Category Archives: The Clubs

The Clubs: Sheffield United

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
122 32 36 54 128 168 -40 132 3

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Carl Bradshaw 72
Paul Beesley 64
Alan Kelly 63
Glyn Hodges 62
Paul Rogers 52
Dane Whitehouse 52
Kevin Gage 48
Mitch Ward 48
Alan Cork 46
Adrian Littlejohn 46

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Brian Deane 15
Adrian Littlejohn 11
Dane Whitehouse 10
Jostein Flo 9
Rob Hulse 8
Glyn Hodges 6
Paul Rogers 6
Nathan Blake 5
Alan Cork 5
Brian Gayle 5

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Sheffield United 6-0 Tottenham Hotspur 2nd March 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 3-0 Ipswich Town 16th January 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 3-0 West Ham United 14th April 2007 2006-2007
Sheffield United 4-2 Chelsea 8th May 1993 1992-1993
Coventry City 1-3 Sheffield United 24th March 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 3-1 Swindon Town 14th August 1993 1993-1994
Sheffield United 2-0 Southampton 3rd October 1992 1992-1993
Sheffield United 2-0 Middlesbrough 9th February 1993 1992-1993
Sheffield United 2-0 Oldham Athletic 22nd February 1993 1992-1993
Nottingham Forest 0-2 Sheffield United 1st May 1993 1992-1993

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Newcastle United 4-0 Sheffield United 24th November 1993 1993-1994
Liverpool FC 4-0 Sheffield United 24th February 2007 2006-2007
Manchester United 3-0 Sheffield United 18th August 1993 1993-1994
Sheffield United 0-3 Manchester United 7th December 1993 1993-1994
Arsenal 3-0 Sheffield United 29th December 1993 1993-1994
Arsenal 3-0 Sheffield United 23rd September 2006 2006-2007
Chelsea 3-0 Sheffield United 17th March 2007 2006-2007
Aston Villa 3-0 Sheffield United 5th May 2007 2006-2007
Everton 4-2 Sheffield United 21st August 1993 1993-1994
Leeds United 3-1 Sheffield United 17th October 1992 1992-1993

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Dave Bassett 2 12th December 1995
Neil Warnock 1 15th May 2007

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Sheffield United 1-2 Wigan Athletic 13th May 2007 32,604 2006-2007
Sheffield United 0-1 Manchester City 26th December 2006 32,591 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-2 Manchester United 18th November 2006 32,584 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-2 Newcastle United 7th April 2007 32,572 2006-2007
Sheffield United 0-2 Chelsea 28th October 2006 32,321 2006-2007
Sheffield United 2-1 Tottenham Hotspur 10th February 2007 32,144 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-0 Arsenal 30th December 2006 32,086 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-1 Everton 3rd March 2007 32,019 2006-2007
Sheffield United 1-1 Liverpool FC 19th August 2006 31,726 2006-2007
Sheffield United 3-0 West Ham United 14th April 2007 31,593 2006-2007

 

Intro

It has been over 12 seasons since Sheffield United’s last dalliance with Premier League football. Their relegation on the final day of the 2006-2007 season was the second time the supporters had to deal with this heartache, having had destiny in their own hands to survive as they had on a dramatic last day in 1994. The Blades though do have the honour of scoring the first-ever goal in Premier League history thanks to Brian Deane’s fifth minute header against Manchester United in August 1992.

 

1992-1993

It was Dave Bassett who was Sheffield United manager when the Premier League began and despite working on limited resources, he kept the Blades away from relegation as they finished the inaugural campaign in 15th position, ahead of the likes of Coventry City, Southampton and reigning English champions, Leeds United.

They made Premier League history by scoring the first-ever goal in the new league on day one. Brian Deane scored it and the Yorkshire club surprised Manchester United, beating Alex Ferguson’s side 2-1. They also recorded their biggest-ever Premier League victory when Tottenham Hotspur was demolished 6-0 in March 1993. Other highlights included a Deane hat-trick to beat Ipswich 3-0 in January and victories in their final three matches, including a 2-0 success at The City Ground in Brian Clough’s final home match as manager of Nottingham Forest.

 

1993-1994

Deane had finished as top scorer in the previous campaign with 14 goals. However, he was sold in the summer of 1993 to Leeds United and goalscoring became a major problem in his absence in the 1993-1994 season. Norwegian Jostein Flo was the only player to amass double figures.

With little money to spend, Bassett’s side spent much of the campaign at the wrong end of the table but a 3-2 victory over West Ham United at the end of March started an impressive run of just one defeat in seven matches. Liverpool FC and Newcastle United were among the sides beaten in this period and that meant the Yorkshire side came into the final day of the season needing just a point to avoid relegation.

They took the lead twice against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge but were pegged back and in stoppage-time, Mark Stein scored a late winner for the home side. That goal was pivotal. Ipswich held on for a goalless draw at Blackburn and Everton’s dramatic comeback victory over Wimbledon meant Sheffield United were relegated to the First Division. They wouldn’t return to the Premier League for over 12 years.

 

2006-2007

Having finished runners-up to Reading in the Championship in the previous season, Sheffield United returned to the elite of English football with the charismatic Neil Warnock in-charge. An opening day draw with Liverpool FC was a good start and the Blades became tough to beat at Bramwall Lane. Their first victory back in the top-flight didn’t arrive until late September when a cracking Phil Jagielka shot beat Middlesbrough.

Jagielka was also the hero against Arsenal in the final match of 2006. He went in-goal after regular goalkeeper Paddy Kenny was injured but kept the Gunners out as the Blades recorded a 1-0 victory.

For much of the season, they were seven points clear of trouble but a torrid April and May meant they went into the final day still needing a point to guarantee safety. They played Wigan Athletic, who had to win or face relegation. Wigan took the lead but Jon Stead’s brave header saw the hosts equalise. However, a penalty was conceded in first half stoppage-time and David Unsworth, who had started the season as a Sheffield United player, scored for Wigan to put them infront.

Despite creating numerous openings in the second half, Sheffield United couldn’t find the goal they needed and they were relegated. The club then pursued a legal case against the FA for failing to deduct points from relegation rivals West Ham United for their part in the transfers involving Carlos Tevez and Javier Mascherano. Warnock resigned as manager three days after relegation.

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The Clubs: Norwich City

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
316 89 92 135 365 510 -145 359 8

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Russell Martin 125
Mark Bowen 119
John Ruddy 116
Wes Hoolahan 112
Ian Crook 106
Bryan Gunn 104
Jonny Howson 104
Bradley Johnson 101
John Polston 96
Sebastien Bassong 93

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Chris Sutton 33
Grant Holt 23
Mark Robins 20
Efan Ekoku 15
Anthony Pilkington 14
Wes Hoolahan 12
Robert Snodgrass 12
Ruel Fox 11
Steve Morison 10
Jeremy Goss 9

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Everton 1-5 Norwich City 25th September 1993 1993-1994
Leeds United 0-4 Norwich City 21st August 1993 1993-1994
Norwich City 4-0 West Bromwich Albion 12th May 2013 2012-2013
Nottingham Forest 0-3 Norwich City 17th March 1993 1992-1993
Norwich City 3-0 Everton 21st March 1994 1993-1994
Norwich City 3-0 Chelsea 10th December 1994 1994-1995
Norwich City 3-0 Ipswich Town 20th March 1995 1994-1995
Arsenal 2-4 Norwich City 15th August 1992 1992-1993
Norwich City 4-2 Crystal Palace 27th January 1993 1992-1993
Norwich City 4-2 Leeds United 14th April 1993 1992-1993

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester City 7-0 Norwich City 2nd November 2013 2013-2014
Blackburn Rovers 7-1 Norwich City 3rd October 1992 1992-1993
Fulham 6-0 Norwich City 15th May 2005 2004-2005
Norwich City 1-6 Manchester City 14th April 2012 2011-2012
Fulham 5-0 Norwich City 18th August 2012 2012-2013
Liverpool FC 5-0 Norwich City 19th January 2013 2012-2013
Newcastle United 6-2 Norwich City 18th October 2015 2015-2016
Tottenham Hotspur 5-1 Norwich City 9th April 1993 1992-1993
Arsenal 5-1 Norwich City 1st April 1995 1994-1995
Manchester City 5-1 Norwich City 3rd December 2011 2011-2012

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Mike Walker 2 5th January 1994
John Deehan 2 10th April 1995
Nigel Worthington 1 1st October 2006
Paul Lambert 1 1st June 2012
Chris Hughton 2 6th April 2014
Neil Adams 1 5th January 2015
Alex Neil 1 10th March 2017

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Norwich City 3-2 Newcastle United 2nd April 2016 27,137 2015-2016
Norwich City 0-1 Manchester United 7th May 2016 27,132 2015-2016
Norwich City 0-3 Sunderland 16th April 2016 27,117 2015-2016
Norwich City 4-5 Liverpool FC 23rd January 2016 27,108 2015-2016
Norwich City 2-2 West Ham United 13th February 2016 27,101 2015-2016
Norwich City 1-1 Arsenal 29th November 2015 27,091 2015-2016
Norwich City 1-2 Chelsea 1st March 2016 27,091 2015-2016
Norwich City 2-0 Aston Villa 28th December 2015 27,072 2015-2016
Norwich City 1-2 Leicester City 3rd October 2015 27,067 2015-2016
Norwich City 0-3 Tottenham Hotspur 2nd February 2016 27,067 2015-2016

 

Intro

Norwich City have always been an entertaining side to watch and that started in the very first Premier League season where they topped the table on Christmas Day 1992 and finished in third place in the final standings. Two seasons later, the policy of selling their star assets led to their downfall and relegation and since then, have experienced three further relegations under the guidance of Nigel Worthington, Neil Adams and Alex Neil. However, the Canaries have achieved other unique feats, including having the first player to score four goals in a Premier League match and being the first team to have three hat-tricks scored by the same player against them when Luis Suarez achieved the feat in his Liverpool FC days.

 

1992-1993

Considered among the relegation favourites going into the campaign under new manager Mike Walker, Norwich City made an immediate impression on the Premier League’s opening weekend, storming back from 2-0 down to beat pre-season title favourites Arsenal 4-2 at Highbury. Despite a 7-1 hammering at Blackburn Rovers in early October, the Canaries continued to defy the critics and topped the table on Christmas Day.

Helped by the goals of Mark Robins, the speedy pace of Ruel Fox down the flanks and the artistry of the experienced David Phillips in midfield, Norwich stayed firmly in the title battle until early April when they lost 3-1 at home to eventual champions Manchester United. Although they ended up with a negative goal difference, Norwich finished a brilliant third in the standings, earning European qualification for the following season.

 

1993-1994

Despite having one of the Premier League’s smallest fanbases, Norwich continued to overachieve in the early months of the 1993-1994 campaign. They dismantled Leeds United 4-0 at Elland Road, held Manchester United to a 2-2 draw at Old Trafford and recorded an excellent victory early season at Blackburn Rovers. In Europe, they became the first-ever English club to win in Munich against Bayern, knocking the German heavyweights out of the UEFA Cup in the process.

In early January, manager Mike Walker quit to take the vacancy at Everton. Walker had grown tired of seeing his better players being sold by owner Robert Chase with Ruel Fox on his way to Newcastle United. Walker’s assistant John Deehan took over the team with the Canaries in seventh place but he couldn’t sustain the momentum. He managed just two victories and that included a 10-game winless streak as the Norfolk-based club slipped to 12th place by the season’s end.

 

1994-1995

Star forward Chris Sutton was sold in a British transfer record deal to Blackburn Rovers for £5 million but although they lost some of their goalscoring threat, Norwich made a strong start to the season. They were unbeaten at Carrow Road until a Boxing Day defeat to Tottenham Hotspur and the Canaries sat seventh in the table going into Christmas. However, that is where things started to go pear-shaped.

First-choice goalkeeper Bryan Gunn suffered a serious ankle injury in a defeat at The City Ground against Nottingham Forest and no adequate replacement was brought in to replace Gunn who was out for the whole season. Forwards Efan Ekoku and Mark Robins were both sold and the club went into freefall. They achieved only one victory in their final 20 games and plunged into the relegation dogfight.

Manager John Deehan resigned in mid-April and with fan protests, petitions and a poisonous atmosphere growing around the board’s management, relegation became reality with a 2-1 loss to Leeds United on the penultimate weekend of the season.

 

2004-2005

After an absence of nine seasons, Norwich returned to the top-flight as champions of the First Division. Manager Nigel Worthington had a small squad and relied heavily on the players that helped them gain promotion. Norwich failed to win any of their first 13 matches and very quickly, it became clear that this would be a season battling to avoid relegation.

Two goals from Damien Francis helped the Canaries to a 2-1 victory over Southampton in November but that was one of just three victories up to the start of April. They began that month seven points adrift of safety but started a remarkable run with a shock 2-0 win over Sir Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United. Further wins over Newcastle United, Charlton Athletic and Birmingham City meant they escaped the relegation zone going into the final day of the campaign. Victory at Craven Cottage would secure their safety regardless of other results. However, a 6-0 defeat to Fulham ensured their instant relegation back to the second-tier of English football.

 

2011-2012

Under the guidance of Paul Lambert, Norwich enjoyed a fine first season back in the top-flight having achieved back-to-back promotions. They won three of their first eight matches and were never in any relegation danger. Apart from two heavy losses to champions Manchester City, Norwich acquitted themselves well and finished 12th with 47 points. However, Lambert left in the close season in controversial circumstances to take the manager’s role at Aston Villa.

 

2012-2013

Although they finished with three fewer points, Norwich improved to 11th in the table in the 2012-2013 campaign with Chris Hughton their new manager. This included a 10-game unbeaten run between October and December which included a 4-3 away win at Swansea City and surprising home successes against Arsenal and Manchester United. They ended the season with a handsome 4-0 victory over West Bromwich Albion and an impressive 3-2 success away to Manchester City. The only blot on the copybook was an FA Cup exit at the hands of non-league Luton Town, becoming the first top-flight side to lose in the competition to a non-league outfit in 24 years.

 

2013-2014

Norwich spent plenty of money in pre-season, including £8.5 million on Ricky van Wolfswinkel. The striker scored just once for the club as the task of replacing Grant Holt turned out to be harder than expected. Chris Hughton’s side spent most of the season in the bottom half of the Premier League table and when they lost at home to West Bromwich Albion in early April, they elected to dispense with Hughton’s services. Former player Neil Adams took over but collected just one point from the final five games of the season and they dropped into the relegation zone. Their demise was confirmed when Sunderland beat West Brom in their penultimate game of the season.

 

2015-2016

Alex Neil guided Norwich back to the Premier League within his first five months at the club and initially, started well with victories over Sunderland and AFC Bournemouth, plus a wonderful 2-1 pre-Christmas triumph over Manchester United. Norwich picked up 9 points from a possible 12 during the festive period – a record only bettered by Tottenham Hotspur but they went on a dire run of form at the start of 2016, losing seven successive matches.

Victories over West Bromwich Albion and Newcastle United did lift the gloom briefly but a 3-0 home defeat to relegation rivals Sunderland in mid-April saw them give up controlling their own destiny to the Black Cats. Sunderland’s experience at survival expertise was more than enough to consign Norwich ultimately to a fourth Premier League relegation just days before the season concluded when they beat Everton, meaning the Canaries’ 4-2 victory over Watford was made immaterial.

