Category Archives: The Clubs

The Clubs: Huddersfield Town

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
38 9 10 19 28 58 -30 37 1

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Mathias ‘Zanka’ Jorgensen 38
Jonas Lossl 38
Christopher Schindler 37
Aaron Mooy 36
Laurent Depoitre 33
Tom Ince 33
Rajiv van La Parra 33
Jonathan Hogg 30
Steve Mounie 28
Collin Quaner 26

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Steve Mounie 7
Laurent Depoitre 6
Aaron Mooy 4
Rajiv van La Parra 3
Tom Ince 2
Elias Kachunga 1
Joe Lolley 1
Alex Pritchard 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Watford 1-4 Huddersfield Town 16th December 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 4-1 AFC Bournemouth 11th February 2018 2017-2018
Crystal Palace 0-3 Huddersfield Town 12th August 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 2-0 Brighton & Hove Albion 9th December 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 2-1 Manchester United 21st October 2017 2017-2018

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 5-0 Huddersfield Town 29th November 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 0-4 Tottenham Hotspur 30th September 2017 2017-2018
AFC Bournemouth 4-0 Huddersfield Town 18th November 2017 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-4 West Ham United 13th January 2018 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 3-0 Huddersfield Town 28th October 2017 2017-2018

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
David Wagner 3  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Huddersfield Town 2-1 Manchester United 21st October 2017 24,426 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-3 Chelsea 12th December 2017 24,169 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-0 West Bromwich Albion 4th November 2017 24,169 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 0-4 Tottenham Hotspur 30th September 2017 24,169 2017-2018
Huddersfield Town 1-1 Leicester City 16th September 2017 24,169 2017-2018

 

Intro

Huddersfield Town’s promotion to the Premier League was unexpected and it was a fairytale season for everyone connected with the club. The Terriers made a brilliant start, recording an unbelievable victory over Manchester United along the way and completed a great season by surviving in the top-flight.

Written off by many experts and neutrals before the season, David Wagner and his team proved a lot of people wrong. Huddersfield’s ability to stay in matches and produce unexpected victories gave them a fighting chance to avoid relegation and a 1-1 draw at Stamford Bridge confirmed their place among the elite for 2018-2019. It was a memorable moment in a season no-one connected with the club will ever forget.

 

2017-2018

Many expected Huddersfield to experience an immediate relegation after their play-off final success on penalties against Reading three months earlier. However, they made a brilliant start to the campaign and remained unbeaten at the end of August. One of many summer arrivals, Steve Mounie helped himself to a debut double at Selhurst Park as the Terriers won 3-0 away at Crystal Palace on the opening weekend.

A week later, Aaron Mooy’s terrific long-range effort defeated Newcastle United in Huddersfield’s first Premier League match on home soil and a goalless draw with Southampton kept them flying high at the end of August.

Having been ridiculed and dropped by Mainz after an underwhelming campaign in the Bundesliga, Jonas Lossl had a point to prove and the Dane became one of Huddersfield’s key figures throughout the season. Lossl became the final goalkeeper to be beaten in the season, when a deflected effort from Pedro Obiang of West Ham United ended his undefeated streak of 339 minutes without conceding. The 2-0 defeat at The London Stadium was Huddersfield’s first at Premier League level.

October brought about the club’s highest point of the season. Mooy put in an electrifying performance at the heart of the midfield and scored the opening goal at home to Manchester United. Laurent Depoitre added a second shortly afterwards and despite Marcus Rashford pulling a goal back in the second half, Huddersfield held on for a famous 2-1 victory in one of the shock results of the entire season.

Impressive 4-1 victories over Watford and AFC Bournemouth showed Huddersfield could turn on the style when everything clicked and Tom Ince’s dramatic late winner at home to the Hornets in mid-April seemed to have them on the cusp of safety. However, a 2-0 home defeat to Everton a fortnight later meant Huddersfield realistically needed points from their final three matches to survive. Trouble was they were against Manchester City, Chelsea and Arsenal. Their survival chances looked bleak.

However, Wagner’s side continued to defy the critics. A battling defensive performance saw them earn an excellent point away at champions Manchester City. After Swansea’s home defeat to Southampton 24 hours earlier, just one point was needed in the club’s final two matches of the season. They achieved it at Stamford Bridge. Depoitre’s early goal in the second half and a breathtaking save by Lossl from international compatriot Andreas Christensen preserved Huddersfield’s point. They drew 1-1 and that meant safety was ensured.

Huddersfield supporters can look forward to a second campaign in the top-flight and will hope to create more amazing headlines in the 2018-2019 season.

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The Clubs: Brighton & Hove Albion

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
38 9 13 16 34 54 -20 40 1

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Lewis Dunk 38
Pascal Gross 38
Mathew Ryan 38
Shane Duffy 37
Solly March 36
Dale Stephens 36
Glenn Murray 35
Davy Propper 35
Anthony Knockaert 33
Jose Izquierdo 32

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Glenn Murray 12
Pascal Gross 7
Jose Izquierdo 5
Anthony Knockaert 3
Tomer Hemed 2
Lewis Dunk 1
Jurgen Locadia 1
Solly March 1
Leonardo Ulloa 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Brighton & Hove Albion 4-1 Swansea City 24th February 2018 2017-2018
West Ham United 0-3 Brighton & Hove Albion 20th October 2017 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 3-1 West Bromwich Albion 9th September 2017 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 3-1 West Ham United 3rd February 2018 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 2-1 Arsenal 4th March 2018 2017-2018

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Brighton & Hove Albion 1-5 Liverpool FC 2nd December 2017 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-4 Chelsea 20th January 2018 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 4-0 Brighton & Hove Albion 13th May 2018 2017-2018
Manchester City 3-1 Brighton & Hove Albion 9th May 2018 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-2 Manchester City 12th August 2017 2017-2018

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Chris Hughton 4  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Brighton & Hove Albion 1-5 Liverpool FC 2nd December 2017 30,631 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-2 Leicester City 31st March 2018 30,629 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 2-1 Arsenal 4th March 2018 30,620 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 1-0 Manchester United 4th May 2018 30,611 2017-2018
Brighton & Hove Albion 0-4 Chelsea 20th January 2018 30,600 2017-2018

 

Intro

Brighton & Hove Albion made a successful debut in the Premier League. Chris Hughton’s side secured their survival on the penultimate weekend of the season but in truth, they were relatively comfortable all campaign. The Seagulls produced some fine performances on home soil and aided by the goals of Glenn Murray and creativity from Pascal Gross, they can look forward to a second successive season in the top-flight.

 

2017-2018

Having been promoted to the Premier League as Championship runners-up, Brighton & Hove Albion couldn’t have asked for a tougher start as title favourites Manchester City were their opening opponents. Chris Hughton’s side performed admirably but eventually lost 2-0 at home to the would-be champions at The Amex Stadium. August saw just one point gained and no goals scored.

However, Brighton started going in the right direction in September. Summer signing Pascal Gross scored the club’s first Premier League goal in their 3-1 victory at home to West Bromwich Albion which was also Brighton’s first victory in their Premier League life. Forward Tomer Hemed also scored in the win over the Baggies and a fortnight later, it was Hemed’s diving header that ensured back-to-back home victories as Newcastle United were defeated 1-0.

Home form was excellent all season for the men from the south coast. Just Manchester City, Liverpool FC, Chelsea and Leicester City left with all three points and there were some notable scalps along the way. Lewis Dunk’s only goal of the season started Hughton’s side on their way to a famous 2-1 victory over struggling Arsenal in March; Brighton’s first victory over the Gunners since 1982. Gross, who was voted the club’s Player of the Season, then made major contributions in two other impressive results. His spot-kick earned a hard-fought 1-1 draw with Tottenham Hotspur in April and a month later, it was the ex-Ingolstadt player who produced the winning goal against Manchester United that ultimately secured Brighton’s safety.

Hughton’s deals in the transfer market were impressive too. Gross had been signed for a bargain amount and other astute deals included the signings of Davy Propper from PSV Eindhoven, Jose Izquierdo from Club Brugge and the January arrival of Jurgen Locadia, also from PSV. The highlight away from home was a stunning 3-0 triumph at The London Stadium over West Ham United in October. Glenn Murray scored twice and he was the top goalscorer with 12 goals in an excellent campaign for him personally.

Brighton finished the season in 15th place and have already started to put the foundations in-place for a second campaign in the Premier League.

The Clubs: Queens Park Rangers

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
278 81 65 132 339 431 -92 308 7

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Andy Impey 142
Simon Barker 132
David Bardsley 131
Clive Wilson 118
Alan McDonald 116
Les Ferdinand 110
Ian Holloway 107
Trevor Sinclair 101
Ray Wilkins 84
Steve Yates 82

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Les Ferdinand 60
Bradley Allen 20
Charlie Austin 18
Kevin Gallen 18
Gary Penrice 17
Simon Barker 15
Danny Dichio 13
Andy Impey 11
Trevor Sinclair 10
Djibril Cisse 9

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Queens Park Rangers 5-1 Coventry City 23rd October 1993 1993-1994
West Ham United 0-4 Queens Park Rangers 28th August 1993 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 4-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd October 1992 1992-1993
West Bromwich Albion 1-4 Queens Park Rangers 4th April 2015 2014-2015
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 Ipswich Town 2nd October 1993 1993-1994
Everton 0-3 Queens Park Rangers 20th November 1993 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 Newcastle United 4th February 1995 1994-1995
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 Southampton 30th March 1996 1995-1996
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 West Ham United 27th April 1996 1995-1996
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-3 Queens Park Rangers 17th September 2011 2011-2012

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Fulham 6-0 Queens Park Rangers 2nd October 2011 2011-2012
Manchester City 6-0 Queens Park Rangers 10th May 2015 2014-2015
Chelsea 6-1 Queens Park Rangers 29th April 2012 2011-2012
Queens Park Rangers 0-5 Swansea City 18th August 2012 2012-2013
Leicester City 5-1 Queens Park Rangers 24th May 2015 2014-2015
Queens Park Rangers 0-4 Leeds United 4th April 1994 1993-1994
Blackburn Rovers 4-0 Queens Park Rangers 26th November 1994 1994-1995
Leeds United 4-0 Queens Park Rangers 24th January 1995 1994-1995
Queens Park Rangers 0-4 Bolton Wanderers 13th August 2011 2011-2012
Tottenham Hotspur 4-0 Queens Park Rangers 24th August 2014 2014-2015

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Gerry Francis 3 11th November 1994
Ray Wilkins 3 4th September 1996
Neil Warnock 3 8th January 2012
Mark Hughes 2 23rd November 2012
Harry Redknapp 3 3rd February 2015
Chris Ramsey 2 4th November 2015

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Queens Park Rangers 2-3 Manchester United 5th February 1994 21,267 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 1-3 Manchester United 18th January 1993 21,117 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 0-1 Liverpool FC 23rd November 1992 21,056 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 0-0 Arsenal 2nd September 1992 20,868 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 4-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd October 1992 19,845 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 1-3 Liverpool FC 18th August 1993 19,635 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 2-1 Leeds United 24th October 1992 19,326 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 2-3 Manchester United 10th December 1994 18,948 1994-1995
Queens Park Rangers 2-1 Aston Villa 8th May 1993 18,904 1992-1993
Queens Park Rangers 3-0 West Ham United 27th April 1996 18,828 1995-1996

 

Intro

Queens Park Rangers have experienced an up-and-down adventure in the Premier League. They were the best team in the capital in the 1992-1993 Premier League season but were relegated just three seasons later. Neil Warnock ended their 15-year hiatus in 2011 but QPR have since gone down on two more occasions, attempting to spend big and not getting the balance of their squad right. Former Premier League manager Steve McClaren has recently replaced Ian Holloway and will try to get the club away from the mid-table reaches of the Championship on a regular basis.

