the directors promoted him to the manager’s post at Upton Park. Billy Bonds resigned acrimoniously and Redknapp immediately had a point to prove to the supporters.

Re-signing the likes of Tony Cottee and Julian Dicks helped but the Londoners spent a good portion of the season in the bottom four. Just one defeat in their last 11 games though steered them to safety and a 14th place finish which including impressive home wins over Blackburn Rovers and Liverpool FC.

 

1995-1996

West Ham achieved their first top-half finish since promotion to the Premier League. A 10th place result saw a best finish for the club in the top-flight since coming third in 1986. Left-back Julian Dicks was joint-top scorer with 10 goals alongside the experienced Tony Cottee and the season also saw Premier League debuts for future title winners, Rio Ferdinand and Frank Lampard.

 

1996-1997

There was plenty of excitement in pre-season about the arrival of Romanian forward Florin Raducioiu. However, he scored just twice and walked out on the club mid-season. It was a season of struggle and in early February, West Ham looked in genuine danger of being relegated. Redknapp then went into the transfer market and the double striker arrival of Paul Kitson and John Hartson took them clear of trouble. West Ham finished 14th with Kitson scoring an impressive eight times to finish top scorer despite not being with the club for over half the campaign.

 

1997-1998

A quantum leap forward was made in the 1997-1998 season as West Ham wound up in an excellent 8th place. John Hartson was the top goalscorer with 15 goals and young defender Rio Ferdinand won his first international call-up as his rise through the ranks continued. A 6-0 victory over Barnsley in January 1998 remains their biggest-ever Premier League victory.

 

1998-1999

There was another busy summer at Upton Park with the likes of Shaka Hislop, Neil Ruddock and Arsenal goalscoring great Ian Wright all arriving at the club. West Ham made a brilliant start to the season and a 2-1 victory over Tottenham Hotspur at the end of November took them into the dizzying heights of second position in the table.

Whilst the likes of Manchester United, Arsenal and Chelsea eventually overtook the Hammers, West Ham’s final finish of 5th place ensured UEFA Cup football and a return to European action for the first time in 19 years. This was despite selling John Hartson in January 1999 to Wimbledon for £7 million.

 

1999-2000

For the third successive season, West Ham United finished in the Premier League’s top 10 with a 9th place finish. Joe Cole and Michael Carrick were another two players from the famed academy to make the breakthrough into the first-team. Having arrived halfway through the previous season, Paolo Di Canio scored 16 times including winning Goal of the Season for a spectacular volley against Wimbledon in March.

West Ham were also involved in one of the games of the season, beating Bradford City 5-4 in February, despite trailing 1-0, 3-1 and 4-2 during the match. They did lose 7-1 to Manchester United in April which is their joint-biggest defeat in Premier League history.

 

2000-2001

This turned out to be Harry Redknapp’s final season as West Ham manager and one of his toughest. The sale of Rio Ferdinand in November 2000 to Leeds United for £18 million strained relations between the board and manager and Redknapp left just before the season ended. He fell out with owner Terry Brown over transfer funds for the forthcoming season. Youth coach Glenn Roeder would take over on a permanent basis in the off-season.

 

2001-2002

The Glenn Roeder reign got off to a dreadful start. West Ham won just one of their first seven matches and suffered back-to-back heavy thrashings at the hands of Everton and Blackburn Rovers in the autumn. So, he did brilliantly to steer the club away from trouble and they finished an impressive 7th in the final standings. Frank Lampard was sold in pre-season to Chelsea but Paolo Di Canio stayed despite nearly joining Manchester United in January and Freddie Kanoute was top scorer for the second successive season with 11 goals.

 

2002-2003

Despite having the likes of Joe Cole, Michael Carrick, Jermain Defoe, David James and Paolo Di Canio among their squad, West Ham United were relegated at the end of the season, despite achieving 42 points which normally guarantees Premier League safety. West Ham made a wretched start again, not winning until late September and spending Christmas Day bottom of the table.

They didn’t win at Upton Park until a 2-1 victory over Blackburn Rovers in January. Football didn’t matter in late April though when manager Glenn Roeder collapsed shortly after a victory against Middlesbrough. Roeder was diagnosed with a non-malignant brain tumour which was successfully operated on.