The Clubs: Southampton

All statistics correct upto 27th January 2019

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
753 233 208 312 912 1056 -144 907 20

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Jason Dodd 329
Claus Lundekvam 290
Matt Le Tissier 270
Francis Benali 243
Matt Oakley 232
James Beattie 202
Ken Monkou 198
Steven Davis 193
Paul Jones 191
James Ward-Prowse 176

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Matt Le Tissier 102
James Beattie 68
Marian Pahars 42
Rickie Lambert 28
Egil Ostenstad 28
Jay Rodriguez 26
Graziano Pelle 23
Kevin Phillips 23
Iain Dowie 21
Sadio Mane 21

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Southampton 8-0 Sunderland 18th October 2014 2014-2015
Southampton 6-1 Aston Villa 16th May 2015 2014-2015
Southampton 5-1 Swindon Town 25th August 1993 1993-1994
Southampton 4-0 Middlesbrough 28th September 1996 1996-1997
Leicester City 0-4 Southampton 8th December 2001 2001-2002
Southampton 4-0 Newcastle United 29th March 2014 2013-2014
Southampton 4-0 Newcastle United 13th September 2014 2014-2015
Southampton 4-0 Arsenal 26th December 2015 2015-2016
Sunderland 0-4 Southampton 11th February 2017 2016-2017
Southampton 6-3 Manchester United 26th October 1996 1996-1997

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Everton 7-1 Southampton 16th November 1996 1996-1997
Liverpool FC 7-1 Southampton 16th January 1999 1998-1999
Tottenham Hotspur 7-2 Southampton 11th March 2000 1999-2000
Manchester United 6-1 Southampton 22nd December 2001 2001-2002
Arsenal 6-1 Southampton 7th May 2003 2002-2003
Arsenal 6-1 Southampton 15th September 2012 2012-2013
Manchester City 6-1 Southampton 4th November 2018 2018-2019
Charlton Athletic 5-0 Southampton 22nd August 1998 1998-1999
Newcastle United 5-0 Southampton 16th January 2000 1999-2000
Manchester United 5-0 Southampton 28th October 2000 2000-2001

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Ian Branfoot 2 10th January 1994
Alan Ball 2 2nd July 1995
Dave Merrington 1 14th June 1996
Graeme Souness 1 1st June 1997
Dave Jones 3 27th January 2000
Glenn Hoddle 2 28th March 2001
Stuart Gray 2 21st October 2001
Gordon Strachan 3 13th February 2004
Paul Sturrock 2 23rd August 2004
Steve Wigley 1 8th December 2004
Harry Redknapp 1 3rd December 2005
Nigel Adkins 1 18th January 2013
Mauricio Pochettino 2 26th May 2014
Ronald Koeman 2 13th June 2016
Claude Puel 1 14th June 2017
Mauricio Pellegrino 1 12th March 2018
Mark Hughes 2 3rd December 2018
Ralph Hasenhüttl 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Southampton 0-1 Arsenal 29th December 2003 32,151 2003-2004
Southampton 0-1 Chelsea 22nd November 2003 32,149 2003-2004
Southampton 0-1 Liverpool FC 18th January 2003 32,104 2002-2003
Southampton 0-2 Manchester United 1st February 2003 32,085 2002-2003
Southampton 3-1 Liverpool FC 16th March 2013 32,070 2012-2013
Southampton 1-0 Manchester United 31st August 2003 32,066 2003-2004
Southampton 1-2 Manchester United 15th May 2005 32,066 2004-2005
Southampton 1-1 Newcastle United 14th December 2002 32,061 2002-2003
Southampton 2-0 Liverpool FC 14th March 2004 32,056 2003-2004
Southampton 1-1 Aston Villa 8th May 2004 32,054 2003-2004

 

Intro

Austrian Ralph Hasenhüttl recently became Southampton’s 18th permanent Premier League manager in 20 seasons of top-flight football since 1992. The Saints were an ever-present from 1992 to 2005 when three managers couldn’t save them from relegation. Administration and a drop into League One followed but Southampton returned in 2012. Their best-ever finish was 6th under Ronald Koeman in 2015-2016 although times have been much tougher since the Dutchman’s departure that summer.

 

1992-1993

Southampton’s first Premier League season started slowly, winning just two of their first 10 games as they struggled to adapt to life without Alan Shearer who had been sold in pre-season for a British transfer record fee to Blackburn Rovers. Form did improve in the second half of the year and a 4-3 win over Ipswich Town in mid-March saw the Saints hit ninth place. However, six defeats in their last eight games saw the club finish 18th and just one point above the relegation zone. Goalkeeper Tim Flowers was named Southampton Player of the Season for the second successive campaign.

 

1993-1994

For the second successive season, Southampton finished in 18th place and again, just one point clear of trouble. A point on the final day at Upton Park against West Ham United was enough to protect their top-flight status. Tim Flowers left the club in November 1993, becoming the most expensive goalkeeper in British football when he joined Blackburn Rovers for £2.4 million.

The goals of Matt Le Tissier ultimately kept Southampton afloat. Le Tissier scored 25 goals including hat-tricks against Liverpool FC and Norwich City. Unpopular boss Ian Branfoot was relieved of his duties in mid-January and was replaced by Alan Ball.

 

1994-1995

Southampton made a positive start to the 1994-1995 season, winning four of their first nine matches before a struggle in the winter months saw them slide to 20th place in the table. The goals of Matt Le Tissier once again kept Southampton away from danger and a decent run-in saw the Saints actually finish a creditable 10th, their best top-flight finish since 1990. However, manager Alan Ball resigned at the end of the season to take the post at Manchester City.

 

1995-1996

Long-serving coach Dave Merrington took charge as manager for the 1995-1996 season but it was another struggle against relegation. This time, survival was achieved only courtesy of goal difference on the final day of the season. One notable highlight was a 3-1 win over eventual champions Manchester United in April but Merrington was sacked at the end of the campaign.

 

1996-1997

Former Liverpool FC boss Graeme Souness returned to English management but couldn’t spark a huge revival in Southampton’s fortunes. For the third time in four seasons, the Saints’ survival in the top-flight was only secured on the final day, even though they lost at Villa Park. Yet again, a resounding win over Manchester United was the highlight with the Saints winning 6-3 in October against the Red Devils. Souness quit at the end of the season.

 

1997-1998

Former Stockport County manager Dave Jones was the next person to try the Southampton hotseat and he enjoyed a successful debut campaign. Although just two wins from the first 11 matches had Southampton down in 19th position, a strong winter saw the Saints move comfortably into mid-table which is where they remained for the rest of the campaign. They recorded a 3-2 win at Anfield and a third successive home victory over Manchester United. They finished in a fairly comfortable 12th place.

 

1998-1999

Southampton went backwards in 1998-1999 and a 5-0 defeat on the second weekend to debutants Charlton Athletic set the tone for a difficult season. Southampton won three of their first 20 games, collecting just 14 points and sat second-bottom going into 1999. They stayed unbeaten at home in the second half of the season and three victories in their last three matches over Leicester, Wimbledon and Everton secured Premier League safety at the expense of Charlton. Planning permission was also granted for the club to move into a new stadium on the banks of the River Itchen.

 

1999-2000

In April 2000, Matt Le Tissier became the first midfielder to score 100 Premier League goals when he struck from the penalty spot in a 2-1 defeat to Sunderland. Southampton finished in 15th place with 44 points and well-clear of any relegation danger. Dave Jones stepped down towards the end of January to concentrate on clearing his name in connection with child abuse charges. Former England and Chelsea boss Glenn Hoddle replaced him as manager.

 

2000-2001

After 103 years, Southampton said goodbye to The Dell as they prepared to move into St Mary’s. They bid farewell in-style with a 3-2 victory on the final day against Arsenal with club legend Matt Le Tissier scoring an 89th-minute winner in what turned out to be his last-ever Premier League goal. Southampton finished in 10th position but lost manager Glenn Hoddle’s services in late March when he walked out on the club to take over at the club he represented as a player, Tottenham Hotspur.

 

2001-2002

Stuart Gray, who had finished the season as caretaker manager following Glenn Hoddle’s departure, led Southampton into the 2001-2002 season but was sacked in October after a terrible start to the season. Gordon Strachan took over and galvanised the club to an 11th place finish, recording their first-ever victory at St Mary’s in late November against Charlton Athletic. At the end of the season, Matt Le Tissier announced his retirement from professional football.

 

2002-2003

Southampton languished in the drop zone after eight matches but a run of just two losses from their next 15 encounters including an unbeaten home record until mid-January when Liverpool FC won 1-0 at St Mary’s saw them climb into the top half. Manchester United were the only other team to win on the south coast as Southampton finished in a best-ever Premier League finish of eighth. James Beattie was the highest English goalscorer and there was also a run to the FA Cup final which ended with a narrow 1-0 defeat to Arsenal at Cardiff’s Millennium Stadium.

 

2003-2004

Southampton started strongly and even enjoyed a 1-0 home victory over reigning champions Manchester United in August courtesy of a late Beattie goal. They sat in fourth place in the table on Christmas Day but finished ultimately only in 12th spot. Gordon Strachan resigned as manager in mid-February to take a break from football management. He was ultimately replaced by Paul Sturrock after supporters opposed owner Rupert Lowe’s initial plan to bring back Glenn Hoddle to the club.

 

2004-2005

Just two games into the season, Paul Sturrock left by mutual consent after rumours of player unrest. He was succeeded by his first-team coach Steve Wigley but results didn’t improve and from early November, it became clear that Southampton were to be embroiled in a four-way relegation dogfight with the newly-promoted trio, Norwich City, West Bromwich Albion and Crystal Palace.

In December, Wigley was sacked and Harry Redknapp was drafted in following his departure from arch-rivals Portsmouth. Form did marginally improve and there were notable wins over Liverpool FC and Middlesbrough but Southampton were still in the bottom three going into the final day of the season. A 2-1 home defeat to Manchester United condemned the Saints to relegation from the top-flight, ending their 13-season run in the Premier League.

 

2012-2013

After achieving back-to-back promotions, Southampton returned to the elite in 2012 after a seven-season absence. The Saints made a terrible start, losing five of their first six matches including a 6-1 loss at Arsenal but rallied from November onwards and always looked like they had enough to survive. It was a shock then to see Nigel Adkins parting company with the club in January, two days after coming from 2-0 down to draw 2-2 at Chelsea. He was replaced by Mauricio Pochettino who impressed many with his style of play. Southampton finished 14th, five points clear of any danger.

 

2013-2014

Mauricio Pochettino’s first full season in English management saw him guide Southampton to an excellent eighth position in the Premier League table, surpassing their best-ever points tally in the process. Pochettino’s determination to promote English youth saw Adam Lallana, Luke Shaw and Jay Rodriguez all win their maiden England senior caps although a terrible knee injury in early April at Manchester City ended Rodriguez’s chances of going to the World Cup. Pochettino became a man in high demand during the season and he would leave in the summer to take over as manager of Tottenham Hotspur.

 

2014-2015

Pre-season was a concern for Southampton fans. Pochettino had gone and was replaced by Ronald Koeman, whilst Rickie Lambert, Luke Shaw, Dejan Lovren and Adam Lallana all left for higher-profile clubs. However, any relegation fears were quickly dispelled as Koeman’s team gelled together and was a contender for the UEFA Champions League qualification places all the way until early March. They eventually finished seventh which was still a best-ever Premier League finish and also recorded their biggest-ever Premier League win; an 8-0 mauling of Sunderland in October.

 

2015-2016

Nathaniel Clyne and Morgan Schneiderlin were the next key players to depart Southampton but yet again, Koeman’s side continued to defy the critics. The signing of Virgil van Dijk from Celtic was a smart piece of business. Southampton enjoyed a fantastic Boxing Day, defeating Arsenal 4-0 whilst Chelsea were also overcome 3-1 at Stamford Bridge and Tottenham Hotspur defeated 2-1 on the penultimate weekend. Despite falling to 14th position in early January, Southampton recovered brilliantly and secured sixth position on the final day of the season, earning another campaign of European football in the process.

 

2016-2017

After two full seasons at the helm, Ronald Koeman controversially left his position as Southampton manager to join Everton and he was replaced by Claude Puel. Under the Frenchman’s guidance, the Saints finished in eighth position and reached the League Cup final. However, home supporters were frustrated by a more sterile style of football deployed by Puel and he was dismissed at the end of the season by the board.

 

2017-2018

Southampton turned to Mauricio Pellegrino to fill the managerial position but the appointment was disastrous. The Saints recorded just seven league victories all season with the highlight being an impressive 4-1 win over Everton at the end of November. Virgil van Dijk was sold to Liverpool FC during the season for £75 million and Pellegrino was fired in March after a limp display and 3-0 defeat at St James’ Park. Former player Mark Hughes came in as manager and saved the club from relegation, helped by a Manolo Gabbiadini winner in the final week of the season at Swansea which kept Southampton safe at the expense of the Swans.

 

2018-2019

Having kept Southampton safe, Mark Hughes stayed on as manager but he managed just one victory away at Crystal Palace in September and he was dismissed in early December after a 2-2 draw with an out-of-form Manchester United. His successor was the former RB Leipzig coach Ralph Hasenhüttl, who has spearheaded the Saints to victories over Arsenal, Huddersfield Town, Leicester City and Everton which has given supporters hope that the club can avoid relegation once again this season.

The Clubs: Nottingham Forest

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
198 60 59 79 229 287 -58 239 5

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Steve Chettle 174
Mark Crossley 162
Ian Woan 132
Scot Gemmill 128
Stuart Pearce 123
Steve Stone 118
Des Lyttle 113
Colin Cooper 108
Bryan Roy 84
David Phillips 83

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Bryan Roy 24
Stan Collymore 22
Stuart Pearce 18
Ian Woan 17
Steve Stone 16
Jason Lee 12
Nigel Clough 11
Kevin Campbell 9
Gary Bannister 8
Colin Cooper 8

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Sheffield Wednesday 1-7 Nottingham Forest 1st April 1995 1994-1995
Leeds United 1-4 Nottingham Forest 5th December 1992 1992-1993
Nottingham Forest 4-1 Sheffield Wednesday 10th September 1994 1994-1995
Tottenham Hotspur 1-4 Nottingham Forest 24th September 1994 1994-1995
Nottingham Forest 4-1 Ipswich Town 10th December 1994 1994-1995
Nottingham Forest 4-1 Wimbledon 6th November 1995 1995-1996
Nottingham Forest 3-0 Chelsea 16th January 1993 1992-1993
Nottingham Forest 3-0 Southampton 18th March 1995 1994-1995
Nottingham Forest 3-0 Leeds United 22nd March 1995 1994-1995
Nottingham Forest 3-0 Manchester City 30th September 1995 1995-1996

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Nottingham Forest 1-8 Manchester United 6th February 1999 1998-1999
Blackburn Rovers 7-0 Nottingham Forest 18th November 1995 1995-1996
Manchester United 5-0 Nottingham Forest 28th April 1996 1995-1996
Newcastle United 5-0 Nottingham Forest 11th May 1997 1996-1997
Nottingham Forest 1-5 Blackburn Rovers 13th April 1996 1995-1996
Liverpool FC 5-1 Nottingham Forest 24th October 1998 1998-1999
Nottingham Forest 0-4 Manchester United 26th December 1996 1996-1997
Coventry City 4-0 Nottingham Forest 9th January 1999 1998-1999
Blackburn Rovers 4-1 Nottingham Forest 5th September 1992 1992-1993
Nottingham Forest 1-4 Sunderland 21st August 1996 1996-1997

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Brian Clough 1 8th May 1993
Frank Clark 3 19th December 1996
Stuart Pearce 1 30th June 1997
Dave Bassett 1 5th January 1999
Ron Atkinson 1 30th June 1999

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Nottingham Forest 1-8 Manchester United 6th February 1999 30,025 1998-1999
Nottingham Forest 1-1 Manchester United 27th November 1995 29,263 1995-1996
Nottingham Forest 1-1 Liverpool FC 15th March 1997 29,181 1996-1997
Nottingham Forest 1-0 Liverpool FC 23rd March 1996 29.058 1995-1996
Nottingham Forest 0-4 Manchester United 26th December 1996 29,032 1996-1997
Nottingham Forest 1-0 Manchester City 6th May 1995 28,882 1994-1995
Nottingham Forest 2-2 Tottenham Hotspur 4th March 1995 28,711 1994-1995
Nottingham Forest 2-2 Liverpool FC 5th April 1999 28,374 1998-1999
Nottingham Forest 1-1 West Ham United 8th April 1995 28,361 1994-1995
Nottingham Forest 2-0 Chelsea 11th January 1997 28,358 1996-1997

 

Intro

It has been nearly 20 years now since Nottingham Forest last graced the top-flight of English football. They still remain one of the biggest teams outside of the Premier League and still one of the most successful sides to have graced the European Cup following those back-to-back victories in 1979 and 1980. Forest have been relegated in three of their five Premier League seasons but also finished a fantastic third under the guidance of the shrewd Frank Clark in the 1994-1995 season.