 

1992-1993

Queens Park Rangers finished as London’s top team in the first Premier League season, ending in an excellent fifth position. Les Ferdinand achieved back-to-back hat-tricks during the Easter programme and finished runner-up to Teddy Sheringham in the race for the Golden Boot. It wasn’t quite enough to achieve European football for the following season but it showed how far Gerry Francis’ side had come.

 

1993-1994

Although there was a drop from fifth to ninth place, Queens Park Rangers were once again an entertaining side to watch in 1993-1994. Francis’ excellent reign saw him linked to the England job when Graham Taylor resigned and he then turned down the chance to manage an ambitious Wolverhampton Wanderers in Division One in March 1994. The sale of Darren Peacock to Newcastle United frustrated the manager but Les Ferdinand sparkled again with 16 goals.

 

1994-1995

Queens Park Rangers underperformed badly in the 1994-1995 early weeks and a nine-game winless sequence early on saw them struggling in 20th after a 4-2 loss to Norwich City in October 1994. Their season kick-started at the end of October with back-to-back home victories over Aston Villa and Liverpool FC but the corner would be turned without Gerry Francis. He resigned in early November after feeling trust had broken down between himself and the board over the planned appointment of club icon Rodney Marsh as a Director of Football.

Francis was replaced by former player Ray Wilkins, who was released by Crystal Palace to take his first job in management. He guided QPR to a fine eighth-place finish and the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. Les Ferdinand was top scorer again but would leave in the off-season to join Newcastle United.

 

1995-1996

The decision not to reinvest the Ferdinand money was a bad decision, even though both Kevin Gallen and Danny Dichio did well in a struggling side. Three wins in the first eight matches did have QPR in 12th place at the end of September but that was the highest the Hoops would get all season in the table.

A dire run of seven successive defeats from Boxing Day to 11th February would give Wilkins’ side too much to do. Despite a 3-0 victory in their final home match of the season against London rivals West Ham United, Queens Park Rangers were relegated in 19th place – ending their 13-year stay in England’s top-flight.

 

2011-2012

After an absence of 15 years, Queens Park Rangers returned to the top-flight in-time for the 2011-2012 season with Neil Warnock as the club’s manager. He invested in experience in the summer, with the likes of Joey Barton, Anton Ferdinand, Shaun Wright-Phillips and Kieron Dyer among the new recruits.

QPR actually made a decent start and when they won 3-2 away at Stoke City in mid-November, they moved into ninth place. However, that would be Warnock’s final win as manager. Two points from the next eight matches saw them drop into relegation danger and Warnock lost his job as a result. He was replaced by Mark Hughes.

Loftus Road became a tough place for stronger sides to visit. The likes of Liverpool FC, Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur were all beaten there in the run-in and it was this fortress that ensured QPR escaped relegation on the final day of the season by just a single point.

 

2012-2013

It took Queens Park Rangers a full 17 matches before they even tasted victory in a wretched 2012-2013 campaign. When it came in a 2-1 success over London rivals Fulham, the die looked like it had already been cast. Mark Hughes was sacked in mid-November and an ageing squad just didn’t perform even for Harry Redknapp. It was a team with plenty of individuals but they didn’t seem to gel as a team.

Redknapp did make QPR tougher to beat when he arrived but just three further victories were achieved against Southampton, Sunderland and most surprisingly, away at Chelsea in January 2013. Shaun Wright-Phillips’ winning goal at Stamford Bridge was the only bright spark in a wretched season. Relegation was officially confirmed by a forgettable 0-0 draw at Reading in April, who also went down on the same afternoon.

 

2014-2015

After a late winner from Bobby Zamora in the Championship play-off final against Derby County, QPR returned to the top-flight and Redknapp was still at the helm. He spent £32 million in the summer in a bid to try and avoid the problems of the last Premier League campaign.

He did have a proven goalscorer in Charlie Austin. Austin scored 18 Premier League goals and netted a hat-trick in a thrilling 3-2 comeback victory over West Bromwich Albion in December. It was part of a home sequence that saw QPR amass 13 points from five games, including a 2-2 draw with defending champions Manchester City, where Austin again starred with two goals.

Away form was less impressive though. They collected just seven points on their travels and none under Redknapp’s time at the club. He stepped down in early February, citing a knee operation as the cause for his abrupt departure. Chris Ramsey took caretaker charge but QPR were fighting a losing battle and their fate was sealed by a 6-0 loss at Manchester City in May.

The Clubs: Blackpool

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
38 10 9 19 55 78 -23 39 1

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Ian Evatt 38
Charlie Adam 35
David Vaughan 35
DJ Campbell 31
Stephen Crainey 31
Neal Eardley 31
Gary Taylor-Fletcher 31
Craig Cathcart 30
Luke Varney 30
Matt Phillips 27

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
DJ Campbell 13
Charlie Adam 12
Marlon Harewood 5
Gary Taylor-Fletcher 5
Luke Varney 5
Jason Puncheon 3
Alex Baptiste 2
Matt Phillips 2
David Vaughan 2
Craig Cathcart 1

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Wigan Athletic 0-4 Blackpool 14th August 2010 2010-2011
Blackpool 3-1 Tottenham Hotspur 22nd February 2011 2010-2011
Newcastle United 0-2 Blackpool 11th September 2010 2010-2011
Sunderland 0-2 Blackpool 28th December 2010 2010-2011
Blackpool 4-3 Bolton Wanderers 14th May 2011 2010-2011

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 6-0 Blackpool 21st August 2010 2010-2011
Chelsea 4-0 Blackpool 19th September 2010 2010-2011
Wolverhampton Wanderers 4-0 Blackpool 26th February 2011 2010-2011
Fulham 3-0 Blackpool 3rd April 2011 2010-2011
Everton 5-3 Blackpool 5th February 2011 2010-2011

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Ian Holloway 4 3rd November 2012

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Blackpool 2-3 Manchester City 17th October 2010 16,116 2010-2011
Blackpool 2-2 Everton 6th November 2010 16,094 2010-2011
Blackpool 2-1 Liverpool FC 12th January 2011 16,089 2010-2011
Blackpool 3-1 Tottenham Hotspur 22nd February 2011 16,069 2010-2011
Blackpool 1-2 Sunderland 22nd January 2011 16,037 2010-2011

 

Intro

Blackpool might have only been part of the Premier League party for a single season but they were a neutral’s favourite. Their all-out attack policy won many fans and saw the Tangerines involved in some of the best matches of the 2010-2011 Premier League season. Ian Holloway’s side were box-office material, enjoying a league double over Liverpool FC along the way. Sadly, form and confidence caught up with the Seasiders in the second half of the season and a 4-2 loss on the final day to Manchester United saw them relegated exactly a year to the day when they were promoted.

 

2010-2011

Blackpool began the 2010-2011 season as bookies favourites to be relegated after their surprising promotion via the play-offs. However, Ian Holloway and his side didn’t read the script on day one. They tore Wigan Athletic apart in a game moved to Wigan’s home ground whilst development work was being completed on Bloomfield Road to meet Premier League standards. Blackpool won 4-0, with debutant Marlon Harewood scoring twice.

There were sensational away victories at Newcastle United, Stoke City and Sunderland as Blackpool fast became away day specialists. In October 2011, they gave Liverpool FC one of their darkest results in their Premier League history, beating the Reds 2-1 at Anfield. DJ Campbell was top scorer with 13 goals, backed up by some heroic performances from Charlie Adam.

Blackpool sat eighth at the turn of the year and completed a league double over Liverpool FC in the early weeks of January 2011. A 3-2 loss to West Bromwich Albion days later though started a dramatic turn in their fortunes. Holloway’s men lost seven of their next nine matches and began to fall down towards the relegation places. When Wigan gained revenge for their opening day defeat in mid-April with a 3-1 away win at Bloomfield Road, Blackpool had dropped into the bottom three for the first time in the season.

A four-game unbeaten run followed and a belting 4-3 victory over Bolton Wanderers in their final home match left Blackpool outside the bottom three going into the final day. A positive result at Old Trafford on the final day and they could still achieve survival. Adam and Gary Taylor-Fletcher scored to have the visitors leading 2-1 early in the second half but defensive frailties caught up with them. They lost 4-2 and that condemned them to relegation regardless of other results. Despite scoring as many goals as fifth-placed Tottenham Hotspur, Blackpool’s leaky defence would cost them. They shipped 78 goals and that meant they were heading back to the Championship.

It was short-lived but a season their supporters will never forget.

The Clubs: Wimbledon

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
316 99 94 123 384 472 -88 391 8

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Robbie Earle 243
Marcus Gayle 204
Kenny Cunningham 201
Alan Kimble 181
Neil Sullivan 179
Vinnie Jones 177
Dean Holdsworth 169
Neal Ardley 168
Chris Perry 167
Dean Blackwell 157

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Dean Holdsworth 58
Robbie Earle 45
Efan Ekoku 38
Marcus Gayle 34
Jason Euell 21
John Fashanu 17
Carl Cort 16
Oyvind Leonhardsen 13
Neal Ardley 12
Vinnie Jones 12

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Wimbledon 5-0 Watford 4th December 1999 1999-2000
Wimbledon 4-0 Crystal Palace 9th April 1993 1992-1993
Wimbledon 4-0 Everton 7th September 1996 1996-1997
Wimbledon 5-2 Oldham Athletic 12th December 1992 1992-1993
Wimbledon 4-1 Blackburn Rovers 29th March 1994 1993-1994
Wimbledon 4-1 Barnsley 23rd September 1997 1997-1998
Wimbledon 3-0 Norwich City 20th March 1993 1992-1993
Wimbledon 3-0 Swindon Town 6th November 1993 1993-1994
Wimbledon 3-0 Oldham Athletic 26th April 1994 1993-1994
Queens Park Rangers 0-3 Wimbledon 23rd August 1995 1995-1996

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Aston Villa 7-1 Wimbledon 11th February 1995 1994-1995
Newcastle United 6-1 Wimbledon 21st October 1995 1995-1996
Aston Villa 5-0 Wimbledon 22nd December 1996 1996-1997
Arsenal 5-0 Wimbledon 18th April 1998 1997-1998
Oldham Athletic 6-2 Wimbledon 3rd April 1993 1992-1993
Wimbledon 2-6 Tottenham Hotspur 2nd May 1998 1997-1998
Manchester United 5-1 Wimbledon 17th October 1998 1998-1999
Arsenal 5-1 Wimbledon 19th April 1999 1998-1999
Sheffield Wednesday 5-1 Wimbledon 2nd October 1999 1999-2000
Leeds United 4-0 Wimbledon 2nd October 1993 1993-1994

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Joe Kinnear 7 9th June 1999
Egil Olsen 1 1st May 2000
Terry Burton 1 25th April 2002

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Wimbledon 1-2 Manchester United 8th May 1993 30,115 1992-1993
Wimbledon 1-0 Manchester United 16th April 1994 28,553 1993-1994
Wimbledon 2-5 Manchester United 22nd November 1997 26,309 1997-1998
Wimbledon 2-2 Manchester United 26th February 2000 26,129 1999-2000
Wimbledon 1-1 Manchester United 3rd April 1999 26,121 1998-1999
Wimbledon 1-1 Liverpool FC 9th August 1997 26,106 1997-1998
Wimbledon 1-2 Liverpool FC 16th April 2000 26,102 1999-2000
Wimbledon 1-0 Liverpool FC 13th December 1998 26,080 1998-1999
Wimbledon 1-0 Arsenal 21st November 1998 26,003 1998-1999
Wimbledon 1-3 Arsenal 1st April 2000 25,858 1999-2000

 

Intro

Often defying the odds in the 1990s, going to Selhurst Park to play the tenants of Wimbledon was often a fearful thought. “The Crazy Gang” had the ability to completely upset an opponent’s gameplan with their intimidating approach to the game. It might not have been everyone’s cup of tea but Wimbledon did make the critics eat their words on many occasions. They finished sixth in 1993-1994 and eighth in 1996-1997. Relegation did follow in 2000 and Wimbledon eventually made a controversial move to Milton Keynes in 2002, reforming as Milton Keynes Dons two years later.