That meant club legend Trevor Brooking took charge of the final three games. He got them important wins over Manchester City and Chelsea and a final day draw with Birmingham City. However, the form of other sides at the wrong end of the table was just as impressive and that meant West Ham’s 10-year tenure in the top-flight ended.

 

2005-2006

After two years in the wilderness of the Championship, West Ham United returned to the Premier League in 2005-2006 with Alan Pardew as the manager. They made a good start and sat fourth at the end of September with 11 points from their first six matches. There were excellent victories away at Highbury against Arsenal in February and on the final day at home to Tottenham Hotspur. West Ham finished a very satisfying ninth in the table and reached the FA Cup final where they lost on penalties to Liverpool FC.

 

2006-2007

On transfer deadline day, West Ham shocked the football world with the signings of Argentine duo Carlos Tevez and Javier Mascherano. It would ensure for a dramatic season in the East End of London. Both players failed to sparkle and Mascherano would move on-loan to Liverpool FC in January. By this point, Alan Pardew had been sacked as the Hammers slipped into the bottom three. He was replaced by Alan Curbishley but form continued to elude the club.

They received a 6-0 mauling from Reading on New Years’ Day and when Tottenham Hotspur produced a dramatic fightback to snatch a 4-3 victory at Upton Park in March, West Ham were bottom and 10 points adrift of safety with just nine games to play. Relegation looked all but a formality. However, Tevez suddenly discovered his scoring touch, putting in some magical displays and West Ham won seven of their last nine matches to climb off the bottom and out of the relegation zone. On the final day, Tevez scored the winner at Old Trafford to ensure the club’s safety amidst high controversy.

The signings of Tevez and Mascherano breached Premier League rules regarding third-party ownership of players. West Ham pleaded guilty to the charges and rather than a points deduction, were given a hefty fine, much to the chagrin of relegation rivals Sheffield United, Fulham and Wigan Athletic.

 

2007-2008

Alan Curbishley’s first full season as West Ham manager was unremarkable to say the least. The club finished in 10th place, well clear of relegation danger but not strong enough to create a challenge for the European qualifying positions. Dean Ashton was top scorer with 10 goals after recovering from a broken ankle that had ruled him out of the whole of the previous campaign.

 

2008-2009

Despite winning two of their first three games, Alan Curbishley resigned as manager after stating not having full control over transfers. He was annoyed to see defenders Anton Ferdinand and George McCartney sold to Sunderland without his knowledge. He was replaced by Chelsea playing legend Gianfranco Zola. Despite winning just three of his first 14 Premier League matches, a 4-1 victory on Boxing Day over Portsmouth started an excellent sequence that took West Ham into the top half.

They finished in ninth spot, despite losing Craig Bellamy in the January transfer window to Manchester City and Dean Ashton to retirement.

 

2009-2010

An opening day victory away at Molineux hinted at another encouraging campaign but Zola found the going very tough and West Ham went winless until a late Zavon Hines goal defeated Aston Villa in early November. November was the club’s best month of the season, with seven points from four games.

There was a change in the boardroom in January with the former Birmingham City owners, David Gold and David Sullivan succeeding cash-strapped Icelandic owner Björgólfur Gudmundsson. They immediately identified Zola as the wrong man for the job and sacked him at the end of the season. West Ham finished a disappointing 17th, narrowly avoiding relegation after a 3-2 victory over Wigan Athletic in late April.

 

2010-2011

Avram Grant was appointed as Zola’s successor following Portsmouth’s relegation from the Premier League. It didn’t seem like an inspired choice and losing their first four matches put the Hammers on the backfoot for the entire campaign. Bottom on Christmas Day, there was a brief revival over the festive period with victories over Fulham and Wolverhampton Wanderers, along with a draw against Everton. However, West Ham won just three games in 2011 and after throwing away a two-goal lead to lose 3-2 to Wigan Athletic on the penultimate weekend, the club were relegated.

Grant was sacked pretty much straight after the game and replaced in the off-season by Sam Allardyce. The one crumb of comfort for supporters was the sensational form of Scott Parker. The midfielder won the Football Writers’ award, despite playing for a relegated side.