 

1992-1993

Nottingham Forest began the new season with victory over Liverpool FC in the very-first live match on Sky Sports in the new league with Teddy Sheringham scoring the only goal of the game. Sheringham was sold shortly afterwards though to Tottenham Hotspur and the club followed up this Liverpool victory with six successive defeats. They were six points from safety going into the New Year.

A brief revival early in 1993 saw them climb out of the relegation zone at the end of February but just two wins from their last 10 matches saw their fate slide out of their control. On the eve of the final home match of the season against Sheffield United, legendary manager Brian Clough announced he was retiring from football management. Sadly, there was no happy ending. Forest lost 2-0 to the Blades and were relegated to the First Division. Clough would be replaced by Frank Clark.

 

1994-1995

After impressing at the World Cup finals with the Netherlands, Bryan Roy was signed by Frank Clark to help lead Nottingham Forest’s attack on their top-flight return. They enjoyed a brilliant season, staying unbeaten in their first 11 matches and sitting in second spot for much of the first three months of the campaign. After a 2-0 loss at home to Blackburn Rovers, there was a six-game winless sequence but Clark’s side continued to figure inside the top six throughout the season.

Stan Collymore scored 22 goals and he was also the first player in the season to score at Old Trafford when Forest pulled off a stunning 2-1 victory away at the reigning champions. In April, they recorded the biggest away victory of the season, thumping Sheffield Wednesday 7-1 at Hillsborough. A draw on the final weekend away at Wimbledon ensured a third place finish and UEFA Cup football for the following season. No promoted club has finished higher than this in Premier League history.

 

1995-1996

Progress at Nottingham Forest stuttered in 1995-1996 after Collymore was sold in the summer to Liverpool FC for a British transfer record fee. Andrea Silenzi was signed as his replacement and proved to be a complete flop although the additions of Kevin Campbell from Arsenal and Chris Bart-Williams from Sheffield Wednesday were useful acquisitions.

Again, they enjoyed a lengthy unbeaten start to the season. A 12-match unbeaten sequence which culminated with a 4-1 victory at home to Wimbledon in early November took Clark’s side into third place in the table. Two weeks later, that unbeaten run ended dramatically with a 7-0 beating away at Blackburn Rovers. Their domestic season never quite recovered from that demoralising performance and Forest faded to ninth place and mid-table mediocrity.

Ian Woan sparkled and scored a crucial long-range effort to deny Newcastle United a vital victory in their title run-in challenge whilst a quarter-final run in the UEFA Cup was the best effort from a British team in European competition that season.

 

1996-1997

Nottingham Forest topped the table after the opening round of fixtures when Kevin Campbell scored a hat-trick on a scorching afternoon at Highfield Road against Coventry City. That 3-0 victory was the high point in a dreadful campaign for the club. Frank Clark failed to win another league match during his reign and in mid-December; he resigned after a 4-2 loss at Anfield. Club captain Stuart Pearce was given the opportunity to manage the team and he did spearhead a shock victory over Arsenal in his first match in-charge.

A three-game winning sequence at the start of January took the Midlands side out of the bottom three but Dean Saunders’ winner at White Hart Lane in early March would turn out to be the last victory of the season for Nottingham Forest. They collected just six points from their remaining 11 fixtures and were relegated on the final Saturday of the season after failing to beat Wimbledon at home. Pearce left at the end of the season to continue his playing career at Newcastle United and was replaced by Dave Bassett.

 

1998-1999

After romping away with the First Division title in 1998, Nottingham Forest made an instant return to the Premier League but their plans were thrown in disarray when unhappy that Kevin Campbell had been sold to Trabzonspor, star striker Pierre van Hooijdonk went on-strike in the summer!

Forest did win two of their opening three games but soon fell into trouble and didn’t record another victory until the end of January. By then, Van Hooijdonk had returned to the club and Dave Bassett was sacked following an FA Cup loss to First Division Portsmouth. Ron Atkinson answered the call to save the sinking ship but even he couldn’t prevent the inevitable.

Van Hooijdonk did score a winner at Goodison Park in Atkinson’s second game in-charge but a week later, they lost 8-1 at home to Manchester United in a scoreline that still remains as the biggest home defeat in Premier League history. Relegation was confirmed at the end of April at Villa Park, although they did win their last three matches of the season against Sheffield Wednesday, Blackburn Rovers and Leicester City.

The Clubs: Liverpool FC

All statistics correct upto 10th January 2019

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
1021 516 258 247 1734 1034 +700 1806 27

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Jamie Carragher 508
Steven Gerrard 504
Sami Hyypia 318
Pepe Reina 285
Robbie Fowler 266
Lucas 247
Martin Skrtel 242
Steve McManaman 240
John Arne Riise 234
Jamie Redknapp 231

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Robbie Fowler 128
Steven Gerrard 121
Michael Owen 118
Luis Suarez 69
Fernando Torres 65
Dirk Kuyt 51
Daniel Sturridge 51
Ian Rush 45
Mohamed Salah 45
Roberto Firmino 44

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Liverpool FC 7-1 Southampton 16th January 1999 1998-1999
Liverpool FC 6-0 Manchester City 28th October 1995 1995-1996
Ipswich Town 0-6 Liverpool FC 9th February 2002 2001-2002
West Bromwich Albion 0-6 Liverpool FC 26th April 2003 2002-2003
Liverpool FC 6-0 Derby County 1st September 2007 2007-2008
Newcastle United 0-6 Liverpool FC 27th April 2013 2012-2013
Aston Villa 0-6 Liverpool FC 14th February 2016 2015-2016
Crystal Palace 1-6 Liverpool FC 20th August 1994 1994-1995
Liverpool FC 6-1 Hull City 26th September 2009 2009-2010
Liverpool FC 6-1 Watford 6th November 2016 2016-2017

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Stoke City 6-1 Liverpool FC 24th May 2015 2014-2015
Manchester City 5-0 Liverpool FC 9th September 2017 2017-2018
Coventry City 5-1 Liverpool FC 19th December 1992 1992-1993
Chelsea 4-0 Liverpool FC 16th December 2001 2001-2002
Manchester United 4-0 Liverpool FC 5th April 2003 2002-2003
Tottenham Hotspur 4-0 Liverpool FC 18th September 2011 2011-2012
Blackburn Rovers 4-1 Liverpool FC 3rd April 1993 1992-1993
Chelsea 4-1 Liverpool FC 25th April 1998 1997-1998
Liverpool FC 1-4 Chelsea 2nd October 2005 2005-2006
Arsenal 4-1 Liverpool FC 4th April 2015 2014-2015

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Graeme Souness 2 28th January 1994
Roy Evans 6 11th November 1998
Gerard Houllier 6 30th June 2004
Rafa Benitez 6 3rd June 2010
Roy Hodgson 1 7th January 2011
Kenny Dalglish 2 16th May 2012
Brendan Rodgers 4 4th October 2015
Jurgen Klopp 4  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Liverpool FC 4-1 Cardiff City 27th October 2018 53,373 2018-2019
Liverpool FC 1-0 Brighton & Hove Albion 25th August 2018 53,294 2018-2019
Liverpool FC 2-2 AFC Bournemouth 5th April 2017 53,292 2016-2017
Liverpool FC 2-0 Newcastle United 3rd March 2018 53,287 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 5-0 Watford 17th March 2018 53,287 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 4-3 Manchester City 14th January 2018 53,285 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 3-0 Huddersfield Town 28th October 2017 53,268 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 3-0 Southampton 18th November 2017 53,256 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 4-1 West Ham United 24th February 2018 53,256 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 0-0 Stoke City 28th April 2018 53,255 2017-2018

 

Intro

Liverpool FC is one of just six teams to have featured in every single Premier League season but their wait for a league championship goes on. It is now 29 years since the top-flight title arrived in the Anfield trophy cabinet and that was before the Premier League era. The Reds have experienced some near-misses under Roy Evans (1997), Gerard Houllier (2002), Rafa Benitez (2009) and Brendan Rodgers (2014). However, Jurgen Klopp’s current set of players are in a fantastic position to end the league famine – remaining unbeaten through the first half of the current campaign.

 

1992-1993

Manager Graeme Souness continued to reshape an ageing squad, signing goalkeeper David James and forward Paul Stewart but the Reds showed no consistency throughout the inaugural Premier League season. They were in the bottom half for much of the campaign and only a run of seven wins in their last 12 matches took the Reds into a fortunate finish of sixth position in the table. His absence from the 6-2 final day win over Tottenham Hotspur because of being on a ‘scouting mission’ increased speculation his tenure at Anfield was coming to an end.

 

1993-1994

Liverpool FC started 1993-1994 with three successive victories and things seemed to be looking up but the inconsistency remained and they were a lowly 13th in the table on Christmas Day. There was a rousing comeback from 3-0 down to draw 3-3 with Manchester United in early January but weeks later, Souness departed after a humiliating FA Cup exit at home to Bristol City. Roy Evans was promoted into the managerial hotseat and guided the club to eighth position in the final table, also allowing hotshot Robbie Fowler to make his mark in the first-team.

 

1994-1995

Liverpool FC became winners once again in Evans’ first full season as manager with two Steve McManaman goals guiding them to victory in the League Cup final over Bolton Wanderers. In the Premier League, there were also radical improvements with a fourth place finish despite failing to beat Everton in either Merseyside Derby, plus a 1-0 home loss to bottom club Ipswich Town.

 

1995-1996

Having paid a national record £8.5 million for Nottingham Forest striker Stan Collymore in the close season, Liverpool FC were many people’s favourites for the league title in 1995-1996 but they fell short, finishing third in the table behind Manchester United and Newcastle United. For the second year in a row, Robbie Fowler won the PFA Young Player of the Year award and finished runner-up to Alan Shearer in the race for the Golden Boot. November was the month where Liverpool’s challenge for the title ultimately died, collecting just one point from 12 available.

 

1996-1997

1996-1997 was a missed opportunity for Liverpool FC who topped the table going into New Years’ Day, holding a five-point advantage. However, they dropped silly points at Anfield, including a shock 2-1 home loss to bottom-placed Coventry City in early April. There was also David James, who made a series of errors which earned him the nickname ‘Calamity James,’ and the ‘Spice Boys’ culture with the media believing some of the players preferring partying and socialising to winning football matches. The Reds finished fourth, missing out on a second-place finish on goal difference and pressure started to grow on Evans’ management.

 

1997-1998

The emergence of 18-year-old Michael Owen was the highlight in an unspectacular season for the club. Owen won the PFA Young Player of the Year award and was the joint-winner of the Golden Boot alongside Dion Dublin and Chris Sutton. Owen’s goals came at a good time as Robbie Fowler’s progress was stalled by a serious knee injury in the closing stages of February’s 1-1 Merseyside Derby draw. Liverpool FC finished third, a distant 13 points behind champions Arsenal.

 

1998-1999

The Liverpool FC board decided to act on previous shortcomings by bringing in Gerard Houllier to work alongside Roy Evans as joint-managers. It was a partnership that never looked like working out. Despite amassing 10 points from their first four matches, including a quick-fire Owen hat-trick at St James’ Park, the writing was on the wall from the moment Liverpool drew 3-3 at home with newly-promoted Charlton Athletic. After a League Cup defeat at home to Tottenham Hotspur, Evans resigned in mid-November with the club only 11th in the Premier League table.

Houllier was left in sole charge but fortunes continued to flirt from a 7-1 thumping of Southampton to a 1-0 loss at The Valley to Charlton. Liverpool finished a poor seventh in the table but Owen finished joint-holder of the Golden Boot for the second season running. However, Steve McManaman would leave at the end of the season for Real Madrid via the Bosman ruling.

 

1999-2000

Houllier made seven close-season signings and with former defender Phil Thompson installed as assistant manager, Liverpool started to recover and become a leading Premier League force again. There were still bumps in the road with home defeats to Watford and Everton, plus an FA Cup exit to First Division Blackburn Rovers. However, Liverpool challenged for UEFA Champions League qualification all season. A five-game winning run and the £11 million signing of Emile Heskey took Liverpool into second spot before a bad end to the season with no wins and no goals from their last five outings cost the Reds a top three finish. Fourth place was the final outcome.

 

2000-2001

Nick Barmby made the move across Stanley Park, whilst Gary McAllister and Christian Ziege were also added to an increased strength in-depth in the squad. Liverpool FC enjoyed a trophy-laden season with their own unique treble of cups, winning the League Cup, FA Cup and UEFA Cup. In the Premier League, a 4-0 final day win over Charlton Athletic at The Valley secured third place and a spot in the following season’s UEFA Champions League. Steven Gerrard’s development continued as the youngster won PFA Young Player of the Year honours and there was also a memorable league double over bitter rivals Manchester United for the first time in the Premier League era.

 

2001-2002

In mid-October at half-time of a Premier League match with Leeds United, Gerard Houllier was rushed to hospital complaining of chest pains. He required emergency heart surgery and was out of action for five months. Phil Thompson stepped into the breach and did remarkably well to keep the Reds fighting on two fronts, despite a run of one win in nine Premier League matches during the winter months.

Michael Owen’s stock continued to rise as he won the Ballon d’Or and there was another league double over Manchester United with Danny Murphy scoring the winner at Old Trafford for the second season running.

Houllier returned to the dugout in mid-March and spearheaded Liverpool FC to their best-ever Premier League finish of second spot and 80 points achieved, only finishing behind Arsenal. Second spot was achieved on the final day by a 5-0 home victory over Ipswich with John Arne Riise, one of the signings of the season, scoring twice.