 

1992-1993

Tipped as relegation favourites by many football experts at the start of the inaugural Premier League season, it looked like they might be right when Wimbledon spent Boxing Day in the drop zone. That was despite a shock 1-0 victory away at Old Trafford in October thanks to a Lawrie Sanchez goal.

However, the south Londoners rallied in the second half of the season, doing the league double over Liverpool FC and thrashing their landlords Crystal Palace 4-0 in April. Wimbledon finished 12th in the table and only Les Ferdinand and Teddy Sheringham scored more goals than Dean Holdsworth in the division. He netted 19 times.

 

1993-1994

Unlike the previous campaign, Wimbledon started the 1993-1994 season in good form, losing just one of their first nine matches. A run of one win in nine games followed which saw them drop into the mid-table positions by Christmas but Wimbledon rallied fantastically in 1994 and were the form side in the division by the end of the campaign.

Holdsworth struck 24 goals in all competitions and the Dons won seven of their final 10 matches to finish sixth in the standings – equalling their highest top-flight finish set back in 1987. Out of the London clubs, only Arsenal finished higher and there were notable home successes against runners-up Blackburn Rovers and champions Manchester United.

 

1994-1995

In the summer of 1994, Joe Kinnear elected to sell a Wimbledon stalwart in the form of John Fashanu. He departed to join Aston Villa for £1.35 million. His replacement was Efan Ekoku, who arrived from Norwich City two months into the campaign. Ekoku finished as the club’s top goalscorer with nine goals as Wimbledon finished ninth in the table after a steady season.

Among the highlights were a four-game winning sequence in March and a 3-2 victory in November over Newcastle United which knocked the Geordies off top spot. They did suffer their worst-ever Premier League loss though, going down 7-1 at Aston Villa in February.

 

1995-1996

In the close season, Wimbledon sold Warren Barton to Newcastle United for a British transfer record fee for a defender but started the campaign very well, with just one defeat from their first five games which came at Old Trafford. However, after a 1-0 success over Liverpool FC, the Dons didn’t win another Premier League game until a Boxing Day triumph in a London Derby at Chelsea.

Wimbledon’s defence was their Achilles heel throughout the season. Only relegated Bolton Wanderers conceded more goals (71) than Kinnear’s side did (70) and he didn’t seem to settle on a regular goalkeeper throughout the season with Paul Heald, Hans Segers and Neil Sullivan all having spells in-goal. They finished 14th but only three points clear of trouble in a campaign that didn’t fulfil pre-season expectations.

 

1996-1997

Wimbledon were involved in one of the Premier League’s most iconic goals on the opening day of the season as David Beckham managed to score from inside his own half in stoppage-time of Manchester United’s opening day 3-0 victory. Further defeats in away games at Newcastle United and Leeds United followed. It seemed like tough days were ahead for the Dons.

Then, they defied the critics again, going on a 19-match unbeaten run, which included seven Premier League victories in a row. After Dean Holdsworth’s late header beat Blackburn Rovers 1-0 in mid-December, Wimbledon sat in third position in the table and just a single point behind league leaders Arsenal.

However, they were hammered 5-0 in their very next match by Aston Villa and just five further wins followed. Despite making the semi-finals of both domestic cup competitions, Wimbledon missed out on European football, finishing in eighth position. However, it was still considered a remarkable season given the small fanbase and lack of resources that were available to manager Joe Kinnear.

 

1997-1998

“The Crazy Gang” spirit was once more fully shown throughout the 1997-1998 season which was a tougher campaign after the club’s all-time leading Premier League goalscorer, Dean Holdsworth was transferred to newly-promoted Bolton Wanderers in October. Another icon to depart before the season’s end was Vinnie Jones who was sold to Queens Park Rangers in March 1998 for £750,000.

Wimbledon did reach ninth place in the table when Marcus Gayle’s header beat Leicester City 1-0 at Filbert Street but once again, form dropped alarmingly in the second half of the season. Although never in any real danger of being relegated, Wimbledon ended in 15th place which was their worst-ever top-flight finish at this point.

 

1998-1999

With 11 matches left in the 1998-1999 season, Wimbledon were right in the race to qualify for the UEFA Cup. Among their victims at Selhurst Park in the season were Arsenal and Liverpool FC, whilst champions-elect Manchester United were held to a 1-1 draw. They were sixth in the table ahead of a trip to Hillsborough to play Sheffield Wednesday in March.

Manager Joe Kinnear was taken to hospital after suffering a heart attack. He would be sidelined for the remainder of the season and without their leader, Wimbledon seemed to lose all direction. In their last 11 games, they claimed just two points and dropped to 16th in the final standings, their lowest finish since entering the top-flight in 1986.

The club did break their transfer record in January to sign John Hartson for £7.5 million from London rivals, West Ham United.

 

1999-2000

On health grounds, Joe Kinnear stepped down in the summer after seven years as the Wimbledon gaffer and he was replaced by Norwegian Egil Olsen, whose style of football was fairly similar to Kinnear’s preferences.

For much of the season, Wimbledon seemed fairly comfortable in the lower reaches of mid-table but a run of eight straight defeats in March and April saw them dragged into the relegation dogfight. Owner Sam Hamann left in February and star striker Hartson fell out with the manager after a planned move to Tottenham Hotspur collapsed.

After a 3-0 defeat away to relegation rivals Bradford City at the end of April, Olsen paid for strained relations with most of his playing squad and lost his job. Kinnear’s former no.2, Terry Burton stepped into the breach and a 2-2 draw at home to Aston Villa ensured they went into the final day in control of their own destiny.

However, Bradford’s shock final day victory over Liverpool FC, combined with the Dons 2-0 defeat to Southampton ended their 14-year stay in the top-flight. Their relegation was confirmed 12 years to the day of their biggest triumph which was victory in the 1988 FA Cup final.

The Clubs: West Ham United

All data correct upto 23rd April 2018

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
840 273 220 347 1006 1209 -203 1039 22

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Mark Noble 314
Carlton Cole 216
Steve Potts 204
James Collins 187
Robert Green 177
Trevor Sinclair 177
John Moncur 175
Ludek Miklosko 169
Winston Reid 166
James Tomkins 164

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Paolo Di Canio 48
Carlton Cole 41
Mark Noble 36
Trevor Sinclair 36
Andy Carroll 33
Freddie Kanoute 29
John Hartson 24
Frank Lampard 24
Tony Cottee 23
Julian Dicks 21

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
West Ham United 6-0 Barnsley 10th January 1998 1997-1998
West Ham United 5-0 Coventry City 22nd April 2000 1999-2000
West Ham United 5-0 Charlton Athletic 26th December 2000 2000-2001
Derby County 0-5 West Ham United 10th November 2007 2007-2008
West Ham United 5-1 Sheffield Wednesday 3rd May 1997 1996-1997
West Ham United 5-1 Derby County 17th April 1999 1998-1999
West Ham United 4-0 Middlesbrough 16th May 1999 1998-1999
West Ham United 4-0 Derby County 26th December 2001 2001-2002
West Ham United 4-0 Aston Villa 12th September 2005 2005-2006
Tottenham Hotspur 1-4 West Ham United 4th April 1994 1993-1994

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 7-1 West Ham United 1st April 2000 1999-2000
Blackburn Rovers 7-1 West Ham United 14th October 2001 2001-2002
Everton 6-0 West Ham United 8th May 1999 1998-1999
Reading 6-0 West Ham United 1st January 2007 2006-2007
Sheffield Wednesday 5-0 West Ham United 18th December 1993 1993-1994
Liverpool FC 5-0 West Ham United 2nd May 1998 1997-1998
Everton 5-0 West Ham United 29th September 2001 2001-2002
Newcastle United 5-0 West Ham United 5th January 2011 2010-2011
West Ham United 1-5 Leeds United 1st May 1999 1998-1999
Chelsea 5-1 West Ham United 20th January 2002 2001-2002

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Billy Bonds 1 10th August 1994
Harry Redknapp 7 9th May 2001
Glenn Roeder 2 24th August 2003
Alan Pardew 2 11th December 2006
Alan Curbishley 3 3rd September 2008
Gianfranco Zola 2 11th May 2010
Avram Grant 1 15th May 2011
Sam Allardyce 3 24th May 2015
Slaven Bilic 3 6th November 2017
David Moyes 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
West Ham United 0-2 Manchester United 2nd January 2017 56,996 2016-2017
West Ham United 1-0 Tottenham Hotspur 5th May 2017 56,992 2016-2017
West Ham United 1-0 Burnley 14th December 2016 56,990 2016-2017
West Ham United 2-3 Tottenham Hotspur 23rd September 2017 56,988 2017-2018
West Ham United 1-0 Sunderland 22nd October 2016 56,985 2016-2017
West Ham United 0-4 Liverpool FC 14th May 2017 56,985 2016-2017
West Ham United 3-0 Crystal Palace 14th January 2017 56,984 2016-2017
West Ham United 1-2 Chelsea 6th March 2017 56,984 2016-2017
West Ham United 2-2 West Bromwich Albion 11th February 2017 56,983 2016-2017
West Ham United 0-4 Manchester City 1st February 2017 56,980 2016-2017

 

Intro

This is West Ham United’s 22nd Premier League season and the Hammers have often been in the headlines. They finished in fifth place in 1999 under the wise guidance of Harry Redknapp and narrowly missed out on a top six finish in 2016. They left behind Upton Park to move into The London Stadium in time for the 2016-2017 season but it has been a tricky time since the change in stadium. David Moyes is the current manager and looks to have guided them to another season of Premier League football for 2018-2019.

 

1993-1994

It was Billy Bonds who guided West Ham United into the Premier League and they finished a creditable 13th in the table, without ever looking like being dragged into a relegation battle. It was veteran Clive Allen who scored both goals in their first Premier League victory over Sheffield Wednesday but Trevor Morley led the goalscoring charts with 13 goals. Highlights included a 2-0 victory away at Blackburn Rovers in September and 4-1 thrashing of Tottenham Hotspur in April.

 

1994-1995

There was a change in management just days before the season started. Fearing that their assistant manager Harry Redknapp was about to return to AFC Bournemouth as manager, the directors promoted him to the manager’s post at Upton Park. Billy Bonds resigned acrimoniously and Redknapp immediately had a point to prove to the supporters.