 

2012-2013

Sam Allardyce guided West Ham back into the Premier League at the first attempt via the play-offs. He strengthened the squad with the arrivals of experienced players like Jussi Jaaskelainen, Mohamed Diame and James Collins, who returned for a second spell after a stint at Aston Villa. Allardyce also managed to bring Andy Carroll into the club on-loan after he fell out of favour at Liverpool FC.

After winning four of their first eight matches, West Ham sat sixth in the table and never looked in any relegation danger. 14th was the lowest position they’d occupy all season which was after a defeat to Chelsea in March. In the end, a 10th place finish was a good season for all parties with skipper Kevin Nolan ending as top scorer. His 10 goals figure was helped by a final day hat-trick at home to Reading.

 

2013-2014

Sam Allardyce’s third season as West Ham United manager was his toughest as the Hammers struggled to find any consistency. The Hammers won just three games in the first half of the season, although one of those victories was a notable 3-0 away triumph at White Hart Lane over Tottenham Hotspur. After heavy cup defeats in early January to Nottingham Forest in the FA Cup and a League Cup loss to Manchester City, there was big pressure on Allardyce from supporters.

16 points out of a possible 21 followed which guided the club away from trouble and West Ham eventually finished 13th but apart from a league double over Tottenham, there weren’t many highlights for the fans to remember.

 

2014-2015

After the general struggle of 2013-2014, West Ham were flying high in the early part of the 2014-2015 season. Liverpool FC and Manchester City were among their victims at Upton Park and the club sat in fourth place going into Christmas. Unfortunately, only another three victories followed against Hull City, Sunderland and Burnley. West Ham slipped to 12th place by the end of the season which was slightly disappointing considering how high they were earlier in the campaign.

Moments after the season concluded with defeat on Tyneside to Newcastle United, the board confirmed Allardyce’s contract would not be renewed and he would leave to take a break from football management. Aaron Cresswell was voted Hammer of the Year after an impressive debut campaign.

 

2015-2016

Former player Slaven Bilic was chosen as the man to lead West Ham through their final season at Upton Park. They began with a marvellous hat-trick of away victories at The Emirates Stadium, Anfield and The Etihad Stadium. A 2-1 victory over Chelsea at the end of October had the Hammers into the top three.

An injury to star player Dimitri Payet in early November started a dreadful run of eight games without a win which dropped the Londoners into the reaches of mid-table. However, a 2-1 victory over Southampton in late December started an excellent second half of the season that took the club onto the cusp of Champions League football. A run of four successive draws ended those aspirations but West Ham finished with 62 points (a new PL best) and finished seventh in the table.

Payet was top scorer in all competitions and football ended at Upton Park with a memorable 3-2 victory over Manchester United. Winston Reid scored the final-ever goal at The Boleyn.

 

2016-2017

West Ham’s first season in their new home at The London Stadium was always going to be tricky and despite a winning start, as Michail Antonio’s header beat AFC Bournemouth, heavy defeats to Watford and Southampton highlighted how hard life would be in their new surroundings.

Dimitri Payet scored a majestic solo goal in a home draw with Middlesbrough but he wouldn’t stick around. In January, he told Slaven Bilic that he wanted to leave and refused to play for the club again. He eventually got his move back to Marseille. West Ham eventually finished in 11th position but with few fireworks on-the-pitch and some heavy beatings to the likes of Manchester City, Arsenal and Liverpool FC.

There was a 1-0 victory right at the end of the campaign against Tottenham Hotspur which effectively ended Spurs’ title aspirations and made the fans very happy.

 

2017-2018

The conclusion of the 2017 IAAF World Athletics Championships meant West Ham couldn’t play any home matches until early September. Despite the arrivals of Joe Hart on-loan, Javier Hernandez and Marko Arnautovic, there was a lack of rhythm. Three straight defeats left them pointless at the end of August.

A Friday night horror show at home to Brighton & Hove Albion in October put the pressure on Bilic and he lost his job a fortnight later with the club languishing in 17th spot. David Moyes was his successor and a 1-0 victory over champions Chelsea in December started an impressive run of form which took the club away from danger.

A 3-0 defeat at home to Burnley in March saw some unsavoury scenes inside the stadium with some fans running onto the pitch and owners David Gold and David Sullivan being asked to leave the directors box for their own safety. It looks like West Ham will stay up this season but testing times seem to lie ahead for one of the Premier League’s regular members.