 

2002-2003

Liverpool FC’s domestic service was faultless in the early months with the club stringing together a 12-match unbeaten run. However, a late 1-0 reverse to Middlesbrough in November started a calamitous run of 11 games without a victory that dropped the Reds out of the title race. By early January, they sat seventh and in severe danger of missing out on a top-four finish.

Houllier’s signings of Salif Diao, Bruno Cheyrou and El-Hadji Diouf all turned out to be expensive flops but a second League Cup triumph in three years softened the blow of an average league season which ended with defeat at Chelsea, a fifth place finish and only UEFA Cup football at Anfield for the following campaign.

 

2003-2004

Houllier attempted to revive his fortunes with the arrival of Harry Kewell from Leeds United whilst Djibril Cisse was signed for the following campaign from Auxerre. Injuries plagued Liverpool’s campaign with Jamie Carragher, Milan Baros, Steve Finnan and Owen all missing significant portions of the season but Liverpool’s league form was poor. 1-0 victories away at Chelsea and Manchester United were the only major highlights. Liverpool scraped a fourth place finish but eight days after the season concluded, Houllier’s tenure was brought to an end by the board with the club finishing a whopping 30 points behind unbeaten champions Arsenal in the final standings.

 

2004-2005

After winning two La Liga titles in three seasons and the UEFA Cup, Rafa Benitez arrived in June to replace Houllier. He managed to persuade his high-profile skipper Steven Gerrard to stay on but Michael Owen departed in an £8 million move to Real Madrid. Once again, injuries marred Liverpool’s domestic challenge and they finished fifth and even further behind the league champions – 37 points this time off Chelsea’s searing pace.

However, LFC’s campaign was all about their UEFA Champions League run. Gerrard’s dramatic strike against Olympiacos saw the club progress into the knockout rounds where the champions of Italy Juventus and new English champions Chelsea were both dumped out. In the final in Istanbul, Liverpool fell 3-0 down to AC Milan but stormed back to 3-3 in a miraculous recovery, led by the inspirational Gerrard. Jerzy Dudek’s heroics in the penalty shootout saw Liverpool record a historic fifth European Cup triumph, keeping the famous trophy in the Anfield trophy cabinet for good.

 

2005-2006

As Champions of Europe, Liverpool FC were now firmly back among the elite of European football. 2005-2006 saw more trophy glory for Rafa Benitez and Gerrard once again led by example, scoring twice in a thrilling FA Cup final against West Ham United which saw the Merseysiders triumph on penalties again. There was also progress in the Premier League. Despite a stuttering start, Liverpool produced two lengthy winning sequences during the league campaign on their way to third place and a new points-high tally of 82 points. Gerrard won the PFA Players’ Player of the Year and Robbie Fowler was re-signed, five years after leaving for Leeds United.

 

2006-2007

Liverpool FC’s failure to win away from Anfield or score in open play on their travels until early December scuppered any chances of a title tilt. The Reds finished third again but further off the pace set by Manchester United and Chelsea. Peter Crouch scored a perfect hat-trick in a 4-1 win over Arsenal whilst Robbie Fowler said an emotional farewell to his boyhood club in his second spell. Once again, the UEFA Champions League dominated Liverpool’s season with another final appearance against AC Milan – although this time, it ended in defeat in Athens.

 

2007-2008

Fernando Torres was acquired for a club-record transfer fee as Liverpool FC looked to bridge the gap between them and the regular championship contenders. Torres did score 24 times in the Premier League and the Reds stayed unbeaten until mid-December. There were just four league defeats but too many draws proved costly for LFC and Benitez as they finished fourth – 11 points clear of fifth place Everton but also, 11 points behind the champions Manchester United.

 

2008-2009

Liverpool FC launched their closest title tilt, finishing just four points shy of Manchester United, having lost just two matches and scored more goals than any other side in the division. Steven Gerrard put in another immaculate individual campaign which saw him win the Football Writers’ Award and the Reds stayed unbeaten all throughout the season at Anfield. Unfortunately, seven home draws against the likes of Stoke City, Fulham and West Ham United would have significant damage and dropping these points would be a decisive factor. The club also said a fond farewell to Sami Hyypia. The Finn left at the end of the season for Bayer 04 Leverkusen after 10 years, 318 appearances and plenty of memorable memories.

 

2009-2010

Selling Xabi Alonso in pre-season to Real Madrid and replacing him with injury-plagued Alberto Aquilani was the beginning of the end for Rafa Benitez. Liverpool FC had a miserable season which included a group stage exit from the UEFA Champions League and FA Cup demise at the hands of Reading at Anfield. It wasn’t much better in the league. The Reds finished a distant seventh and a deteriorating relationship with American owners Tom Hicks and George Gillett sealed Benitez’s fate. The Spaniard left the club in June whilst Hicks and Gillett put Liverpool FC up for sale.

 

2010-2011

LMA Manager of the Year Roy Hodgson succeeded Rafa Benitez as Liverpool FC manager but struggled badly to get the best out of his players. Liverpool’s decline reached drastic proportions in early October when they lost at home to newly-promoted Blackpool, leaving them in the bottom three. Meanwhile, the club was sold to Fenway Sports Group, who persisted with Hodgson until early January. He left after a 3-1 loss to Blackburn Rovers left Liverpool 12th in the Premier League and only four points above the relegation zone.

Playing legend and former manager Kenny Dalglish returned in a caretaker capacity until the end of the season and steered the club to a sixth place finish. Liverpool also bought Luis Suarez and Andy Carroll in the January transfer window, whilst selling star striker Fernando Torres to Chelsea for a British transfer record fee of £50 million.

 

2011-2012

Dalglish was given a three-year contract to stay on as manager and signed the likes of Charlie Adam, Stewart Downing and Jordan Henderson in pre-season. Liverpool FC had a quiet season in the Premier League, finishing only eighth in the table and below Merseyside rivals Everton for only the second time in 20 years. The main incident was Luis Suarez being found guilty of racially abusing Patrice Evra during a Premier League match against Manchester United. Suarez was given an eight-match ban. Although Liverpool won the League Cup final on penalties and reached the FA Cup final, Dalglish was sacked four days after the season ended due to their poor final league position.

 

2012-2013

It was Swansea City manager Brendan Rodgers who was selected as Dalglish’s successor and Rodgers added Philippe Coutinho and Daniel Sturridge to the squad in the January transfer window, forming the formidable ‘SAS’ partnership with Luis Suarez. Suarez finished as runner-up to Robin van Persie in the race for the Golden Boot but again, committed a serious act on-the-pitch with a biting incident on Chelsea defender Branislav Ivanovic which landed the Uruguayan with a 10-match ban. Liverpool FC finished seventh in the table and the club’s highest-ever Premier League appearance maker, Jamie Carragher retired at the end of the season to start a television punditry career with Sky Sports.

 

2013-2014

Liverpool FC scored over 100 Premier League goals and produced some memorable moments in a titanic Premier League title scrap with Manchester City, Arsenal and Chelsea. The Reds thrashed Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 at White Hart Lane, commandingly defeated outgoing champions Manchester United 3-0 at Old Trafford and scored an extraordinary four goals in the first 20 minutes of a 5-1 rout against Arsenal.

An emotional 3-2 victory over Manchester City in mid-April put Liverpool in control of their fate and it looked like the league championship might be heading back to Anfield. Unfortunately, Steven Gerrard’s crucial slip against Chelsea allowed Demba Ba in to score the first goal of the Blues’ 2-0 victory at Anfield two weeks after the City victory. A late collapse at Selhurst Park a week later effectively handed Manchester City the title which they secured on the last day of the season.

A rejuvenated Luis Suarez won the Golden Boot with 31 goals and swept the board in the main individual awards. He would leave that summer in a £75 million move to Barcelona after another biting incident whilst playing at the World Cup finals for Uruguay.

 

2014-2015

After the runners-up finish in 2013-2014, hopes were high for a Liverpool FC title challenge in 2014-2015 but they simply failed to materialise. A poor start with seven losses recorded by mid-November plus the failed gamble with signing Mario Balotelli meant the Reds played no significant part in the title race.

A calamitous 6-1 final day defeat away at Stoke City left Liverpool in a distant sixth place whilst legendary skipper Steven Gerrard decided to leave at the end of the season and finish his playing career with LA Galaxy in the United States. Gerrard made 504 Premier League appearances across 17 years, scoring 121 goals but the main Premier League prize would ultimately elude him.

 

2015-2016

Liverpool’s board decided to stick with Brendan Rodgers but just three wins from the club’s first eight matches left the Reds in mid-table in early October. Hours after a 1-1 draw at Goodison Park with Everton, Rodgers was sacked and replaced by Jurgen Klopp. Klopp’s ‘gegenpress’ style brought about impressive victories over Chelsea and Manchester City, plus a Boxing Day triumph over eventual champions Leicester City. Liverpool finished in eighth place and reached both the League Cup and UEFA Europa League finals, losing both.

 

2016-2017

Jurgen Klopp’s first full season in the Liverpool FC dugout saw the club return to the elite of European football as they qualified for the UEFA Champions League with a fourth place finish. Klopp added Sadio Mane and Georginio Wijnaldum to his squad in pre-season and Liverpool made an early impression with a thrilling 4-3 victory over Arsenal on the opening weekend. Liverpool sat second on New Years’ Day but just one win from their opening six matches in 2017 saw the club drop to fifth. Important wins included Emre Can’s spectacular Goal of the Season strike to defeat Watford before a final day 3-0 victory over Middlesbrough saw the Merseysiders edge out Arsenal to a spot in Europe’s premier club competition for the following season.

 

2017-2018

Liverpool FC signed Mohamed Salah in the summer from AS Roma and the Egyptian enjoyed an extraordinary season, breaking the record for most goals scored in a 38-game Premier League season, as well as winning the Golden Boot and PFA Players’ Player of the Year. Salah’s goals helped Liverpool to finish in fourth place for the second successive season, although they were 25 points adrift of runaway champions Manchester City.

There was also a memorable run to the UEFA Champions League final which ended with a 3-1 defeat to Real Madrid whilst Virgil van Dijk was signed in January for a new world record fee for a defender, costing the club £75 million from Southampton.

 

2018-2019

Following Loris Karius’ miserable night in the Champions League final, Klopp finally addressed the goalkeeping issue by paying AS Roma over £65 million for Brazilian no.1 Allison. Liverpool have made an extraordinary start to the season, remaining undefeated until a recent 2-1 loss to Manchester City. They have dropped just nine points in their first 21 matches of the season and hold a four-point lead at the top of the table.

Highlights include a 5-1 thrashing of Arsenal, Divock Origi’s crazy and dramatic last-gasp winner in December’s Merseyside Derby and a 3-1 success over Manchester United which led to the Red Devils sacking Jose Mourinho two days later.

The Clubs: Crystal Palace

All statistics correct upto 9th January 2019

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
368 103 93 175 393 537 -144 402 10

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Joel Ward 162
Jason Puncheon 153
Wilfried Zaha 147
James McArthur 143
Damien Delaney 130
Scott Dann 123
Wayne Hennessey 105
Yohan Cabaye 96
Andros Townsend 93
Martin Kelly 92

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Wilfried Zaha 25
Chris Armstrong 23
Andy Johnson 21
Christian Benteke 18
Luka Milivojevic 18
James McArthur 16
Dwight Gayle 15
Jason Puncheon 15
Scott Dann 12
Yannick Bolasie 9

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Crystal Palace 5-0 Leicester City 28th April 2018 2017-2018
Crystal Palace 5-1 Newcastle United 28th November 2015 2015-2016
Crystal Palace 4-0 Hull City 14th May 2017 2016-2017
Crystal Palace 4-1 Middlesbrough 12th April 1993 1992-1993
Coventry City 1-4 Crystal Palace 2nd November 1994 1994-1995
Sunderland 1-4 Crystal Palace 11th April 2015 2014-2015
Crystal Palace 4-1 Stoke City 18th September 2016 2016-2017
Crystal Palace 3-0 Ipswich Town 5th November 1994 1994-1995
Crystal Palace 3-0 Tottenham Hotspur 22nd January 2005 2004-2005
Cardiff City 0-3 Crystal Palace 5th April 2014 2013-2014

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Crystal Palace 1-6 Liverpool FC 20th August 1994 1994-1995
Liverpool FC 5-0 Crystal Palace 28th November 1992 1992-1993
Manchester City 5-0 Crystal Palace 6th May 2017 2016-2017
Manchester City 5-0 Crystal Palace 23rd September 2017 2017-2018
Chelsea 6-2 Crystal Palace 11th March 1998 1997-1998
Arsenal 5-1 Crystal Palace 14th February 2005 2004-2005
Wimbledon 4-0 Crystal Palace 9th April 1993 1992-1993
Everton 4-0 Crystal Palace 10th April 2005 2004-2005
Manchester City 4-0 Crystal Palace 16th January 2016 2015-2016
Crystal Palace 0-4 Sunderland 4th February 2017 2016-2017

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Steve Coppell 1 17th May 1993
Alan Smith 1 15th May 1995
Steve Coppell 1 13th March 1998
Iain Dowie 1 22nd May 2006
Ian Holloway 1 23rd October 2013
Tony Pulis 1 14th August 2014
Neil Warnock 1 27th December 2014
Alan Pardew 3 22nd December 2016
Sam Allardyce 1 23rd May 2017
Frank de Boer 1 11th September 2017
Roy Hodgson 2  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Crystal Palace 0-2 Manchester United 21st April 1993 30,115 1992-1993
Crystal Palace 1-3 Tottenham Hotspur 23rd January 2016 28,467 2015-2016
Crystal Palace 1-1 Arsenal 6th November 2004 26,193 2004-2005
Crystal Palace 0-3 Chelsea 13th September 1997 26,186 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 0-0 Arsenal 18th October 1997 26,180 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 0-3 Manchester United 27th April 1998 26,180 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 1-3 Tottenham Hotspur 28th March 1998 26,116 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 1-2 Newcastle United 29th November 1997 26,085 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 2-2 Southampton 7th May 2005 26,066 2004-2005
Crystal Palace 1-0 Liverpool FC 23rd April 2005 26,043 2004-2005

 

Intro

Crystal Palace’s first four Premier League campaigns ended with the same outcome in all of them – relegation from the top-flight. The Eagles have become a sterner and secure outfit since their latest promotion in 2013, although they are often a feature in the survival battle in most seasons. Their best campaign was a 10th place finish under Alan Pardew’s stewardship in 2014-2015 although Roy Hodgson’s achievement to keep them up last season from a position of no goals and no points after seven matches has to be considered extremely highly.

 

1992-1993

Founder members of the Premier League, Crystal Palace struggled to score goals throughout the season after selling Mark Bright in August to Sheffield Wednesday. Palace made a desperate start, winning just once (2-0 away at Everton) in their first 17 matches. However, a run of seven wins in their next 11 games took them closer to mid-table. However, although there were impressive home victories over relegation rivals Crystal Palace and Ipswich Town, the Eagles were relegated on the final day after a 3-0 defeat at Highbury against Arsenal, whilst Oldham beat Southampton 4-3. Steve Coppell resigned after relegation and was replaced by his assistant, Alan Smith.