Re-signing the likes of Tony Cottee and Julian Dicks helped but the Londoners spent a good portion of the season in the bottom four. Just one defeat in their last 11 games though steered them to safety and a 14th place finish which including impressive home wins over Blackburn Rovers and Liverpool FC.

 

1995-1996

West Ham achieved their first top-half finish since promotion to the Premier League. A 10th place result saw a best finish for the club in the top-flight since coming third in 1986. Left-back Julian Dicks was joint-top scorer with 10 goals alongside the experienced Tony Cottee and the season also saw Premier League debuts for future title winners, Rio Ferdinand and Frank Lampard.

 

1996-1997

There was plenty of excitement in pre-season about the arrival of Romanian forward Florin Raducioiu. However, he scored just twice and walked out on the club mid-season. It was a season of struggle and in early February, West Ham looked in genuine danger of being relegated. Redknapp then went into the transfer market and the double striker arrival of Paul Kitson and John Hartson took them clear of trouble. West Ham finished 14th with Kitson scoring an impressive eight times to finish top scorer despite not being with the club for over half the campaign.

 

1997-1998

A quantum leap forward was made in the 1997-1998 season as West Ham wound up in an excellent 8th place. John Hartson was the top goalscorer with 15 goals and young defender Rio Ferdinand won his first international call-up as his rise through the ranks continued. A 6-0 victory over Barnsley in January 1998 remains their biggest-ever Premier League victory.

 

1998-1999

There was another busy summer at Upton Park with the likes of Shaka Hislop, Neil Ruddock and Arsenal goalscoring great Ian Wright all arriving at the club. West Ham made a brilliant start to the season and a 2-1 victory over Tottenham Hotspur at the end of November took them into the dizzying heights of second position in the table.

Whilst the likes of Manchester United, Arsenal and Chelsea eventually overtook the Hammers, West Ham’s final finish of 5th place ensured UEFA Cup football and a return to European action for the first time in 19 years. This was despite selling John Hartson in January 1999 to Wimbledon for £7 million.

 

1999-2000

For the third successive season, West Ham United finished in the Premier League’s top 10 with a 9th place finish. Joe Cole and Michael Carrick were another two players from the famed academy to make the breakthrough into the first-team. Having arrived halfway through the previous season, Paolo Di Canio scored 16 times including winning Goal of the Season for a spectacular volley against Wimbledon in March.

West Ham were also involved in one of the games of the season, beating Bradford City 5-4 in February, despite trailing 1-0, 3-1 and 4-2 during the match. They did lose 7-1 to Manchester United in April which is their joint-biggest defeat in Premier League history.

 

2000-2001

This turned out to be Harry Redknapp’s final season as West Ham manager and one of his toughest. The sale of Rio Ferdinand in November 2000 to Leeds United for £18 million strained relations between the board and manager and Redknapp left just before the season ended. He fell out with owner Terry Brown over transfer funds for the forthcoming season. Youth coach Glenn Roeder would take over on a permanent basis in the off-season.

 

2001-2002

The Glenn Roeder reign got off to a dreadful start. West Ham won just one of their first seven matches and suffered back-to-back heavy thrashings at the hands of Everton and Blackburn Rovers in the autumn. So, he did brilliantly to steer the club away from trouble and they finished an impressive 7th in the final standings. Frank Lampard was sold in pre-season to Chelsea but Paolo Di Canio stayed despite nearly joining Manchester United in January and Freddie Kanoute was top scorer for the second successive season with 11 goals.

 

2002-2003

Despite having the likes of Joe Cole, Michael Carrick, Jermain Defoe, David James and Paolo Di Canio among their squad, West Ham United were relegated at the end of the season, despite achieving 42 points which normally guarantees Premier League safety. West Ham made a wretched start again, not winning until late September and spending Christmas Day bottom of the table.

They didn’t win at Upton Park until a 2-1 victory over Blackburn Rovers in January. Football didn’t matter in late April though when manager Glenn Roeder collapsed shortly after a victory against Middlesbrough. Roeder was diagnosed with a non-malignant brain tumour which was successfully operated on.

That meant club legend Trevor Brooking took charge of the final three games. He got them important wins over Manchester City and Chelsea and a final day draw with Birmingham City. However, the form of other sides at the wrong end of the table was just as impressive and that meant West Ham’s 10-year tenure in the top-flight ended.

 

2005-2006

After two years in the wilderness of the Championship, West Ham United returned to the Premier League in 2005-2006 with Alan Pardew as the manager. They made a good start and sat fourth at the end of September with 11 points from their first six matches. There were excellent victories away at Highbury against Arsenal in February and on the final day at home to Tottenham Hotspur. West Ham finished a very satisfying ninth in the table and reached the FA Cup final where they lost on penalties to Liverpool FC.

 

2006-2007

On transfer deadline day, West Ham shocked the football world with the signings of Argentine duo Carlos Tevez and Javier Mascherano. It would ensure for a dramatic season in the East End of London. Both players failed to sparkle and Mascherano would move on-loan to Liverpool FC in January. By this point, Alan Pardew had been sacked as the Hammers slipped into the bottom three. He was replaced by Alan Curbishley but form continued to elude the club.

They received a 6-0 mauling from Reading on New Years’ Day and when Tottenham Hotspur produced a dramatic fightback to snatch a 4-3 victory at Upton Park in March, West Ham were bottom and 10 points adrift of safety with just nine games to play. Relegation looked all but a formality. However, Tevez suddenly discovered his scoring touch, putting in some magical displays and West Ham won seven of their last nine matches to climb off the bottom and out of the relegation zone. On the final day, Tevez scored the winner at Old Trafford to ensure the club’s safety amidst high controversy.

The signings of Tevez and Mascherano breached Premier League rules regarding third-party ownership of players. West Ham pleaded guilty to the charges and rather than a points deduction, were given a hefty fine, much to the chagrin of relegation rivals Sheffield United, Fulham and Wigan Athletic.

 

2007-2008

Alan Curbishley’s first full season as West Ham manager was unremarkable to say the least. The club finished in 10th place, well clear of relegation danger but not strong enough to create a challenge for the European qualifying positions. Dean Ashton was top scorer with 10 goals after recovering from a broken ankle that had ruled him out of the whole of the previous campaign.

 

2008-2009

Despite winning two of their first three games, Alan Curbishley resigned as manager after stating not having full control over transfers. He was annoyed to see defenders Anton Ferdinand and George McCartney sold to Sunderland without his knowledge. He was replaced by Chelsea playing legend Gianfranco Zola. Despite winning just three of his first 14 Premier League matches, a 4-1 victory on Boxing Day over Portsmouth started an excellent sequence that took West Ham into the top half.

They finished in ninth spot, despite losing Craig Bellamy in the January transfer window to Manchester City and Dean Ashton to retirement.

 

2009-2010

An opening day victory away at Molineux hinted at another encouraging campaign but Zola found the going very tough and West Ham went winless until a late Zavon Hines goal defeated Aston Villa in early November. November was the club’s best month of the season, with seven points from four games.

There was a change in the boardroom in January with the former Birmingham City owners, David Gold and David Sullivan succeeding cash-strapped Icelandic owner Björgólfur Gudmundsson. They immediately identified Zola as the wrong man for the job and sacked him at the end of the season. West Ham finished a disappointing 17th, narrowly avoiding relegation after a 3-2 victory over Wigan Athletic in late April.

 

2010-2011

Avram Grant was appointed as Zola’s successor following Portsmouth’s relegation from the Premier League. It didn’t seem like an inspired choice and losing their first four matches put the Hammers on the backfoot for the entire campaign. Bottom on Christmas Day, there was a brief revival over the festive period with victories over Fulham and Wolverhampton Wanderers, along with a draw against Everton. However, West Ham won just three games in 2011 and after throwing away a two-goal lead to lose 3-2 to Wigan Athletic on the penultimate weekend, the club were relegated.

Grant was sacked pretty much straight after the game and replaced in the off-season by Sam Allardyce. The one crumb of comfort for supporters was the sensational form of Scott Parker. The midfielder won the Football Writers’ award, despite playing for a relegated side.

 

2012-2013

Sam Allardyce guided West Ham back into the Premier League at the first attempt via the play-offs. He strengthened the squad with the arrivals of experienced players like Jussi Jaaskelainen, Mohamed Diame and James Collins, who returned for a second spell after a stint at Aston Villa. Allardyce also managed to bring Andy Carroll into the club on-loan after he fell out of favour at Liverpool FC.

After winning four of their first eight matches, West Ham sat sixth in the table and never looked in any relegation danger. 14th was the lowest position they’d occupy all season which was after a defeat to Chelsea in March. In the end, a 10th place finish was a good season for all parties with skipper Kevin Nolan ending as top scorer. His 10 goals figure was helped by a final day hat-trick at home to Reading.

 

2013-2014

Sam Allardyce’s third season as West Ham United manager was his toughest as the Hammers struggled to find any consistency. The Hammers won just three games in the first half of the season, although one of those victories was a notable 3-0 away triumph at White Hart Lane over Tottenham Hotspur. After heavy cup defeats in early January to Nottingham Forest in the FA Cup and a League Cup loss to Manchester City, there was big pressure on Allardyce from supporters.

16 points out of a possible 21 followed which guided the club away from trouble and West Ham eventually finished 13th but apart from a league double over Tottenham, there weren’t many highlights for the fans to remember.

 

2014-2015

After the general struggle of 2013-2014, West Ham were flying high in the early part of the 2014-2015 season. Liverpool FC and Manchester City were among their victims at Upton Park and the club sat in fourth place going into Christmas. Unfortunately, only another three victories followed against Hull City, Sunderland and Burnley. West Ham slipped to 12th place by the end of the season which was slightly disappointing considering how high they were earlier in the campaign.

Moments after the season concluded with defeat on Tyneside to Newcastle United, the board confirmed Allardyce’s contract would not be renewed and he would leave to take a break from football management. Aaron Cresswell was voted Hammer of the Year after an impressive debut campaign.

 

2015-2016

Former player Slaven Bilic was chosen as the man to lead West Ham through their final season at Upton Park. They began with a marvellous hat-trick of away victories at The Emirates Stadium, Anfield and The Etihad Stadium. A 2-1 victory over Chelsea at the end of October had the Hammers into the top three.

An injury to star player Dimitri Payet in early November started a dreadful run of eight games without a win which dropped the Londoners into the reaches of mid-table. However, a 2-1 victory over Southampton in late December started an excellent second half of the season that took the club onto the cusp of Champions League football. A run of four successive draws ended those aspirations but West Ham finished with 62 points (a new PL best) and finished seventh in the table.

Payet was top scorer in all competitions and football ended at Upton Park with a memorable 3-2 victory over Manchester United. Winston Reid scored the final-ever goal at The Boleyn.

 

2016-2017

West Ham’s first season in their new home at The London Stadium was always going to be tricky and despite a winning start, as Michail Antonio’s header beat AFC Bournemouth, heavy defeats to Watford and Southampton highlighted how hard life would be in their new surroundings.

Dimitri Payet scored a majestic solo goal in a home draw with Middlesbrough but he wouldn’t stick around. In January, he told Slaven Bilic that he wanted to leave and refused to play for the club again. He eventually got his move back to Marseille. West Ham eventually finished in 11th position but with few fireworks on-the-pitch and some heavy beatings to the likes of Manchester City, Arsenal and Liverpool FC.

There was a 1-0 victory right at the end of the campaign against Tottenham Hotspur which effectively ended Spurs’ title aspirations and made the fans very happy.

 

2017-2018

The conclusion of the 2017 IAAF World Athletics Championships meant West Ham couldn’t play any home matches until early September. Despite the arrivals of Joe Hart on-loan, Javier Hernandez and Marko Arnautovic, there was a lack of rhythm. Three straight defeats left them pointless at the end of August.

A Friday night horror show at home to Brighton & Hove Albion in October put the pressure on Bilic and he lost his job a fortnight later with the club languishing in 17th spot. David Moyes was his successor and a 1-0 victory over champions Chelsea in December started an impressive run of form which took the club away from danger.

A 3-0 defeat at home to Burnley in March saw some unsavoury scenes inside the stadium with some fans running onto the pitch and owners David Gold and David Sullivan being asked to leave the directors box for their own safety. It looks like West Ham will stay up this season but testing times seem to lie ahead for one of the Premier League’s regular members.

The Clubs: Wolverhampton Wanderers

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
152 32 40 80 156 281 -125 136 4

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Matt Jarvis 108
Christophe Berra 96
Karl Henry 94
Stephen Ward 94
Kevin Doyle 93
Jody Craddock 81
Richard Stearman 77
Sylvan Ebanks-Blake 76
Kevin Foley 74
Wayne Hennessey 71

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Steven Fletcher 22
Kevin Doyle 18
Matt Jarvis 15
Sylvan Ebanks-Blake 10
Henri Camara 7
Jody Craddock 7
Stephen Hunt 6
Carl Cort 5
David Edwards 5
Jamie O’Hara 5

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Wolverhampton Wanderers 4-0 Blackpool 26th February 2011 2010-2011
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3-1 Leeds United 28th December 2003 2003-2004
West Ham United 1-3 Wolverhampton Wanderers 23rd March 2010 2009-2010
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3-1 West Bromwich Albion 8th May 2011 2010-2011
Sunderland 1-3 Wolverhampton Wanderers 14th May 2011 2010-2011
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3-1 Wigan Athletic 6th November 2011 2011-2012
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2-0 Middlesbrough 17th April 2004 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2-0 Burnley 20th December 2009 2009-2010
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2-0 Fulham 21st August 2011 2011-2012
Wolverhampton Wanderers 4-3 Leicester City 25th October 2003 2003-2004

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-5 Chelsea 20th September 2003 2003-2004
Fulham 5-0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 4th March 2012 2011-2012
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-5 Manchester United 18th March 2012 2011-2012
Blackburn Rovers 5-1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 16th August 2003 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-5 West Bromwich Albion 12th February 2012 2011-2012
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-4 Charlton Athletic 23rd August 2003 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-4 Aston Villa 14th March 2004 2003-2004
Chelsea 4-0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 21st November 2009 2009-2010
Tottenham Hotspur 5-2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 6th December 2003 2003-2004
Chelsea 5-2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 27th March 2004 2003-2004

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Dave Jones 1 1st November 2004
Mick McCarthy 3 13th February 2012
Terry Connor 1 1st July 2012

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-0 Manchester United 17th January 2004 29,396 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2-1 Everton 1st May 2004 29,395 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-3 Arsenal 7th February 2004 29,392 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-2 Tottenham Hotspur 15th May 2004 29,389 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-0 Manchester City 4th October 2003 29,386 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-4 Aston Villa 14th March 2004 29,386 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-1 Liverpool FC 21st January 2004 29,380 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-1 Newcastle United 29th November 2003 29,344 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-5 Chelsea 20th September 2003 29,208 2003-2004
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3-1 Leeds United 28th December 2003 29,139 2003-2004

 

Intro

Wolverhampton Wanderers made their Premier League debut in 2003 and in their first season, enjoyed one of their finest results as champions Manchester United were defeated 1-0 at Molineux. Despite having experienced title winners Paul Ince and Denis Irwin in their squad, Wolves were relegated at the first attempt. Another three-year spell followed under Mick McCarthy’s guidance at the start of this decade and they will return to the top-flight after a six-year absence in time for the 2018-2019 season.

 

2003-2004

Wolverhampton Wanderers enjoyed their first top-flight campaign in 20 years and their maiden adventure under the offices of the FA Premier League in 2003-2004. It was always likely to be a season of struggle for manager Dave Jones and his players and that’s how it transpired. Wolves managed just seven league victories all campaign. However, they did pull off the biggest surprise of the season, when Kenny Miller’s second half strike defeating reigning champions Manchester United in January. However, they failed to win a single match away from Molineux and despite beating Everton 2-1 on the penultimate weekend of the season; other results elsewhere condemned Wolves to the drop. They finished bottom and seven points adrift of safety.

 

2009-2010

After five years back in the Championship, Wolves returned to the Premier League in-time for the 2009-2010 campaign with former Republic of Ireland boss Mick McCarthy now at the helm. There were nine new arrivals including a club-record fee paid to Reading for Kevin Doyle. They won their first away match in Premier League history at Wigan Athletic and sat 12th after just six games. A terrible run of form did follow which saw the club drop into the bottom three and McCarthy attracted criticism for fielding a weakened side at Old Trafford and was fined £25,000. It was worth the financial penalty as Wolves beat Burnley in their very next match.

March was the turning point in the season. A draw with Aston Villa and crucial victories away at Burnley and West Ham United lifted Wolves comfortably away from danger. Their survival was confirmed on 25th April when Burnley lost at home to Liverpool FC, meaning the Clarets had no hope of catching the Midlands club. Although they scored the fewest goals in the season (32) of any side in the Premier League, 38 points were gained and Wolves finished a respectable 15th.

 

2010-2011

Five new additions were made in the summer to Wolves’ squad, including the arrival of long-time target Stephen Hunt from relegated Hull City and the £6.5 million capture of Steven Fletcher, equalling the club’s transfer record. Wolves went unbeaten through August but after losing in injury-time to Fulham, went on a run of five defeats in their next six games. It was clear that it was going to be another season of battling against the drop.

McCarthy’s side would excel in games where they were not expected to get any points. They achieved their first win at Anfield since 1984, beat reigning champions Chelsea at Molineux and ended Manchester United’s 29-match unbeaten sequence with a 2-1 success in February. In fact, Arsenal were the only side in the top six to beat Wolves twice during the campaign.

With three games left, Wanderers were in the drop zone but then recorded crucial back-to-back 3-1 victories over West Bromwich Albion and Sunderland to ensure they started the final round of games outside the relegation placings. They faced Blackburn Rovers on a nail-biting final day but experienced a dreadful first half, losing 3-0 at the interval. As results at the other grounds progressed, a one-goal defeat would be enough to keep Wolves in the top-flight. In the 87th minute, Stephen Hunt delivered an unstoppable shot that flew into the back of the net. Despite losing on the day, Wolves had avoided relegation by the skin of their teeth.

 

2011-2012

There was a positive start to Wolves’ fourth Premier League campaign and for a few hours in the opening fortnight, they actually sat top of the table after two successive victories over Blackburn Rovers and Fulham. That was to be the high of what turned out to be a thoroughly depressing and disappointing campaign.

Wolves set an unwanted club-record of failing to keep a clean sheet in 30 successive league matches and also won just one of their last 24 games. After a 5-1 home humbling by Black Country rivals West Bromwich Albion, Mick McCarthy was sacked in mid-February. Alan Curbishley was offered the job but declined to take over and it was left to McCarthy’s former assistant, Terry Connor to guide the club through the remainder of the season.

It was disastrous. He failed to win any of his 13 league matches in control and a 2-0 home loss to Manchester City consigned Wolves to relegation three games before the end of a frustrating season.

Amazingly, a second successive relegation followed in the Championship but Wolves have fought back and will return to the top-flight in time for the 2018-2019 season.

The Clubs: Everton

All data correct upto 16th April 2018

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
996 360 286 350 1298 1261 +37 1366 26

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Tim Howard 354
Leon Osman 352
Leighton Baines 330
Phil Jagielka 311
David Unsworth 302
Tony Hibbert 265
Phil Neville 242
Duncan Ferguson 239
David Weir 235
Tim Cahill 226

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Romelu Lukaku 68
Duncan Ferguson 60
Tim Cahill 56
Kevin Campbell 45
Leon Osman 44
David Unsworth 33
Leighton Baines 29
Kevin Mirallas 29
Paul Rideout 29
Tony Cottee 28

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Everton 7-1 Southampton 16th November 1996 1996-1997
Everton 7-1 Sunderland 24th November 2007 2007-2008
Everton 6-0 West Ham United 8th May 1999 1998-1999
Everton 5-0 Middlesbrough 17th February 1999 1998-1999
Everton 5-0 Sunderland 26th December 1999 1999-2000
Everton 5-0 West Ham United 29th September 2001 2001-2002
Everton 6-2 Swindon Town 15th January 1994 1993-1994
Everton 6-2 Sunderland 1st November 2015 2015-2016
Everton 5-1 Hull City 7th March 2010 2009-2010
Everton 4-0 Middlesbrough 26th December 1995 1995-1996

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Arsenal 7-0 Everton 11th May 2005 2004-2005
Everton 1-6 Arsenal 15th August 2009 2009-2010
Manchester City 5-0 Everton 9th December 2000 2000-2001
Chelsea 5-0 Everton 5th November 2016 2016-2017
Newcastle United 6-2 Everton 29th March 2002 2001-2002
Everton 1-5 Norwich City 25th September 1993 1993-1994
Sheffield Wednesday 5-1 Everton 2nd April 1994 1993-1994
Manchester United 5-1 Everton 4th December 1999 1999-2000
Manchester City 5-1 Everton 15th May 2004 2003-2004
Arsenal 5-1 Everton 3rd February 2018 2017-2018

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Howard Kendall 2 4th December 1993
Mike Walker 2 5th November 1994
Joe Royle 3 27th March 1997
Howard Kendall 1 10th May 1998
Walter Smith 4 10th March 2002
David Moyes 12 19th May 2013
Roberto Martinez 3 12th May 2016
Ronald Koeman 2 23rd October 2017
Sam Allardyce 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Everton 1-0 Liverpool FC 11th December 2004 40,552 2004-2005
Everton 2-1 Manchester City 26th December 2004 40,530 2004-2005
Everton 0-2 Manchester United 27th August 1997 40,479 1997-1998
Everton 2-0 Newcastle United 7th May 2005 40,438 2004-2005
Everton 0-1 Chelsea 12th February 2005 40,270 2004-2005
Everton 2-3 Liverpool FC 16th April 2001 40,260 2000-2001
Everton 2-2 Newcastle United 16th September 2003 40,228 2003-2004
Everton 0-3 Liverpool FC 30th August 2003 40,200 2003-2004
Everton 2-0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 22nd November 2003 40,190 2003-2004
Everton 3-4 Manchester United 7th February 2004 40,190 2003-2004

 

Intro

Everton are one of only six teams to have been a Premier League ever-present and when they play on the final day of the 2017-2018 season, they will reach 1000 Premier League games. The Toffees have endured a rollercoaster ride for their supporters. Final day escapes from relegation in 1994 and 1998 mixed in with a highest finish of fourth place under David Moyes’ stable time at the club in 2005. Sam Allardyce is the current boss and the former England manager has guided them to safety after a rocky start to the current campaign.