 

1994-1995

After winning the First Division, Crystal Palace made an immediate return to the top-flight but made a nightmare start, as they were thrashed 6-1 at home by Liverpool FC on the opening day. Alan Smith signed Ray Wilkins to add experience to his midfield but he played just once for the club and left in November to take a managerial role at former club Queens Park Rangers. The Eagles made the semi-finals of both domestic cup competitions but scored just 34 times in 42 league matches which was the lowest tally in the Premier League. Despite the best efforts of Chris Armstrong, Chris Coleman and Gareth Southgate, Palace were relegated on the final day again – this time after failing to beat Newcastle United at St James’ Park.

 

1997-1998

Hopes were high for Crystal Palace’s third Premier League season after the exciting acquisition in pre-season of Italian Attilio Lombardo from Juventus. Lombardo’s experience saw the club become one of the best away sides in the division, spearheading them to outstanding victories away at Leeds United, Sheffield Wednesday and Tottenham Hotspur. In late November, they were 10th in the table. However, they didn’t win any of their next 16 matches and slipped back into relegation trouble. Not helped by constant rumours of a takeover by computer tycoon Mark Goldberg and a desperate home record with just two victories all term at Selhurst Park, the club were relegated again from the top-flight on 27th April after a 3-0 home defeat to Manchester United.

 

2004-2005

It was more final day heartache for the Eagles supporters in 2004-2005 as a 2-2 draw away at Charlton Athletic wasn’t enough to keep them in the top-flight because of West Brom’s home victory over Portsmouth. Iain Dowie’s side won just seven league games but did record notable home victories over Liverpool FC and Tottenham Hotspur, whilst Andy Johnson scored 21 goals as he finished runner-up to Thierry Henry in the race for the Golden Boot.

 

2013-2014

After an eight-year absence, Crystal Palace returned to the Premier League but made a terrible start, losing seven of their first eight matches. Following a 4-1 home loss by Fulham in October, Ian Holloway resigned and was replaced by Tony Pulis. Pulis immediately made the team harder to beat and the Eagles climbed away comfortably from danger to avoid relegation for the first time in their Premier League history. This included a five-match winning run in April as they finished a brilliant 11th.

 

2014-2015

Pre-season plans were thrown in total disarray when after disagreements over the direction of the club with owner Steve Parish, Tony Pulis abruptly resigned just two days before the campaign was due to start. Neil Warnock returned to the club as his successor but just three wins from 18 matches saw the Eagles in the bottom three at Christmas. After a 3-1 defeat to Southampton on Boxing Day, Warnock was the first managerial casualty of the campaign. Parish then pursued and successfully tempted Alan Pardew away from Newcastle United to return to his former club. Pardew galvanised the Eagles to a 10th place finish as they ended as one of the form teams in the second half of the campaign which included a 2-1 home win over champions Manchester City in April.

 

2015-2016

The excellent end to 2014-2015 continued in the first half of the 2015-2016 campaign. The likes of Yohan Cabaye arrived and Wilfried Zaha by now had returned on a permanent basis to his first club. Palace were sixth on New Years’ Day and only a few points off the top four positions. They also became only the second club to defeat Jose Mourinho at home in the Premier League when the Eagles won 2-1 early season at Stamford Bridge. However, a 3-0 reverse to the faltering champions in January started a nightmare run of form that dragged them into relegation danger.

Late season victories over Norwich City and Stoke City kept them safe but a 15th place finish was a major disappointment for everyone connected with the club. The saving grace was a run to the FA Cup final but despite taking the lead against Manchester United, they lost the showpiece event 2-1 after extra time.

 

2016-2017

Alan Pardew was a man under pressure going into 2016-2017 and despite breaking the club’s transfer record to sign Christian Benteke from Liverpool FC, he couldn’t revitalise the Eagles. Just four wins from 17 games and he was sacked just before Christmas and replaced by Sam Allardyce, who was available after his short reign as England boss. Allardyce did the job required, got Benteke scoring, tightened the backline up and wins over Chelsea, Arsenal and Liverpool FC in the last couple of months kept them once again in the Premier League. They finished 14th but Allardyce quit at the end of the season.

 

2017-2018

It was Frank de Boer who succeeded Allardyce but a lack of summer investment and no wins from their opening four matches saw him sacked in mid-September after just 10 weeks in the post. Roy Hodgson returned to his boyhood club but started with three successive defeats. After seven games, the club had no goals, no wins and no points but a 2-1 victory over champions Chelsea was the galvanising lift everyone needed. Crystal Palace remained in relegation trouble for much of the season but always looked like they would have enough in the playing squad, helped by Zaha’s best-ever season in the Premier League and 10 goals from midfielder Luka Milivojevic. In the end, they finished 11th and a 5-0 win at home to Leicester City at the end of April became the club’s biggest-ever Premier League victory.

 

2018-2019

Crystal Palace’s 113th season of existence began with an opening day 2-0 victory over Fulham at Craven Cottage. Hodgson’s side struggled to sustain any consistency in the first four months of the season but they are going in the right direction after wins in December over Burnley, Leicester City and more recently, a surprising and deserving 3-2 victory away at champions Manchester City, helped by a Goal of the Season contender from Andros Townsend.

The Clubs: Aston Villa

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
924 316 275 333 1117 1186 -69 1223 24

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Gareth Barry 365
Gabriel Agbonlahor 322
Alan Wright 260
Lee Hendrie 251
Steve Staunton 245
Ian Taylor 234
Olof Mellberg 232
Ugo Ehiogu 229
Gareth Southgate 190
Stiliyan Petrov 185

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Gabriel Agbonlahor 73
Dwight Yorke 60
Dion Dublin 48
Juan Pablo Angel 44
Christian Benteke 42
Gareth Barry 41
Julian Joachim 39
Dean Saunders 38
John Carew 37
Darius Vassell 35

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Aston Villa 7-1 Wimbledon 11th February 1995 1994-1995
Derby County 0-6 Aston Villa 12th April 2008 2007-2008
Aston Villa 6-1 Sunderland 29th April 2013 2012-2013
Aston Villa 5-0 Swindon Town 12th February 1994 1993-1994
Aston Villa 5-0 Wimbledon 22nd December 1996 1996-1997
Leicester City 0-5 Aston Villa 31st January 2004 2003-2004
Aston Villa 5-1 Middlesbrough 17th January 1993 1992-1993
Aston Villa 5-1 Birmingham City 20th April 2008 2007-2008
Aston Villa 5-1 Bolton Wanderers 7th November 2009 2009-2010
Aston Villa 4-0 Watford 5th February 2000 1999-2000

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Chelsea 8-0 Aston Villa 23rd December 2012 2012-2013
Chelsea 7-1 Aston Villa 27th March 2010 2009-2010
Newcastle United 6-0 Aston Villa 22nd August 2010 2010-2011
Aston Villa 0-6 Liverpool FC 14th February 2016 2015-2016
Southampton 6-1 Aston Villa 16th May 2015 2014-2015
Blackburn Rovers 5-0 Aston Villa 17th January 1998 1997-1998
Arsenal 5-0 Aston Villa 1st April 2006 2005-2006
Liverpool FC 5-0 Aston Villa 22nd March 2009 2008-2009
Manchester City 5-0 Aston Villa 17th November 2012 2012-2013
Arsenal 5-0 Aston Villa 1st February 2015 2014-2015

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Ron Atkinson 3 10th November 1994
Brian Little 4 24th February 1998
John Gregory 5 23rd January 2002
Graham Taylor 2 30th June 2003
David O’Leary 3 20th July 2006
Martin O’Neill 4 9th August 2010
Gerard Houllier 1 1st June 2011
Alex McLeish 1 14th May 2012
Paul Lambert 3 11th February 2015
Tim Sherwood 2 25th October 2015
Remi Garde 1 29th March 2016
Eric Black 1 3rd June 2016

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Aston Villa 2-0 Derby County 3rd November 2007 47,938 2007-2008
Aston Villa 2-1 Liverpool FC 7th May 1994 45,347 1993-1994
Aston Villa 0-1 Liverpool FC 29th December 2009 42,788 2009-2010
Aston Villa 1-1 Manchester United 10th February 2010 42,788 2009-2010
Aston Villa 1-0 Birmingham City 25th April 2010 42,788 2009-2010
Aston Villa 1-0 Liverpool FC 22nd May 2011 42,785 2010-2011
Aston Villa 0-3 Manchester United 15th December 2013 42,682 2013-2014
Aston Villa 1-2 Liverpool FC 11th August 2007 42,640 2007-2008
Aston Villa 1-4 Manchester United 20th October 2007 42,640 2007-2008
Aston Villa 4-1 Newcastle United 9th February 2008 42,640 2007-2008

 

Intro

Aston Villa were a Premier League ever-present until their relegation from the Premier League in 2016. Runners-up in the very first season, the Villans remain one of the leading clubs in English football. They enjoyed sustained top-six campaigns under the likes of Brian Little in the mid-1990s and throughout Martin O’Neill’s exciting reign. However, Randy Lerner’s determination to tighten the purse led to three managers, just three wins, mass protests inside Villa Park and the demise in 2015-2016 that was pretty sorry to witness. Villa are now in their third season in the Championship and desperate to return to the Premier League party, with former title-winning skipper John Terry now on the coaching staff as assistant manager to former Brentford boss, Dean Smith.

 

1992-1993

After only drawing their first three Premier League matches, manager Ron Atkinson added to his striking reinforcements with the acquisition of Dean Saunders from Liverpool FC. It was a great bit of business. Saunders struck up a great partnership with Dalian Atkinson, whose strike away at Wimbledon in October won the BBC Match of the Day Goal of the Season.

For much of the season, Villa were locked in a tight battle for the inaugural Premier League title along with Manchester United and Norwich City. Paul McGrath’s tremendous performances saw him crowned as the PFA Players’ Player of the Year. However, a 3-0 defeat at Ewood Park to Blackburn Rovers in mid-April handed the title initiative to Manchester United. A home loss to Oldham Athletic at the start of May finished off Villa’s title bid and they eventually finished 10 points shy of top spot. Nevertheless, their attractive brand of football had won them new fans and made them one of the neutral supporters’ favourite in this new era of English football.

 

1993-1994

Aston Villa’s second Premier League campaign was unremarkable. A modest 10th place finish was a disappointment after the previous season’s near-miss with the title. However, there was to be a silver lining to the campaign. In March, they defeated Manchester United 3-1 at Wembley Stadium to win the League Cup – therefore denying the Red Devils a shot at a unique domestic treble.

 

1994-1995

In a bid to improve league fortunes, Ron Atkinson signed John Fashanu in the summer from Wimbledon and with Saunders, Dalian Atkinson and Dwight Yorke all still around – goals looked set to be a guarantee. However, the squad was starting to age and a cataclysmic run of form saw Villa slip to 20th by mid-November. They threw away a match at Selhurst Park against Wimbledon, losing 4-3 after going 3-1 infront. Despite their dire position and having experienced a nine-game winless run, many were surprised to see Atkinson sacked by the ruthless Doug Ellis.

Ellis started his pursuit of former player Brian Little, who resigned from his position as Leicester City manager to force through his move into the Villa Park dugout. He won Manager of the Month honours in January and spearheaded the club to their biggest-ever Premier League victory with a 7-1 demolition of Wimbledon in mid-February. However, another desperate run saw them slip dangerously close to the bottom four and survival was only effectively secured by a Yorke double in their final home match of the season against Liverpool FC. 18th place was not where anyone expected the Villans to finish after a nightmare league season.

 

1995-1996

Brian Little’s first summer saw him bring in Mark Draper, Gareth Southgate and Savo Milosevic and Villa’s fortunes drastically improved. A 3-1 opening day victory over Manchester United set the tone for an encouraging campaign that saw the Villans rarely outside the top six. They even harboured outside hopes of the championship with an unbeaten home record until the end of January when Liverpool FC defeated them 2-0. Nevertheless, Villa finished an excellent fourth and won the League Cup for the second time in three years, overpowering Leeds United 3-0 in the final.

 

1996-1997

Aston Vila dropped from fourth to fifth in the table in 1996-1997 but it was another consistent and impressive season from Brian Little’s men. They destroyed Wimbledon’s 20+ match unbeaten run with a 5-0 trouncing of the Dons in December and also beat Liverpool FC at home 1-0. They secured qualification for the UEFA Cup on the final day of the season with a narrow success over Southampton.

 

1997-1998

The arrival of Stan Collymore for just over £7 million days after the previous season concluded suggested great hopes for Aston Villa in 1997-1998 but losing their first four matches quickly put out those high expectations. Brian Little resigned towards the end of February after a defeat at Wimbledon that left Villa in a disappointing 14th position in the table. His former coach, John Gregory, returned to the club and they recovered brilliantly. Despite disappointing home defeats to the relegated duo of Barnsley and Bolton Wanderers, Villa’s rapid rise to seventh place at the season’s end meant another season of European football for the supporters to look forward to.

 

1998-1999

Gregory was unhappy with Dwight Yorke after the Villans’ superstar forced through a transfer to Manchester United four days into the season. Nevertheless, he spent the Yorke money wisely on the likes of Paul Merson, Steve Watson and in November, Dion Dublin from Midlands’ rivals, Coventry City. Villa set a club-record run of 12 games unbeaten at the start of the season and in December, produced one of the comebacks of the season to defeat champions Arsenal 3-2, having trailed 2-0 at half-time.

They topped the table on Christmas Day and were in a four-way scrap for the title going into the New Year alongside Chelsea, Manchester United and Arsenal. However, Stan Collymore was sidelined for much of the second half of the season because of stress, the goals dried up for Merson and Dublin and an FA Cup defeat at home to First Division Fulham sparked a dramatic collapse in form. Aston Villa won just three league games in the second half of the campaign and faded badly to sixth position, missing out on the UEFA Intertoto Cup position to West Ham United in the process. It was a campaign that promised so much but ultimately, delivered so little.

 

1999-2000

John Gregory’s second full season in the dugout began poorly as the lack of confidence around the team remained. Dublin sustained a nasty neck injury in December that kept him out of action for several months and away form especially was a major concern. They improved after Christmas to finish in sixth position and also reached the FA Cup final, losing 1-0 to Chelsea in the final-ever FA Cup event to be played underneath Wembley’ famed ‘Twin Towers.’

 

2000-2001

Aston Villa’s 2000-2001 campaign was unremarkable to say the least. They finished in eighth place and made little impact on the season’s proceedings. 15 draws ensured they wouldn’t finish any higher in the table whilst main summer signing Luc Nilis suffered a serious injury playing against Ipswich Town in September that cost the Belgian his playing career.

 

2001-2002

Moroccan Internationals Mustapha Hadji and Hassan Kachloul were added to the squad in pre-season and Peter Schmeichel also returned to the Premier League after his spell in Portugal with Sporting Lisbon. Villa made a bright start and Schmeichel became the first-ever goalkeeper to score in the Premier League with his late effort in defeat at Everton. They went top of the table at the end of October but followed this high with a run of just one win in 11 matches.

By now, John Gregory had grown tired of his tempestuous relationship with Doug Ellis and resigned in late January, freeing himself up to take up the vacancy at former club Derby County. 12 years after guiding the club to a second-place finish in the old First Division, Graham Taylor returned to have another go at working with Ellis. He oversaw two late season victories over Southampton and Chelsea to ensure another eighth place finish in the table and therefore, a seventh successive campaign inside the Premier League’s top 10.