 

1992-1993

Everton recorded their lowest league finish in over a decade as they never made any telling impact in the inaugural Premier League season. They finished only 13th and just four points clear of the relegation zone. A 2-1 Merseyside Derby victory at Goodison Park in December with Peter Beardsley scoring the winner was the main highlight of the season for the supporters.

 

1993-1994

Victories over Southampton, Manchester City and Sheffield United took Everton briefly top of the table after three matches. The spark had fizzled out though for Howard Kendall and he ended his second spell at his beloved Goodison in early December after just one victory in eight games.

He was replaced by Norwich City boss Mike Walker but he couldn’t stop the slide. Just one win in 10 matches saw Everton start the final day of the season in the bottom three. Things looked grim at home to Wimbledon when they trailed 2-0 after 20 minutes. Two goals from Graham Stuart and a Barry Horne blockbuster saw the Toffees rescue the match and their season. Results elsewhere meant Everton avoid relegation…just. They finished 17th but it was much closer than any fan would have liked.

 

1994-1995

The Merseysiders made their worst-ever start to a season, failing to win any of their first 12 games. Despite a 1-0 win over West Ham United in early November, the board ran out of patience with Mike Walker. Days after a goalless draw at former club Norwich, he was sacked and replaced by former goalscoring great Joe Royle – who ended his long association with Oldham Athletic in the process.

The squad looked like a bunch of broken men but Royle fixed things quickly with his ‘Dogs of War’ approach. Clean sheets were kept in five successive matches and victories over Liverpool FC, Chelsea and Leeds United took Everton out of the bottom four. Champions Manchester United were beaten in late February by a towering Duncan Ferguson header and survival was clinched in the club’s penultimate match of the season when a scrappy Paul Rideout effort defeated Ipswich Town.

Rideout would provide the silver lining to the season too with his winner in the FA Cup final against Manchester United. European football would return to Goodison Park for the first time since the Heysel disaster of 1985 which had seen a blanket ban on English clubs competing in Europe.

 

1995-1996

Royle and Everton built on their excellent end to the previous season, finishing sixth and just two points shy of a top four finish. This was despite losing star striker Duncan Ferguson for just over a month after he was sentenced to a spell in jail for head-butting an opponent during his time with Rangers in Scottish football. Andrei Kanchelskis starred with 16 goals in his first season on Merseyside.

 

1996-1997

Everton finished 19 points off their 1995-1996 tally and nine places lower too after a difficult season which saw Joe Royle resign as first-team manager at the end of March. Captain Dave Watson steered the club to safety but there were few highs. Kanchelskis was sold to Fiorentina during the campaign but Everton did record their joint-biggest Premier League victory, thumping Southampton 7-1 in November.

 

1997-1998

Howard Kendall returned for a third spell as manager after preferred target Andy Gray elected to extend his contract with Sky Sports. However, financial problems were growing and the fans’ frustration at owner Peter Johnson’s lack of investment meant Kendall would be in for the toughest season of his managerial career.

Like 1994, Everton went into the final day of the season in the drop zone. A 1-1 draw at home to Coventry City was enough to ensure their safety on goal difference from Bolton Wanderers. There was great joy and relief on the pitch at the final whistle but Kendall wouldn’t be staying. He resigned and would be replaced in the off-season by Walter Smith.

 

1998-1999

Peter Johnson’s tumultuous reign as Everton chairman ended in December, quitting after a row with Walter Smith over the controversial sale of Duncan Ferguson to Newcastle United for £7 million. Smith had enjoyed plenty of success in Scotland with Rangers but couldn’t replicate that in his first season at the helm in England. Everton finished 14th and only the goals of on-loan signing Kevin Campbell in the season’s closing weeks avoided another huge scrap with relegation.

 

1999-2000

Smith’s second season as Everton manager was better and the Toffees spent much of the campaign in the top half of the table. However, a final day home defeat to Middlesbrough saw them finish a slightly underwhelming 13th. Campbell signed permanently and was top scorer with 12 goals and Everton finished with a positive goal difference thanks to huge margin wins over Sunderland and West Ham United.

 

2000-2001

Paul Gascoigne joined the Everton ranks but he was past his best and Everton endured another poor season. They finished a tame 16th in the table, eight points clear of the bottom three. The fans continued to feel frustrated by the lack of progress but Duncan Ferguson did return to the club after 18 months at Newcastle, scoring twice on his home debut return against Charlton Athletic.

 

2001-2002

Two wins and a draw saw Everton top of the table in August but Walter Smith managed just five more victories from the next 26 games. After a calamitous quarter-final exit to Middlesbrough in the FA Cup, the board sacked the manager in March. He was replaced by Preston North End boss David Moyes. He managed four victories from his nine games to keep the club clear of any relegation danger. They ended 15th.

 

2002-2003

2002-2003 was Everton’s 100th season in the top division, becoming the first club to achieve this feat. It was also the season that saw Wayne Rooney make his huge breakthrough, becoming an England debutant by the end of it. Rooney scored a brilliant late goal to end Arsenal’s 30-match unbeaten league run in October and David Moyes’ side were a challenger for the Champions League positions. Three losses in their last four games meant they missed out on European football altogether but a 7th placed finish was seen as major progress for the supporters after years toiling at the wrong end of the table.

 

2003-2004

After all the promise of the previous season, it looked like it might be a false dawn again. Everton mustered just nine victories and a final day 5-1 mauling at the hands of Manchester City saw the Toffees finish a dreadful 17th in the table, just six points clear of relegated trio, Leicester City, Leeds United and Wolverhampton Wanderers.

 

2004-2005

Many pundits tipped Everton for relegation in pre-season and a boardroom battle between Bill Kenwright and Phillip Carter raged throughout the summer. Marcus Bent was the only close-season arrival whilst the likes of David Unsworth, Steve Watson, Tomasz Radzinski and boy wonder Wayne Rooney all departed.

The Toffees lost 4-1 on the opening weekend at home to Arsenal but a siege mentality resolve gathered over the club and they completely defied expectations all season. Despite selling Thomas Gravesen to Real Madrid in the January transfer window, Everton secured a Champions League qualification spot, finishing fourth with 61 points. It meant they finished above Liverpool FC for the first time in the Premier League Years. Tim Cahill was the Player of the Season, scoring 11 times in his debut campaign at this level.

 

2005-2006

Eight matches into the 2005-2006 season and Everton were propping up the table, with just three points and seven defeats. A 1-1 draw with runaway league leaders Chelsea saw a revival in fortunes but back-to-back 4-0 losses over Christmas by Bolton Wanderers and Aston Villa ensured Everton went into 2006 in the bottom three.

The fans needn’t have worried. Everton lost just four games in the second half of the season and rallied to finish in 11th place but struggled for goals all season. They hit the back of the net just 34 times in 38 matches.

 

2006-2007

In an attempt to solve the goalscoring conundrum, David Moyes signed Andy Johnson from Crystal Palace in the summer and Johnson produced a solid 11-goal return. Everton showed much better consistency and there was an enjoyable 3-0 home victory in the Merseyside Derby in September. Everton finished in sixth place – which ensured qualification for next season’s UEFA Cup.

 

2007-2008

David Moyes’ reputation as one of the finest managers in England continued as Everton amassed 65 points and finished fifth in the table. In fact, they were fourth in the table with 10 games left to play but arch-rivals Liverpool FC’s late surge in form saw them overtake their neighbours before the season’s end. Yakubu enjoyed a prolific first season at Everton, scoring 15 Premier League goals whilst Sunderland were destroyed 7-1 in November which is the club’s joint-biggest Premier League victory.

 

2008-2009

Despite limits on resources, Everton broke their transfer record in late August to acquire the talents of Marouane Fellaini from Standard Liege for £15 million. A difficult start to their home form meant Everton didn’t launch a top-four challenge. Louis Saha’s late winner over Fulham in November galvanised their domestic season. Everton finished fifth for the second successive season.

 

2009-2010

Many key players were missing from Everton’s line-up in the first half of the season, with the likes of Mikel Arteta, Phil Jagielka and Yakubu missing due to long-term injuries. This played a part in a tricky start to the season. Everton were just 16th at Christmas and only two points clear of relegation danger.

However, they were one of the form sides in the second half of the season, losing just two of their last 24 matches. This included impressive victories over Chelsea and Manchester United. Everton finished in eighth place. Their slow start ensured European football would elude them for the following season.

 

2010-2011

Traditional slow starters Everton failed to win a top-flight game until early October when they beat Birmingham City 2-0. There was a memorable Derby victory over Liverpool FC and a fourth successive victory at Eastlands against Manchester City but these were three of just four victories in the first half of the season. Again, form improved after Christmas with just two losses from their last 12 matches to ensure a final finishing position of seventh.

 

2011-2012

Everton’s Premier League campaign was delayed by a week due to the London riots forcing a postponement of their scheduled starting match at Tottenham Hotspur. Again, they made a slow start but a nine-game unbeaten sequence at the end of the season ensured back-to-back seventh place finishes. Even better for the supporters was the rarity of finishing above Liverpool FC in the final standings, even though the Reds won both Merseyside Derby encounters. The winter arrival of Nikica Jelavic boosted the team and he scored nine times, including twice in a 4-4 draw at Old Trafford in April.

 

2012-2013

2012-2013 was a very consistent season for Everton, who began with a tremendous 1-0 victory over Manchester United with an inspired display from Marouane Fellaini. Two stoppage-time goals defeated Tottenham Hotspur in December and reigning champions Manchester City were beaten 2-0 in March. Everton finished in sixth position and above Liverpool in the table for the second successive season.

However, too many draws and a horrible display in the FA Cup quarter-finals which saw them lose 3-0 to Wigan Athletic saw many supporters disappointed. On 9th May, David Moyes confirmed he would be leaving after 11 years at the helm as manager. He was taking the vacancy being created by Sir Alex Ferguson’s retirement at Manchester United.

 

2013-2014

For the first time since 2002, Everton started a Premier League campaign without David Moyes as their manager. Roberto Martinez filled the vacancy and believed Everton could qualify for the UEFA Champions League within three years. They nearly achieved it in his successful first season. Everton finished with their highest points tally (72) and a fifth-place finish.

Martinez inspired Everton to their best sequence of results in their Premier League history with a run of seven successive victories before a 3-2 home loss to Crystal Palace which meant their chances of beating Arsenal to fourth place all but disappeared. There was a joyous league double over Manchester United and a home success over Chelsea too. Romelu Lukaku made an immediate mark in his debut season as an Everton player. On-loan from Chelsea, Lukaku finished with 15 goals and would join permanently in the summer.

 

2014-2015

After all the promise and excitement of Martinez’s debut campaign, Everton showed a huge degree of inconsistency in 2014-2015. By the end of the calendar year, they had the second worst defensive record in the league and had made the most individual errors resulting in goals in Europe’s top five leagues. The Toffees finished in a disappointing 11th place and a massive 25 points off their final 2013-2014 tally.

 

2015-2016

Despite reaching the semi-finals of both domestic cup competitions, league form again failed to sparkle for Everton. There were some better results. Steven Naismith came off the bench to score a hat-trick in an early season 3-1 victory over champions Chelsea and Arouna Kone also recorded a treble in a 6-2 beating of Sunderland in November.

Too many draws and a dreadful home record blighted Everton’s challenge for a top six finish. After the Sunderland victory, just four more home triumphs were recorded and 55 goals were leaked as mistakes from the previous season weren’t learned from.

A Merseyside Derby mauling at Anfield in April really cranked up the pressure on Martinez and after a similar kind of display in a 3-0 loss to Sunderland, Bill Kenwright had little option but to sack him before the final game of the season. For the second successive campaign, Everton finished only 11th.

 

2016-2017

Ronald Koeman was chosen as Martinez’s successor as he left Southampton and Everton made some radical improvements to finish seventh and a whopping 15 points clear of the rest of the pack. Unfortunately, they were eight points shy of sixth-placed Manchester United which meant they were almost in their own division.

Lukaku became the club’s highest all-time Premier League top goalscorer and finished with 25 goals, only denied the Golden Boot by a final week masterclass from Tottenham’s Harry Kane, who scored eight times in his last three matches. In fact, Everton never relinquished seventh place in the table after a Boxing Day victory at outgoing champions Leicester City.

 

2017-2018

Money was thrown at a real push for the top four positions with Jordan Pickford, Michael Keane and Gylfi Sigurdsson among the new arrivals. There was also an emotional return for Wayne Rooney, who returned to the club in a deal which saw Romelu Lukaku depart in the other direction for Manchester United.

Rooney began well with the winner at home to Stoke City on the opening day, followed by his 200th Premier League strike in a draw with Manchester City. Two months later though, Ronald Koeman was out of a job. Everton won just two matches in their first nine games and slipped into the bottom three after a 5-2 humbling by Arsenal at Goodison Park. Kenwright axed Koeman 24 hours later.

After David Unsworth filled the position for a month in an interim spell and a prolonged chase for Marco Silva failed, the Toffees abandoned their ambitious approach and went back to basics. Sam Allardyce arrived at the helm and guided Everton away from any relegation danger. With four games left, they sit ninth in the table but a string of turgid displays away from Merseyside has left supporters unhappy. It remains unclear if Allardyce will start next season as the club’s manager.

The Clubs: Stoke City

All data correct upto 9th April 2018

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
375 115 106 154 393 520 -127 451 10

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Ryan Shawcross 312
Glenn Whelan 277
Jon Walters 226
Peter Crouch 197
Geoff Cameron 167
Erik Pieters 164
Asmir Begovic 160
Matthew Etherington 152
Robert Huth 149
Marc Wilson 146

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Peter Crouch 43
Jon Walters 43
Mame Biram Diouf 23
Marko Arnautovic 22
Charlie Adam 19
Ricardo Fuller 18
Ryan Shawcross 14
Xherdan Shaqiri 14
Bojan 14
Matthew Etherington 13

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Stoke City 6-1 Liverpool FC 24th May 2015 2014-2015
Stoke City 4-0 Newcastle United 19th March 2011 2010-2011
Aston Villa 1-4 Stoke City 23rd March 2014 2013-2014
Stoke City 4-1 Fulham 3rd May 2014 2013-2014
Stoke City 3-0 Blackburn Rovers 6th February 2010 2009-2010
West Bromwich Albion 0-3 Stoke City 20th November 2010 2010-2011
Stoke City 3-0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 26th April 2011 2010-2011
Stoke City 3-1 Arsenal 8th May 2011 2010-2011
Stoke City 3-1 Blackburn Rovers 26th November 2011 2011-2012
Stoke City 3-1 Liverpool FC 26th December 2012 2012-2013

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Chelsea 7-0 Stoke City 25th April 2010 2009-2010
Manchester City 7-2 Stoke City 14th October 2017 2017-2018
Manchester United 5-0 Stoke City 15th November 2008 2008-2009
Bolton Wanderers 5-0 Stoke City 6th November 2011 2010-2011
Chelsea 5-0 Stoke City 30th December 2017 2017-2018
Newcastle United 5-1 Stoke City 26th December 2013 2013-2014
Tottenham Hotspur 5-1 Stoke City 9th December 2017 2017-2018
Liverpool FC 4-0 Stoke City 19th August 2009 2009-2010
Manchester United 4-0 Stoke City 9th May 2010 2009-2010
Sunderland 4-0 Stoke City 18th September 2011 2011-2012

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Tony Pulis 5 21st May 2013
Mark Hughes 5 6th January 2018
Paul Lambert 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Stoke City 1-2 Everton 17th March 2018 30,022 2017-2018
Stoke City 1-1 Brighton & Hove Albion 10th February 2018 29,876 2017-2018
Stoke City 2-0 Huddersfield Town 20th January 2018 29,785 2017-2018
Stoke City 0-4 Chelsea 23rd September 2017 29,661 2017-2018
Stoke City 2-2 Leicester City 4th November 2017 29,602 2017-2018
Stoke City 1-2 Tottenham Hotspur 7th April 2018 29,515 2017-2018
Stoke City 1-2 AFC Bournemouth 21st October 2017 29,500 2017-2018
Stoke City 1-0 Arsenal 19th August 2017 29,459 2017-2018
Stoke City 0-3 Liverpool FC 29th November 2017 29,423 2017-2018
Stoke City 2-2 Manchester United 9th September 2017 29,320 2017-2018

 

Intro

Stoke City have been a consistent part of the Premier League for the last decade. Promoted in 2008, they managed three successive top 10 finishes during Mark Hughes’ largely successful stint in-charge of the club. Their physical approach to the game hasn’t won many friends, especially Arsene Wenger but it has won them many matches and plenty of points. However with just five games left in 2017-2018, their Premier League position is in severe jeopardy, sitting four points away from safety with Paul Lambert attempting to steer them clear of the drop.

 

2008-2009

Stoke City were tipped to go straight back down by the media after their promotion to the Premier League but Tony Pulis would defy the critics in their first season in the top-flight as they finished in a comfortable 12th place.

Rory Delap’s long throw-ins caused problems for many teams over the season and the likes of Aston Villa, Tottenham Hotspur and Arsenal were all beaten at The Britannia Stadium in the first four months of the campaign. Despite a poor December which saw the Potters drop into the drop zone, Pulis made good use of the January transfer window. He bought James Beattie and Matthew Etherington and both signings made a great impact.

Beattie scored the only goal as Stoke ended a run of nine matches without a win at the end of January against Manchester City and further important victories away at West Bromwich Albion and Hull City ensured their survival two games before the end of the season.

 

2009-2010

After a successful first season in the Premier League, Pulis splashed £20 million on new acquisitions with the Middlesbrough duo of Tuncay and Robert Huth among the arrivals. A fabulous 1-0 away victory at White Hart Lane over Tottenham Hotspur was the highlight of the first half of the campaign and an excellent 11-match unbeaten run at the start of 2010 ensured Stoke were under no threat of relegation. They finished 11th, one place and two points better than the previous campaign.

The only sour note was a home defeat to Arsenal which saw Ryan Shawcross criticised massively for a terrible tackle on Arsenal’s Aaron Ramsey that left the Welshman with a double leg fracture.

 

2010-2011

It was a slow start to the 2010-2011 season as Stoke City went through August pointless and winless. A late 2-1 victory over Aston Villa in mid-September effectively kick-started their season and it would ultimately be another campaign in the realms of mid-table. Once again, they achieved 40+ points, although they finished 13th in the final standings – slightly lower than the 2009-2010 finishing position.

It was a historic season though as the Potters reached the FA Cup final, losing the showpiece event 1-0 to Manchester City. However, City’s involvement in the UEFA Champions League through their league position ensured Stoke would get a taste of UEFA Europa League football for the following season.

 

2011-2012

Stoke’s first excursion into European football for the first time since 1975 was a main talking point leading up to the 2011-2012 season. Pulis managed to entice the likes of Cameron Jerome, Wilson Palacios and Peter Crouch to the club in the summer and Stoke made it out of the group stages, before bowing out to Spanish giants Valencia in the round-of-32.

In the league, eight points from their first four games hinted at an improvement but the extra demand of European fixtures took its toll on the squad. Stoke won just four league matches after Christmas and finished in their lowest Premier League position of 14th, though still a comfortable nine points clear of the relegation zone.

 

2012-2013

Stoke City’s 150th year of existence would be a disappointing season and would ultimately spell the end of Tony Pulis’ reign as manager. Just one win in their first 10 matches set the tone for a lacklustre campaign which saw the club score just 34 goals in 38 matches. Only relegated Queens Park Rangers scored fewer.

A 3-1 Boxing Day victory over Liverpool FC was a standout result but just nine wins were recorded all term and a relegation battle looked like a distinct possibility after a dismal 3-1 home defeat to Aston Villa in early April. Back-to-back late season wins over Queens Park Rangers and Norwich City ensured their survival but owner Peter Coates decided a change was needed in the managerial helm.

Two days after the season ended, Pulis parted company with the club by mutual consent after seven successful seasons and was replaced by the former Blackburn Rovers and Fulham manager, Mark Hughes.

 

2013-2014

On his arrival in the summer of 2013, Mark Hughes was keen to change Stoke’s style of play and attempt to play a more possession-based style. Initially, it took time for the players to adapt to his way of thinking and Stoke spent most of the first part of the season just outside the relegation positions.

A 2-1 victory over Manchester United in early February, thanks to a brilliant performance from Charlie Adam spearheaded a revival in fortunes. This included a run of four successive victories in March. Stoke finished in the top 10 for the first time in their Premier League history. They finished in ninth position with 50 points. It was their best top-flight finish since 1975.

 

2014-2015

Hughes enjoyed a brilliant early season result as new signing Mame Biram Diouf scored the only goal in a 1-0 away victory at champions Manchester City. Despite disappointing home defeats to newly-promoted Burnley and Leicester City, Stoke looked set for another top 10 finish and equalled their 9th place finish from 2013-2014. However, they improved their points tally to 54.

This included a 3-0 whitewash of Tottenham Hotspur followed by the club’s biggest-ever Premier League victory on the final day of the season, as Liverpool FC were dismantled 6-1. Diouf impressed in his debut season with Stoke, finishing as top goalscorer with 11 goals.

 

2015-2016

Long-serving trio Asmir Begovic, Steven N’Zonzi and Robert Huth all left the club in the summer and with the funds from these departures, Hughes broke the club’s transfer record to tempt Swiss playmaker Xherdan Shaqiri away from Inter Milan for £12 million. Hopes were high with supporters to try and break into the Premier League’s top eight but it didn’t quite happen.

Despite some great results, including a 2-0 Boxing Day triumph over Manchester United and a thrilling 4-3 win over Everton, some charitable defending saw Hughes’ side suffer some heavy defeats in the closing weeks, including a triple spurt of 4-1/4-0 defeats to Liverpool FC, Tottenham Hotspur and Manchester City.

It was another 9th place finish but they did finish one point ahead of reigning champions Chelsea.

 

2016-2017

Stoke City had finished the 2015-2016 season in poor form and that continued into the 2016-2017 season. 15 goals were conceded in the opening six matches and Stoke collected just two points in this period.

A 1-1 draw at Old Trafford against Manchester United started to take the Staffordshire side away from danger as they lost just one out of their next eight matches. However, their season never really hit any sparkle and for the first time under Hughes’ management, Stoke finished in the bottom half in 13th place. Murmurs around the newly-titled bet365 Stadium were beginning to sound out about the lack of progress under the Welshman.