 

2002-2003

One goal only and three defeats in the opening four matches set the tone for a disappointing 2002-2003 season for Graham Taylor and Aston Villa. There were two damaging defeats to Second City rivals Birmingham City, who finished above them in the table for good measure. The second defeat at Villa Park saw a goalkeeping error and two daft red cards for Dion Dublin and Joey Gudjonsson. The usually restrained Taylor refused to take any questions afterwards from the media after this debacle.

Survival was only guaranteed on the penultimate weekend of the season and the 16th place finish that followed was enough for Ellis to dismiss Taylor at the end of the campaign.

 

2003-2004

After a season on the sidelines, David O’Leary returned to management and guided Aston Villa back into the Premier League’s top six. He made a slow start, winning just two of his first 13 league games which left the club in the bottom three in early December after a 4-0 drubbing at Old Trafford to Manchester United. Form improved dramatically after that result, losing just two of their next nine games to get the club into the European reckoning. O’Leary’s side reached the semi-finals of the League Cup and finished just five points shy of the UEFA Champions League qualification places – although the cup heroics of Middlesbrough and Millwall meant this was one of the rare seasons where sixth place wasn’t enough to secure European football for the following season.

 

2004-2005

There were few highs in 2004-2005 for Aston Villa supporters as the team failed to build on the previous season’s sixth place finish. Villa dropped to 10th and lost both games again to bitter rivals Birmingham City to ensure they remained winless in six meetings against the Blues since their promotion to the top-flight.

There was a 3-0 victory at St James’ Park and a comeback victory at Southampton from 2-0 down at half-time to a 3-2 success but it was a mediocre season at best for the Villa faithful.

 

2005-2006

Milan Baros arrived from Liverpool FC in a bid to improve Aston Villa’s goalscoring potential but the Czech only showed fleeting glimpses of his quality and for much of the season, Villa lagged at the wrong end of the table. Any relegation fears were ended by a 3-1 victory over Birmingham City where Baros scored twice and youngster Gary Cahill scored his first senior goal with a spectacular overhead kick.

In total, Villa only recorded 10 league victories, although there were two 4-0 triumphs over Everton and Middlesbrough respectively. They finished a dismal 16th, and just eight points clear of danger. With Doug Ellis set to sell the club, O’Leary left his role as manager at the end of the campaign after three seasons at the helm.

 

2006-2007

Martin O’Neill was installed as the new manager in the off-season and in late August, American businessman Randy Lerner completed his takeover of the club. Villa were the last team in the Premier League to taste defeat, staying undefeated until a 3-1 loss at Liverpool FC at the end of October. An 11-match winless sequence in the winter months had some fans nervous but O’Neill was stabilising the club for a more sustained European push in the seasons to come. This was highlighted further by the January additions of John Carew and Ashley Young. They finished 11th, having drawn a staggering 17 of their 38 league matches.

 

2007-2008

Aston Villa improved five positions on their 2006-2007 finish, returning to the top six and earning UEFA Cup football for the following season. John Carew and Gabby Agbonlahor scored 24 goals between them in a dangerous attacking partnership and O’Neill’s side played some great attacking football throughout the season. This included a 6-0 victory away at hapless Derby County in April which remains the club’s biggest-ever away victory in the Premier League.

 

2008-2009

For the second successive season, Aston Villa finished in sixth position, although there was a sense of disappointment at the end of it. The Villans launched a serious challenge to Arsenal in the race for a top four position and at one point, held a seven-point advantage over the Gunners, spearheaded by a tremendous sequence of away victories which broke a long-standing club record. A 2-2 draw at home to newly-promoted Stoke City though began a calamitous run which saw them win just one of their next 10 games, puncturing their ambitions of reaching the UEFA Champions League qualifiers.

 

2009-2010

For the first time in 12 years, Aston Villa began a campaign without Gareth Barry after his summer departure to Manchester City. They didn’t miss him too much in the early part of the season despite an opening day defeat at home to Wigan Athletic. Villa won at Anfield and Old Trafford and defeated eventual champions Chelsea 2-1 in October too.

O’Neill’s side were always in the four-way tussle for a top four finish and although they amassed two more points than the previous campaign, they finished sixth again with Tottenham Hotspur taking the coveted fourth spot. James Milner’s excellent displays saw him awarded with the PFA Young Player of the Year award and there was also a return to the League Cup final after a 14-year absence. However, it ended in heartbreak with a 2-1 defeat at Wembley to Manchester United.

 

2010-2011

This was the first season where Randy Lerner started to tighten the purse strings at Aston Villa and after a disagreement over the future transfer policy of the club; Martin O’Neill abruptly resigned as manager just five days before the season got underway. Two weeks later, James Milner was sold to Manchester City.

After serving notice as technical director of the French Football Federation, Gerard Houllier took charge towards the end of September but he struggled to sustain any consistency, both in terms of results and performances. He didn’t see out the season either. Ill health meant it was his no.2 Gary McAllister who took charge of the last few games of the season. Victories over Arsenal and Liverpool FC took the club to ninth place but it was the beginning of a worrying decline for the supporters.

 

2011-2012

With Houllier being forced to step down, it was Alex McLeish who succeeded him. Having been boss of Birmingham City before taking over at Villa Park, he was not a popular choice and although he stayed unbeaten until mid-October in the Premier League, the style of football was absolutely awful. Aston Villa amassed just 38 points all season, recorded only seven victories and collected just 19 points at home which at that point, was their worst-ever home campaign in their top-flight history.

Club captain Stiliyan Petrov was diagnosed with acute leukaemia towards the end of March and after a final day defeat to Norwich City, McLeish became the third Aston Villa manager in their Premier League history to finish 16th and receive his marching orders.

 

2012-2013

Paul Lambert was the new manager at the helm for the 2012-2013 season after guiding Norwich City to a 12th place finish in his first top-flight management campaign. The Scot found the going extremely tough in his new job as Aston Villa collected just a single point from his opening three games in-charge. There was a fabulous 3-1 victory at Anfield over Liverpool FC but just a week later, Villa caved in spectacularly at Chelsea to lose 8-0.

Further embarrassment followed in January with a League Cup semi-final defeat over two legs to fourth-tier outfit Bradford City and it was only the goals of new signing Christian Benteke that just about kept Villa above the bottom three. Benteke finished with 20+ goals to become the first player in the club’s Premier League history to achieve that feat since Dwight Yorke. Aston Villa finished a rocky campaign in 15th position.

 

2013-2014

For the second season running, Aston Villa finished in 15th position and endured another stale campaign under the guidance of Paul Lambert. There were few remarkable highlights, other than a 3-1 victory on the opening weekend over Arsenal at The Emirates Stadium and an early season 3-2 triumph over eventual title winners, Manchester City. At the end of a stale season, Randy Lerner confirmed he had put the club up for sale but he would find no interested buyer ultimately to take the club off his hands.

 

2014-2015

Three wins from the club’s first four matches including a 1-0 success at Anfield hinted at potentially a better season for Aston Villa but they followed this up with a run of six successive defeats, failing to score in five of these matches. Goalscoring was a huge problem all season and after a 2-0 loss to Hull City in mid-February that saw the club slip to 19th position, Paul Lambert was sacked and replaced by Tim Sherwood.

Sherwood managed to galvanise the team and especially, Christian Benteke, who rediscovered his scoring form under his management. This included a hat-trick against Queens Park Rangers and a winning goal at White Hart Lane. There was a late season 6-1 beating at Southampton but other results ensured their safety, although they finished just one place above the drop zone. Sherwood’s impact also saw Aston Villa reach the FA Cup final, although this ended in a 4-0 defeat to holders Arsenal.

 

2015-2016

For the second season running, Aston Villa won their first match of the season away from home. Rudy Gestede’s header meant they were the party poopers at AFC Bournemouth, inflicting defeat on the Cherries on their Premier League bow. However, it would be the only win they amassed in the first half of a nightmare season. By the turn of the New Year, they were 11 points adrift of safety.

Tim Sherwood was sacked towards the end of October following a run of six consecutive defeats which began with a collapse at Leicester City, throwing away a 2-0 lead to lose 3-2 to the fearless Foxes. Remi Garde was drafted in as manager and stopped the rot with a gutsy goalless draw at home to Manchester City. However, the Frenchman looked completely out of his depth. This was never more evident when on Valentine Day’s 2016; they suffered their worst home defeat since 1935 after losing 6-0 at home to Liverpool FC.

Garde eventually parted ways with the club at the end of March and Villa’s final days in the Premier League were greeted with mass demonstrations, banners and protests calling for owner Randy Lerner to step down. Eric Black took charge on an interim basis until the end of the season and relegation was finally confirmed with a 1-0 loss in mid-April away at Manchester United. Villa’s final tally of three wins and just 17 points means this is the third worst campaign ever seen by a team in Premier League history.

The Clubs: Bradford City

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
76 14 20 42 68 138 -70 62 2

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Stuart McCall 71
Dean Windass 62
David Wetherall 56
Andy O’Brien 54
Peter Beagrie 52
Gunnar Halle 51
Robbie Blake 50
Wayne Jacobs 45
Dean Saunders 44
Jamie Lawrence 39

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Dean Windass 13
Peter Beagrie 8
Robbie Blake 6
Benito Carbone 5
Lee Mills 5
Jamie Lawrence 4
Ashley Ward 4
Eoin Jess 3
Dean Saunders 3
David Wetherall 3

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Bradford City 3-0 Wimbledon 30th April 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 3-1 Leicester City 23rd October 1999 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-0 Newcastle United 18th December 1999 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-0 Chelsea 22nd August 2000 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Charlton Athletic 13th April 2001 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Derby County 21st April 2001 2000-2001
Bradford City 3-2 Watford 22nd January 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-1 Arsenal 5th February 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 2-1 Coventry City 2nd December 2000 2000-2001
Leicester City 1-2 Bradford City 1st January 2001 2000-2001

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 6-0 Bradford City 5th September 2000 2000-2001
Leeds United 6-1 Bradford City 13th May 2001 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-4 Sunderland 2nd October 1999 1999-2000
Manchester United 4-0 Bradford City 26th December 1999 1999-2000
Coventry City 4-0 Bradford City 18th March 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 0-4 Manchester United 25th March 2000 1999-2000
Everton 4-0 Bradford City 15th April 2000 1999-2000
Bradford City 1-4 Sunderland 26th December 2000 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-3 West Ham United 28th August 1999 1999-2000
Leicester City 3-0 Bradford City 6th May 2000 1999-2000

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Paul Jewell 1 18th June 2000
Chris Hutchings 1 6th November 2000
Jim Jefferies 1 24th December 2001

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Bradford City 0-2 Liverpool FC 1st May 2001 22,057 2000-2001
Bradford City 1-1 Middlesbrough 5th May 2001 20,921 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-3 Manchester United 13th January 2001 20,551 2000-2001
Bradford City 1-2 West Ham United 24th February 2001 20,469 2000-2001
Bradford City 1-4 Sunderland 26th December 2000 20,370 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-2 Newcastle United 31st March 2001 20,160 2000-2001
Bradford City 0-3 Aston Villa 3rd February 2001 19,591 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-2 Manchester City 17th March 2001 19,117 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Derby County 21st April 2001 18,564 2000-2001
Bradford City 2-0 Newcastle United 18th December 1999 18,286 2000-2001

 

Intro

Bradford City were one of the more unlikely clubs to reach the Premier League when Paul Jewell guided them to promotion in May 1999. The Bantams were tipped by many to go straight back down but a final day victory over Liverpool FC ensured survival for a second top-flight campaign. A messy 2000-2001 season saw relegation follow and the club have experienced tough times since, including a spell in the fourth-tier of English football and administration but they did reach the League Cup final against the odds in 2012-2013.

 

1999-2000

Bradford made a wonderful start to their maiden Premier League campaign as Dean Saunders’ late winner saw them defeat Middlesbrough on the opening day of the season at The Riverside Stadium. They were gifted another away victory a month later at Derby County by a Horacio Carbonari own goal but they managed just two more victories before Christmas. As anticipated, Bradford spent most of the season at the wrong end of the table and also lost a thrilling contest at West Ham 5-4, despite leading 4-2 at one point. However, they unexpectedly beat Arsenal and three wins from their last four games saw them edge out Wimbledon and maintain their place in the top-flight.

Dean Windass finished as top goalscorer, having also netted in the win over the Gunners and David Wetherall’s header beat Liverpool FC at Valley Parade on the last day to create unbridled joy at the ground. The win was tempered a month later when Paul Jewell walked out on the club to take charge of relegated Sheffield Wednesday.

 

2000-2001

It was Jewell’s assistant, Chris Hutchings who would take charge of the club in 2000-2001 and they spent money to bring in the likes of Benito Carbone, Dan Petrescu and David Hopkin to the club. They beat Chelsea 2-0 in their first home match of the season but that would be the only victory Hutchings would experience as manager.

He was sacked after a 2-0 defeat to Charlton Athletic in early November and replaced permanently by Jim Jefferies, who moved down from Scottish football. Bradford had dropped into the bottom three in mid-September and they would not escape the drop zone again for the remainder of the season. Jefferies only oversaw four victories in his 24 matches’ in-charge and their relegation was confirmed after defeat to Everton on 28th April.

He wasn’t helped by the departure during the season of Andy O’Brien to Newcastle United, Hopkin back to Crystal Palace and Dean Windass to Middlesbrough.

The Clubs: Ipswich Town

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
202 57 53 92 219 312 -93 224 5

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
David Linighan 112
Geraint Williams 109
John Wark 101
Mick Stockwell 96
Chris Kiwomya 91
Matt Holland 76
Craig Forrest 74
Hermann Hreidarsson 74
Phil Whelan 74
Gavin Johnson 73

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Marcus Stewart 25
Chris Kiwomya 18
Ian Marshall 13
John Wark 13
Alun Armstrong 11
Marcus Bent 9
Jason Dozzell 7
Martijn Reuser 7
Finidi George 6
Bontcho Guentchev 6

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Ipswich Town 5-0 Sunderland 29th December 2001 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 4-1 Leicester City 2nd January 1995 1994-1995
Oldham Athletic 0-3 Ipswich Town 14th August 1993 1993-1994
Everton 0-3 Ipswich Town 30th September 2000 2000-2001
Ipswich Town 3-0 Tottenham Hotspur 30th December 2000 2000-2001
Southampton 0-3 Ipswich Town 2nd April 2001 2000-2001
Ipswich Town 4-2 Leeds United 3rd October 1992 1992-1993
Ipswich Town 3-1 Manchester City 12th December 1992 1992-1993
Ipswich Town 3-1 Norwich City 19th April 1993 1992-1993
Ipswich Town 3-1 Southampton 16th December 2000 2000-2001

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 9-0 Ipswich Town 4th March 1995 1994-1995
Ipswich Town 0-6 Liverpool FC 9th February 2002 2001-2002
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 Ipswich Town 23rd April 1994 1993-1994
Liverpool FC 5-0 Ipswich Town 11th May 2002 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-5 Arsenal 5th March 1994 1993-1994
Arsenal 4-0 Ipswich Town 11th September 1993 1993-1994
Leeds United 4-0 Ipswich Town 5th April 1995 1994-1995
Manchester United 4-0 Ipswich Town 22nd September 2001 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-4 Sheffield Wednesday 6th November 1993 1993-1994
Nottingham Forest 4-1 Ipswich Town 10th December 1994 1994-1995

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
John Lyall 3 5th December 1994
George Burley 3 11th October 2002

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Ipswich Town 0-1 Manchester United 27th April 2002 28,433 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 0-0 Chelsea 1st April 2002 28,053 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-0 Middlesbrough 24th April 2002 25,979 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 0-6 Liverpool FC 9th February 2002 25,608 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-3 Southampton 2nd March 2002 25,440 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 0-0 Aston Villa 23rd March 2002 25,247 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 1-0 Fulham 30th January 2002 25,156 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 2-1 Tottenham Hotspur 12th January 2002 25,077 2001-2002
Ipswich Town 2-1 Manchester City 7th May 2001 25,004 2000-2001
Ipswich Town 0-1 Newcastle United 9th December 2001 24,748 2001-2002

Intro

Ipswich Town were the last champions of the old Second Division before the formation of the FA Premier League in 1992. The Tractor Boys were a side who might have lacked world-class players but had an abundance of team spirit. This meant they ensured top-flight football remained at Portman Road until 1995. They returned to the Premier League in 2000 for a two-season spell which saw them record a fine fifth-place finish in 2000-2001 before a crushing relegation just one season later.

1992-1993

Ipswich’s reward for winning the Second Division title in 1992-1993 was a place in the inaugural Premier League season. They made an impressive start, staying unbeaten in their first eight matches, even though six of those games ended in draws. By January, they sat as high as fourth in the table and even defeated Manchester United 2-1 at Portman Road.

However, the win over the Red Devils was their last successin 13 and saw the club plummet to 17th in the table. A crucial 3-1victory over East Anglia rivals Norwich City in April with Jason Dozzellscoring twice helped Ipswich achieve their aim of survival, just three pointsclear of the drop zone.

1993-1994

Ipswich dealt with the blow of selling Jason Dozzell to Tottenham Hotspur in the summer initially very well and new signing Ian Marshall made a great start. The summer arrival from Oldham Athletic scored in his first three games as Ipswich recorded victories over the Latics, Southampton and Chelsea, without conceding a goal.

In November, they held Manchester United to a goalless draw at Old Trafford and by New Year’s Day, they sat in the top half, having lost only six of their first 22 games. However, there was little joy in 1994. John Lyall’s team recorded just two further victories and slipped into the relegation battle. On the final day of the season, they managed a goalless draw at Ewood Park against Blackburn Rovers.

However, they would have been relegated but for a late Mark Stein goal at Stamford Bridge which ensured Sheffield United lost at Chelsea and meant they went down rather than Ipswich.

1994-1995

After avoiding relegation by the skin of their teeth on the final day of the 1993-1994 season, Ipswich’s luck ran out this season. Although there were early season victories over Queens Park Rangers and Manchester United, Ipswich weren’t able to sustain any consistent form. They were in the bottom four from October onwards and two months later, manager John Lyall resigned as first-team boss.

Former full-back George Burley, who had played a big part in the successful era the club enjoyed during Sir Bobby Robson’s spell, returned to the club as manager. Ipswich did record a surprising 1-0 victory at Anfield over Liverpool FC in mid-January but survival was virtually impossible. In March, they fell victim to a 9-0 beating at Old Trafford against Manchester United which remains the biggest-ever defeat in Premier League history.

Relegation was confirmed over the Easter weekend and Ipswich ultimately finished bottom of the 22-team table, conceding 93 goals and recording just seven league victories.

2000-2001

After an absence of five seasons, Ipswich finally returned to the top-flight as play-off winners in 2000 and they spectacularly surpassed expectations. Considered as one of the pre-season favourites for the drop, Ipswich defied the critics time and again. They lost just three home matches all season and never relinquished a position inside the top six after a 2-0 victory away at Bradford City in late October.

A 3-1 home victory over the Bantams in early March took Ipswich into the dizzy heights of third position and it was a spot they held for over seven weeks. Marcus Stewart was a revelation and his 19 goals meant he finished runner-up in the race for the Golden Boot.

Ultimately, the experience of Liverpool FC and Leeds United wore down Ipswich and a 2-1 defeat to Charlton Athletic meant Ipswich were squeezed into fifth spot at the season’s end. Nevertheless, they spectacularly exceeded expectations, earning UEFA Cup football for the first time since 1982 and George Burley’s achievements meant he deservedly won the LMA Manager of the Year award.

2001-2002

£8 million was spent on new players in the summer of 2001 with the likes of Finidi George and Matteo Sereni arriving at the club. However, Ipswich were about to fall victim to the curse of “second season syndrome.” A 3-1 victory over Derby County on the 21st August was their only win in their first 18 games and left them rooted to the bottom of the Premier League table. Not even a 1-0 victory over Inter Milan in the UEFA Cup could lift the gloom around Portman Road.

Winter looked bleak but Ipswich then hit a purple patch. A late win at White Hart Lane over Tottenham Hotspur just days before Christmas started a glorious run of seven wins in eight games. This included a 5-0 drubbing of Sunderland which remains the club’s biggest-ever Premier League victory.

Ipswich were upto 12th and at this point, a mid-table finish looked a real possibility. However, a soul-destroying 6-0 home beating by Liverpool FC knocked the stuffing out of the team. Ipswich recorded just one victory from their last 12 matches and six more points following the defeat by the Merseysiders. They arrived at Anfield on the last day needing a win to stand any chance of survival. That never looked likely and a 5-0 defeat ultimately consigned them to relegation.

George Burley resigned five months later and Ipswich have rarely looked like escaping the Championship since. Paul Lambert has just been appointed manager but he’ll have a job on his hands to keep Ipswich in the second-tier of English football.

The Clubs: Portsmouth

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
266 79 65 122 292 380 -88 293 7

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Matt Taylor 144
David James 134
Richard Hughes 114
Linvoy Primus 113
Dejan Stefanovic 112
Sean Davis 102
Kanu 102
Gary O’Neil 101
Sol Campbell 95
Lomana Lualua 87

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Yakubu 29
Benjani 19
Lomana Lualua 19
Kanu 17
Jermain Defoe 16
Matt Taylor 16
Gary O’Neil 11
Peter Crouch 10
Niko Kranjcar 9
Teddy Sheringham 9

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Portsmouth 6-1 Leeds United 8th November 2003 2003-2004
Portsmouth 5-1 Middlesbrough 15th May 2004 2003-2004
Portsmouth 4-0 Bolton Wanderers 26th August 2003 2003-2004
Middlesbrough 0-4 Portsmouth 28th August 2006 2006-2007
Portsmouth 4-0 Wigan Athletic 31st October 2009 2009-2010
Portsmouth 7-4 Reading 29th September 2007 2007-2008
Portsmouth 4-1 Southampton 23rd April 2005 2004-2005
Sunderland 1-4 Portsmouth 29th October 2005 2005-2006
Newcastle United 1-4 Portsmouth 3rd November 2007 2007-2008
Portsmouth 3-0 Blackburn Rovers 19th August 2006 2006-2007

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester City 6-0 Portsmouth 21st September 2008 2008-2009
Birmingham City 5-0 Portsmouth 21st January 2006 2005-2006
Manchester United 5-0 Portsmouth 6th February 2010 2009-2010
Portsmouth 0-5 Chelsea 24th March 2010 2009-2010
Arsenal 4-0 Portsmouth 28th December 2005 2005-2006
Chelsea 4-0 Portsmouth 17th August 2008 2008-2009
Liverpool FC 4-1 Portsmouth 22nd December 2007 2007-2008
Portsmouth 1-4 West Ham United 26th December 2008 2008-2009
Arsenal 4-1 Portsmouth 22nd August 2009 2009-2010
Portsmouth 1-4 Manchester United 28th November 2009 2009-2010

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Harry Redknapp 2 24th November 2004
Velimir Zajec 1 10th October 2005
Alain Perrin 2 24th November 2005
Harry Redknapp 4 25th October 2008
Tony Adams 1 9th February 2009
Paul Hart 2 24th November 2009
Avram Grant 1 30th June 2010

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Portsmouth 1-2 Tottenham Hotspur 17th October 2009 20,821 2009-2010
Portsmouth 0-0 Arsenal 26th December 2007 20,556 2007-2008
Portsmouth 0-1 Manchester United 25th August 2008 20,540 2008-2009
Portsmouth 2-0 Liverpool FC 19th December 2009 20,534 2009-2010
Portsmouth 0-1 Fulham 11th May 2008 20,532 2007-2008
Portsmouth 0-0 West Ham United 27th October 2007 20,525 2007-2008
Portsmouth 2-3 Liverpool FC 7th February 2009 20,524 2008-2009
Portsmouth 0-1 Tottenham Hotspur 15th December 2007 20,520 2007-2008
Portsmouth 1-1 Manchester United 15th August 2007 20,510 2007-2008
Portsmouth 0-0 Newcastle United 12th April 2008 20,507 2007-2008

 

Intro

Portsmouth made their Premier League debut in 2004 and were one of the most successful clubs to achieve consistency in the top 10 of the top-flight after promotion. That was during the second of Harry Redknapp’s managerial spells at the club which culminated in FA Cup success in 2008. However, Pompey were piling up the debt and when Redknapp left for Tottenham Hotspur in October 2008, everything started to spiral out of control. In February 2010, they became the first Premier League club to enter voluntarily administration, earning a nine-point deduction and guaranteeing relegation. Another administration has followed since and a demise to League Two but recent signs are that the Fratton Park club are on their way back up the league pyramid.

 

2003-2004

Portsmouth made their Premier League bow in 2003-2004 and under the guidance of the experienced Harry Redknapp, they made a brilliant start. They collected nine points from their first five matches, including a 1-1 draw at Highbury with Arsenal and a 4-0 trouncing of Bolton Wanderers which took them briefly to the top of the table. A crippling injury list and woeful away form sent them spiralling down the table but Yakubu’s winner in March’s South Coast Derby against Southampton spearheaded a wonderful run. Portsmouth secured safety in early May and finished a creditable 13th, ahead of the likes of Blackburn Rovers, Manchester City and Everton in the final standings.

 

2004-2005

Early season form in 2004-2005 included a home win over Manchester United and earned Redknapp October’s Manager of the Month award. However, things were not rosy between Harry and chairman Milan Mandaric. Mandaric’s decision to bring in a Director of Football in Velimir Zajec saw Redknapp decide to walk out on the club and turn up at South Coast rivals Southampton a fortnight later.

Zajec took over until early April, when Frenchman Alain Perrin was confirmed as permanent manager. A joyous 4-1 victory over Southampton on Redknapp’s first return to Fratton Park not only secured Portsmouth’s survival but provided an afternoon the home supporters would not forget.

 

2005-2006

After just four league victories from 20 games, Alain Perrin was sacked in November by Mandaric. Mandaric then patched things up with Redknapp, who was on the lookout to return after his Southampton experience had turned sour. He returned in early December with the club in real danger of losing its Premier League status and that looked very likely when they slipped seven points adrift of safety in early March.

However, two cracking goals from Pedro Mendes in a 2-1 home victory over Manchester City sparked another amazing run of form that saw the club lose only two of their last nine matches. Survival was secured by a comeback victory on the penultimate weekend of the season at Wigan Athletic. Redknapp would later say this was one of his “best achievements” in football.

 

2006-2007

In September 2006, Milan Mandaric left Portsmouth and Alexandre Gaydamak took over as owner of the club. He provided Redknapp with extra transfer funds and experience arrived at the club with the likes of Sol Campbell and David James among the new arrivals. Portsmouth topped the table in mid-September and finished ninth to record their highest top-flight finish since the 1950s. They only missed out on UEFA Cup qualification on the final day of the season after a goalless draw with Arsenal.

 

2007-2008

In October 2007, Redknapp signed an extended contract as manager and Portsmouth were becoming a very attractive side to watch. This was highlighted by both the amazing 7-4 victory over Reading and the arrival of Jermain Defoe in the January transfer window from Tottenham Hotspur. Portsmouth improved on their ninth-place finish of the previous season to finish eighth this time around. However, it was their FA Cup run that made the headlines.

A quarter-final victory over eventual league champions Manchester United was the highlight of a run that took Portsmouth to the final. Kanu scored the only goal of the game against Championship outfit Cardiff City in the showpiece event at Wembley Stadium to earn Portsmouth the 2008 FA Cup. Redknapp became the last English manager to win a major trophy to the present day.

 

2008-2009

The FA Cup victory took Portsmouth into European competition as they competed in the UEFA Cup and the highlight of their run was a 2-2 draw with the mighty AC Milan, although they did lead 2-0 in the contest.

However, the club was rocked by Harry Redknapp’s sudden departure towards the end of October to fill the vacancy at Tottenham Hotspur. Redknapp’s assistant, Tony Adams took charge but he was sacked in February after a run of just two victories in 16 games. Youth team coach Paul Hart was upgraded to the managerial role and he guided Portsmouth to safety as they finished in 14th place.

 

2009-2010

In late May 2009, Alexandre Gaydamak sold the club to Sulaiman Al Fahim, who had previously come to prominence by fronting the takeover of Manchester City. There was concern over Portsmouth’s finances with the summer departures of Glen Johnson, Peter Crouch, Sylvain Distin and Niko Kranjcar for vast sums of money.

In early October, the club admitted the players had not been paid and by now, Portsmouth’s financial situation was serious. Al Fahim sold the club to Ali al-Faraj and the club was now a mess. Performances on-the-pitch weren’t great either. Portsmouth lost their first seven matches and a 1-0 defeat at Stoke City in late November saw Hart’s tenure as manager come to an end. He was replaced by Avram Grant and although form did improve, Portsmouth were fighting a losing battle on two fronts.

Approximately £135 million in debt, the club went into voluntarily administration in February to avoid a winding-up order. This meant a nine-point deduction which virtually confirmed their relegation from the top-flight. A run to the FA Cup final where they lost to Chelsea did offer some light relief for the long-suffering supporters but it was a season where Portsmouth’s financial ruin had taken the club to the brink of extinction.

They are now in League One and setting the pace at 1/3 distance. The club seem to be on their way back, now owned by Michael Eisner, former chairman of The Walt Disney Company.

The Clubs: Middlesbrough

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
574 165 169 240 648 794 -146 661 14

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Mark Schwarzer 332
Stewart Downing 211
Robbie Mustoe 197
George Boateng 181
Gareth Southgate 160
Colin Cooper 159
Steve Vickers 155
Franck Queudrue 150
Curtis Fleming 146
Ugo Ehiogu 126

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Juninho 30
Hamilton Ricard 30
Mark Viduka 26
Yakubu 24
Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 23
Szilard Nemeth 23
Alen Boksic 22
Brian Deane 18
Stewart Downing 18
Massimo Maccarone 18

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Middlesbrough 8-1 Manchester City 11th May 2008 2007-2008
Middlesbrough 6-1 Derby County 5th March 1997 1996-1997
Middlesbrough 5-1 Derby County 3rd November 2001 2001-2002
Middlesbrough 5-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd May 2003 2002-2003
Middlesbrough 5-1 Bolton Wanderers 20th January 2007 2006-2007
Middlesbrough 4-0 Coventry City 7th September 1996 1996-1997
Middlesbrough 4-0 Sheffield Wednesday 3rd October 1998 1998-1999
Middlesbrough 4-0 Derby County 13th January 2001 2000-2001
Blackburn Rovers 0-4 Middlesbrough 16th October 2004 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 4-0 West Bromwich Albion 23rd April 2005 2004-2005

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 7-0 Middlesbrough 14th January 2006 2005-2006
Middlesbrough 1-6 Arsenal 24th April 1999 1998-1999
Chelsea 5-0 Middlesbrough 5th February 1996 1995-1996
Everton 5-0 Middlesbrough 17th February 1999 1998-1999
Middlesbrough 0-5 Chelsea 18th October 2008 2008-2009
Aston Villa 5-1 Middlesbrough 17th January 1993 1992-1993
Liverpool FC 5-1 Middlesbrough 14th December 1996 1996-1997
Arsenal 5-1 Middlesbrough 20th November 1999 1999-2000
Portsmouth 5-1 Middlesbrough 15th May 2004 2003-2004
Chelsea 4-0 Middlesbrough 3rd April 1993 1992-1993

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Lennie Lawrence 1 19th May 1994
Bryan Robson 5 6th December 2000
Terry Venables 1 12th June 2001
Steve McClaren 5 11th May 2006
Gareth Southgate 3 20th October 2009
Aitor Karanka 1 16th March 2017
Steve Agnew 1 9th June 2017

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Middlesbrough 0-0 Liverpool FC 22nd November 2003 35,100 2003-2004
Middlesbrough 2-0 Norwich City 28th December 2004 34,836 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 1-0 Newcastle United 5th March 2003 34,814 2002-2003
Middlesbrough 0-0 Leeds United 26th February 2000 34,800 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 1-1 Sunderland 6th November 1999 34,793 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 1-0 Liverpool FC 21st August 1999 34,783 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 3-4 Manchester United 10th April 2000 34,775 1999-2000
Middlesbrough 1-0 Tottenham Hotspur 7th May 2005 34,766 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 2-0 Liverpool FC 20th November 2004 34,751 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 1-0 Liverpool FC 9th November 2002 34,747 2002-2003

 

Intro

Middlesbrough have featured in 14 Premier League seasons and have often been an entertaining side. Their debut season was at Ayresome Park which ended with relegation but moving into The Riverside Stadium in August 1995 gave them the platform to become a regular mid-table team. A controversial relegation in 1997 did set them back but Boro bounced back quickly and remained in the elite until 2009. The fans have had the likes of Juninho, Fabrizio Ravanelli, Gazika Mendieta and Yakubu to enjoy during the Premier League Years.

 

1992-1993

Middlesbrough had won promotion in the previous season to become among the 22 founder members of the Premier League. They started well, winning four of their first seven games including a 4-1 victory over reigning champions Leeds United. A 1-0 loss to Crystal Palace just before the New Year though saw the club go into freefall from a mid-table position. They won just three matches after the turn of the year, collecting a meagre 10 points from 54. They were relegated on the penultimate weekend and finished second-bottom, five points adrift of safety.

 

1995-1996

This was a record-breaking season for Middlesbrough off-the-pitch. They moved into their new state-of-the-art Riverside Stadium and beat Chelsea in their first match at the ground in August 1995. Two months later, player-manager Bryan Robson managed to persuade the Brazilian Footballer of the Year Juninho to join the club which briefly turned the town into scenes that matched the colourful Rio carnival!

In late October, Middlesbrough peaked in fourth place after beating Queens Park Rangers 1-0 but they couldn’t keep up with their early tempo. An eight-game losing sequence saw Robson’s side plunge down the table but they still finished a creditable 12th, five points above safety.

 

1996-1997

In the summer of 1996, Middlesbrough recruited heavily as they signed Brazilian midfielder Emerson and Champions League winning-forward Fabrizio Ravanelli. Ravanelli sparkled instantly with a hat-trick on his debut against Liverpool FC in a 3-3 draw. Boro lost just twice in the opening two months and sat fourth but a 12-game winless sequence followed which would be very damaging for the club’s survival prospects.

In deep relegation trouble before Christmas, Middlesbrough failed to fulfil a fixture away at Blackburn Rovers due to a severe injury and illness crisis. Blackburn were incensed at the postponement at such short notice and the FA sided with them. In January, Middlesbrough were docked three points and fell seven points adrift of safety.

They went on a decent run afterwards but a fixtures pile-up saw them run out of steam in the closing weeks, despite going unbeaten in their last four matches. A 1-1 draw on the final day against Leeds United condemned them to relegation, despite herculean efforts from Juninho. Had those three points not been docked, they would have survived.

Two cup final defeats added to the agony for the supporters in what was a rollercoaster season that ended with a very nasty bump.

 

1998-1999

After one season away, Middlesbrough returned to the Premier League in 1998-1999 and achieved their highest top-flight finish in over 20 years. Bryan Robson’s side started very well and even enjoyed a 3-2 victory at Old Trafford over Manchester United in December which meant they were sitting in fourth place on Christmas Day. They lost just three games at The Riverside Stadium all season and claimed a final finishing position of ninth, drawing 15 of their 38 matches.

 

1999-2000

Although Middlesbrough fell three positions in the final standings compared to 1998-1999, they achieved one more point to finish with a new Premier League high of 52 points. Three wins from their first four games had Boro into the dizzy heights of second spot. They couldn’t quite maintain that position and even fell as low as 16th after a 4-0 loss on Valentine’s Day 2000 to Aston Villa.

A strong run of just two losses from their final 12 matches took the Teesiders clear of any relegation danger. For the second successive season, Hamilton Ricard was the top goalscorer for the club, scoring 12 times.

 

2000-2001

The 2000-2001 season was a frustrating one for Bryan Robson, Steve Gibson and everyone connected with Middlesbrough. Eight defeats in nine games saw Boro hit bottom spot in the table in mid-December and Gibson decided to act. He brought in former England boss Terry Venables to joint-manage the team alongside Robson. It worked as Middlesbrough recovered to finish 14th, despite just four home victories all season. A 3-0 away victory over Arsenal was the highlight of the campaign – a result that handed the 2000-2001 championship to Manchester United.

 

2001-2002

This was Steve McClaren’s first season in-charge of Middlesbrough after he left his post as Sir Alex Ferguson’s assistant at Manchester United. Things didn’t start well as the club lost their first four Premier League matches. However, a 2-0 home victory over West Ham United started a much better run of form. Just two defeats in their next 11 games took the Teesiders away from danger. McClaren’s side beat Manchester United at Old Trafford on their way to a final finishing position of 12th.

 

2002-2003

In early October, Middlesbrough peaked in third place in the table. Early victories included a 3-0 triumph at White Hart Lane against Tottenham Hotspur. The summer arrivals of Geremi, George Boateng and Massimo Maccarone had made the team harder to beat. However, a 1-0 loss at Charlton started a dreadful run of form away from home, which saw them lose eight successive away matches without scoring.

A 5-2 home defeat to Aston Villa in late January saw McClaren go on a deadline day splurge, signing Michael Ricketts from Bolton Wanderers and the Derby County pair of Malcolm Christie and Chris Riggott. Middlesbrough eventually finished in 11th and beat Manchester United and Liverpool FC during the campaign. However, it was a slightly disappointing result given their bright start.

 

2003-2004

Middlesbrough made an appalling start to the 2003-2004 campaign, losing four of their first five matches and collecting just one point in that period. It looked like a patchy season ahead but an unbeaten eight-game sequence in the winter months took them away from danger. For the second successive season, Boro finished in 11th place so it was another mediocre league campaign.

It was a historic season though for the club. For the first time in their 128-year history, they claimed silverware, beating Bolton Wanderers 2-1 in the League Cup final.

 

2004-2005

With Middlesbrough about to embark on a European campaign, there was plenty of experienced arrivals with Ray Parlour, Mark Viduka and Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink among the summer acquisitions. The club enjoyed their best-ever Premier League season, finishing in seventh position.

They found themselves up against Manchester City on the final day of the season with a point required to secure European qualification via the league. In stoppage-time, City won a penalty but Mark Schwarzer saved the spot-kick from Robbie Fowler to seal the point required that earned the club another season in the UEFA Cup.

 

2005-2006

After five years and 250 matches’ in-charge in all competitions, Steve McClaren left his position as manager at the end of the season to fill the vacancy as boss of the England national team. His final game saw the team compete in their first-ever European final, losing 4-0 in the UEFA Cup final to Spanish club Sevilla.

The league season was a major disappointment, finishing in a lowly 14th position, hurt by a succession of injuries and deep runs in three cup competitions. There were home victories against Arsenal, Manchester United and Chelsea but also defeats to the three newly-promoted clubs.

 

2006-2007

Club captain Gareth Southgate was appointed as McClaren’s successor for his first job in club management. His first home match in-charge was a memorable 2-1 victory over Chelsea whilst one of their most impressive displays came in January as top-four contenders Bolton Wanderers were well-beaten 5-1. However, poor away form hampered the ability for the club to escape the reaches of mid-table. Boro achieved just two away successes and finished 12th, eight points off the European positions and also eight points clear of any relegation danger.

 

2007-2008

The 2007-2008 season saw Middlesbrough play in their 4000th league game when they played Reading in March. They broke their transfer record in January to sign Afonso Alves for £12 million. Middlesbrough finished in 13th position and unrest seemed to be around the camp with three permanent captains appointed during the season. George Boateng, Julio Arca and Emanuel Pogatetz all took it in turns to wear the armband in a fairly unremarkable campaign for results.

 

2008-2009

Middlesbrough started the 2008-2009 season with their first opening day victory in eight years as they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 2-1. Two wins from their first three games hinted at a more positive season in the Premier League. In mid-November, the club were sitting in the mid-table positions but a 2-1 away victory at Aston Villa was their last success in 14 games. A shock 2-0 win over title challengers Liverpool FC stopped that sequence at the end of February. However, relegation was looking more likely as the season developed and just one more victory was achieved with the club’s 11-year Premier League tenure ending on the final day of the season.

 

2016-2017

After several seasons in the doldrums in the Championship, Middlesbrough managed to win promotion back to the top-flight in 2016. However, it would turn out to be a very tricky and ultimately, unsuccessful return to the Premier League. Despite having a strong defensive record, the attacking line-up was blunted by a lack of creativity. Middlesbrough scored just 27 goals in 38 matches which was the fewest of any of the 20 clubs in the campaign.

A run of 10 games without a win saw Aitor Karanka sacked as manager in early March after a 2-0 defeat to Stoke. Steve Agnew took interim charge until the end of the season but he couldn’t revive their fortunes. Relegation back to the Championship was confirmed by a 3-0 loss to eventual champions Chelsea on 8th May 2017.

The Clubs: Cardiff City

All-Time Premier League Record (upto 11th September 2018)

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
42 7 11 24 34 79 -45 32 2

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Steven Caulker 38
Fraizer Campbell 37
David Marshall 37
Jordon Mutch 35
Gary Medel 34
Peter Whittingham 32
Ben Turner 31
Kevin Theophile-Catherine 28
Kim Bo-Kyung 28
Aron Gunnarsson 23

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Jordon Mutch 7
Fraizer Campbell 6
Steven Caulker 5
Peter Whittingham 3
Craig Bellamy 2
Juan Cala 2
Kim Bo-Kyung 1
Victor Camarasa 1
Aron Gunnarsson 1
Kenwyne Jones 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Cardiff City 3-1 Fulham 8th March 2014 2013-2014
Cardiff City 3-2 Manchester City 25th August 2013 2013-2014
Fulham 1-2 Cardiff City 28th September 2013 2013-2014
Cardiff City 2-1 Norwich City 1st February 2014 2013-2014
Cardiff City 1-0 Swansea City 3rd November 2013 2013-2014

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Cardiff City 0-4 Hull City 22nd February 2014 2013-2014
Sunderland 4-0 Cardiff City 27th April 2014 2013-2014
Cardiff City 3-6 Liverpool FC 22nd March 2014 2013-2014
Chelsea 4-1 Cardiff City 19th October 2013 2013-2014
Cardiff City 0-3 Arsenal 30th November 2013 2013-2014

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Malky Mackay 1 27th December 2013
Ole Gunnar Solskjaer 1 18th September 2014
Neil Warnock 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Cardiff City 2-3 Arsenal 2nd September 2018 32,316 2018-2019
Cardiff City 0-0 Newcastle United 18th August 2018 30,720 2018-2019
Cardiff City 3-6 Liverpool FC 22nd March 2014 28,018 2013-2014
Cardiff City 2-2 Manchester United 24th November 2013 28,016 2013-2014
Cardiff City 0-3 Arsenal 30th November 2013 27,948 2013-2014

 

Intro

Cardiff City defied the expectations of many experts to earn promotion back to the Premier League for the 2018-2019 season, four years after their one-season dalliance in the top-flight which ended with a swift return to the Championship. Their sole full season did have a few highs but their relegation was unsurprising after a controversial decision was made by owner Vincent Tan to sack the manager, Malky Mackay. This time round, it is the experienced Neil Warnock in-charge and he will make the Bluebirds tough to beat.

 

2013-2014

Popular Scot Malky Mackay guided Cardiff City into the top-flight for the first time in the Premier League era as champions of the Championship. Mackay spent big to acquire the services of defensive midfielder Gary Medel and centre-back Steven Caulker. Both impressed but the overall quality of the squad wasn’t quite good enough to ultimately avoid an instant return to the second-tier.

Cardiff started well enough and no supporter will ever forget their first-ever Premier League home game at The Cardiff City Stadium. Big-spending Manchester City arrived and were expected to turn the Bluebirds over. However, Cardiff dominated the aerial battles and two headers from Fraizer Campbell helped the newcomers to a shock 3-2 victory. Unseen at the full-time whistle was a frosty reception given by owner Vincent Tan towards Mackay. It was already the beginning of the end for Mackay.

Cardiff did beat Swansea City 1-0 in the maiden Welsh Derby at Premier League level and drew at home with reigning champions Manchester United. However, hours before a trip to Anfield, an e-mail was leaked into the press from Tan telling Mackay to resign as boss or face being sacked. Mackay came out fighting after the 3-1 defeat to a Luis Suarez-inspired Liverpool FC side but a 3-0 home beating by Southampton on Boxing Day was the final blow. A day later, Tan sacked Mackay, much to the fans’ disgust. The real reasons for his sacking weren’t fully revealed until his application and sudden withdrawal for the vacant managerial position at Crystal Palace eight months later.

Ex-Manchester United scoring legend Ole Gunnar Solskjaer was appointed as new manager but the club were in a tailspin and he couldn’t guide them out of it either. Poor business in the January transfer window, including a swap deal with Stoke for Kenwyne Jones to arrive in-exchange for Peter Odemwingie didn’t help matters. Cardiff’s Premier League flame was extinguished on the final Saturday of the season when they lost 3-0 to Newcastle United. They finished bottom of the table with just seven wins to their name and 30 points. Solskjaer achieved just two league wins during his five-month reign as boss.

 

2018-2019

After a four-season absence, Cardiff returned to the top-flight and despite not winning any of their first four games, will scrap for every point possible. Goalkeeper Neil Etheridge has already shown his penalty-saving instincts, saving efforts from Callum Wilson and Kenedy in the season’s early weeks. The save from the latter in stoppage-time earned Cardiff a goalless draw with Newcastle United for their first point back in the big time.

The Bluebirds came from behind twice in their last match against Arsenal before being narrowly beaten 3-2 by the Gunners but Neil Warnock’s side will battle throughout and will win plenty of admirers throughout the season for the never-say-die attitude that the manager will demand from his players.