 

2017-2018

The sale of star player Marko Arnautovic to West Ham United in pre-season raised further concerns with the supporters but a 1-0 home win against Arsenal initially calmed any early frustrations. They were also the first team to take points off Manchester United with two goals from new signing, Eric Maxim Choupo-Moting. However, their defensive problems returned and the Potters suffered heavy losses to Manchester City (7-2), Tottenham Hotspur (5-1), Chelsea (5-0) and West Ham United (3-0).

After a shock loss in the FA Cup third round to Coventry City, Hughes’ contract was terminated to the delight of many supporters. He was replaced by former Norwich City and Aston Villa boss Paul Lambert. Lambert started with a 2-0 home win over Huddersfield Town but Stoke haven’t won since and with five games remaining, sit four points adrift of safety. Their Premier League status looks to be in severe jeopardy.

The Clubs: Reading

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
114 32 23 591 136 186 -50 119 3

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Nicky Shorey 90
Marcus Hahnemann 76
James Harper 76
Ivar Ingimarsson 73
Stephen Hunt 72
Kevin Doyle 68
Graeme Murty 51
Shane Long 50
Dave Kitson 47
Leroy Lita 47

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Kevin Doyle 19
Dave Kitson 12
Adam Le Fondre 12
James Harper 9
Stephen Hunt 9
Leroy Lita 8
Hal Robson-Kanu 7
Jimmy Kebe 5
Shane Long 5
Pavel Pogrebnyak 5

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Reading 6-0 West Ham United 1st January 2007 2006-2007
Derby County 0-4 Reading 11th May 2008 2007-2008
Fulham 2-4 Reading 4th May 2013 2012-2013
Reading 3-1 Tottenham Hotspur 12th November 2006 2006-2007
Reading 3-1 Sheffield United 20th January 2007 2006-2007
Bolton Wanderers 1-3 Reading 21st April 2007 2006-2007
Reading 3-1 Liverpool FC 8th December 2007 2007-2008
Reading 2-0 Charlton Athletic 18th November 2006 2006-2007
Manchester City 0-2 Reading 3rd February 2007 2006-2007
Reading 2-0 Aston Villa 10th February 2007 2006-2007

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Reading 0-4 Arsenal 22nd October 2006 2006-2007
Portsmouth 7-4 Reading 29th September 2007 2007-2008
Reading 2-5 Arsenal 17th December 2012 2012-2013
Arsenal 4-1 Reading 30th March 2013 2012-2013
Bolton Wanderers 3-0 Reading 25th August 2007 2007-2008
Reading 0-3 West Ham United 1st September 2007 2007-2008
Newcastle United 3-0 Reading 5th April 2008 2007-2008
Sunderland 3-0 Reading 11th December 2012 2012-2013
Reading 0-3 Wigan Athletic 23rd February 2013 2012-2013
Tottenham Hotspur 6-4 Reading 29th December 2007 2007-2008

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Steve Coppell 2 12th May 2009
Brian McDermott 1 11th March 2013
Nigel Adkins 1 15th December 2014

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Reading 0-0 Blackburn Rovers 29th March 2008 24,374 2007-2008
Reading 2-1 Everton 17th November 2012 24,184 2012-2013
Reading 1-0 West Ham United 29th December 2012 24,183 2012-2013
Reading 1-3 Tottenham Hotspur 16th September 2012 24,160 2012-2013
Reading 0-0 Liverpool FC 13th April 2013 24,139 2012-2013
Reading 0-2 Manchester United 19th January 2008 24,135 2007-2008
Reading 0-1 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd May 2008 24,125 2007-2008
Reading 2-5 Arsenal 17th December 2012 24,125 2012-2013
Reading 2-0 Aston Villa 10th February 2007 24,122 2006-2007
Reading 1-2 Liverpool FC 7th April 2007 24,121 2006-2007

 

Intro

Reading enjoyed a lively start to their Premier League career and surprised many in their debut campaign. Rather than fight relegation, Steve Coppell’s energetic Royals were in the shake-up for European qualifying positions until the final day of the season and finished a fabulous eighth in the table. Their next two seasons in the top-flight were more of the anticipated struggle which ended with the heartache of relegation but Reading will hope to be back in the future with recently newly-appointed boss, Paul Clement.

 

2006-2007

Reading made an electrifying start to their Premier League life by coming from two goals down to beat Middlesbrough 3-2. It would start the trend for an outstanding debut season in the top-flight. Manchester United were held 1-1 in September, Tottenham Hotspur beaten 3-1 in November and West Ham United humiliated 6-0 on New Years’ Day which remains the Royals biggest-ever Premier League win.

Two Steve Sidwell goals against Aston Villa in February took Reading into the dizzy heights of sixth in the table. By early May, there were real hopes of a debut campaign in Europe but a shocking 2-0 home loss to already relegated Watford ended those hopes. Nevertheless, Reading finished a brilliant eighth in the table, ahead of the likes of Aston Villa, Newcastle United and Manchester City in the final standings.

 

2007-2008

Hopes were high for Reading to build on their excellent debut Premier League campaign and a hard-fought goalless draw on the opening weekend at Old Trafford suggested another promising season ahead. However, a leaky defensive line would ruin those hopes. Reading lost 7-4 at Portsmouth, 6-4 to Tottenham Hotspur and 4-2 against Blackburn Rovers.

The high point of the season was a 3-1 success over Liverpool FC in December which was the first time the Reds lost domestically in the season. However, the team suffered an extremely poor run of form at the start of 2008. A club-record was equalled of eight successive defeats which plunged Reading into the bottom three.

Consecutive victories over Middlesbrough and Manchester City propelled Coppell’s side upto 13th in the table but they managed just one more victory before the final day of the season. On the last Sunday, the Berkshire club thrashed hapless Derby County 4-0 but Fulham’s away victory at Portsmouth ensured their safety and condemned Reading to relegation. Despite scoring more goals than the likes of Wigan Athletic, Sunderland and Bolton Wanderers who all survived, Reading’s brittle defensive line, conceding 66 goals would turn out to be their ultimate downfall.

 

2012-2013

After a four-year absence, the Royals returned to the Premier League spotlight as champions of the Championship. They began the season with a late draw at home to Stoke City but there would be no Premier League victory until mid-November when Everton were defeated 2-1. A run of four wins in six games just after the festive period brightened the hopes of potential salvation and it was a run that earned Brian McDermott Manager of the Month honours for January.

They were helped by the goals of Adam Le Fondre, who often came off the substitute’s bench to make a crucial difference. This included two goals to earn a victory at St James’ Park and another late double to earn a 2-2 draw with reigning European champions Chelsea. Le Fondre ended with 12 league goals at the end of the season.

McDermott was sacked in mid-March after successive home losses to relegation rivals Wigan Athletic and Aston Villa. Ex-Southampton boss Nigel Adkins succeeded him but the damage had already been done and a goalless draw at home to Queens Park Rangers at the end of April saw both clubs relegated to the Championship.

The Clubs: Swansea City

All data correct upto 3rd April 2018

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
258 82 64 112 303 369 -66 310 7

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Wayne Routledge 196
Ashley Williams 181
Angel Rangel 168
Nathan Dyer 158
Leon Britton 148
Lukasz Fabianski 142
Ki Sung-Yeung 133
Neil Taylor 131
Gylfi Sigurdsson 124
Federico Fernandez 112

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Gylfi Sigurdsson 34
Wilfried Bony 27
Michu 20
Nathan Dyer 17
Wayne Routledge 16
Danny Graham 15
Fernando Llorente 15
Bafetimbi Gomis 13
Andre Ayew 12
Ki Sung-Yeung 12

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Queens Park Rangers 0-5 Swansea City 18th August 2012 2012-2013
Swansea City 4-0 Sunderland 19th October 2013 2013-2014
Swansea City 4-1 Queens Park Rangers 9th February 2013 2012-2013
Swansea City 4-1 Aston Villa 26th April 2014 2013-2014
West Ham United 1-4 Swansea City 7th May 2016 2015-2016
Swansea City 4-1 West Ham United 3rd March 2018 2017-2018
Swansea City 3-0 West Bromwich Albion 17th September 2011 2011-2012
Fulham 0-3 Swansea City 17th March 2012 2011-2012
Swansea City 3-0 Blackburn Rovers 14th April 2012 2011-2012
Swansea City 3-0 West Ham United 25th August 2012 2012-2013

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Liverpool FC 5-0 Swansea City 17th February 2013 2012-2013
Swansea City 0-5 Chelsea 17th January 2015 2014-2015
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 Swansea City 3rd December 2016 2016-2017
Liverpool FC 5-0 Swansea City 26th December 2017 2017-2018
Manchester City 4-0 Swansea City 15th August 2011 2011-2012
Leicester City 4-0 Swansea City 24th April 2016 2015-2016
Swansea City 0-4 Arsenal 14th January 2017 2016-2017
Swansea City 0-4 Manchester United 19th August 2017 2017-2018
Swansea City 0-4 Manchester City 13th December 2017 2017-2018
Chelsea 4-1 Swansea City 24th September 2011 2011-2012

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Brendan Rodgers 1 1st June 2012
Michael Laudrup 2 4th February 2014
Garry Monk 3 9th December 2015
Francesco Guidolin 2 3rd October 2016
Bob Bradley 1 27th December 2016
Paul Clement 2 20th December 2017
Carlos Carvalhal 1  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Swansea City 0-0 Southampton 20th April 2013 22,561 2012-2013
Swansea City 3-1 Liverpool FC 1st May 2016 20,972 2015-2016
Swansea City 1-0 Chelsea 9th April 2016 20,966 2015-2016
Swansea City 1-3 Manchester United 6th November 2016 20,938 2016-2017
Swansea City 0-3 Arsenal 31st October 2015 20,937 2015-2016
Swansea City 1-1 Manchester City 15th May 2016 20,934 2015-2016
Swansea City 1-0 Norwich City 5th March 2016 20,929 2015-2016
Swansea City 0-1 Southampton 13th February 2016 20,890 2015-2016
Swansea City 2-1 West Bromwich Albion 21st May 2017 20,889 2016-2017
Swansea City 1-0 Liverpool FC 22nd January 2018 20,886 2017-2018

 

Intro

Swansea City became the first Welsh club to play in the Premier League when Brendan Rodgers guided them into the top-flight in 2011. The Swans have been a fixture in the Premier League ever since and achieved a top half finish in 2012-2013 and 2014-2015 under the guidance of Michael Laudrup and Garry Monk. American investment has led to some chaotic moments in the last couple of seasons but under Carlos Carvalhal, the south Wales club look set to extend their Premier League stay to an eighth successive campaign.

 

2011-2012

Swansea City became the first Welsh club to play in the Premier League and found the going tough initially; failing to score or win any of their first four matches. However, a 3-0 victory over West Bromwich Albion in September was the galvanising result that lifted their season. Brendan Rodgers’ side played expansive, attacking football throughout the season using a 4-3-3 formation. Arsenal, Liverpool FC and champions Manchester City were among the sides beaten at The Liberty Stadium.

The Swans also scored the fastest goal of the season, as Andrea Orlandi netted after just 24 seconds in a fixture against Wolverhampton Wanderers which ended in a 4-4 draw. Swansea were never under any serious relegation threat and finished a tremendous 11th in their debut Premier League season. However, they lost their manager in the summer as Rodgers left to fill the vacancy at Liverpool.

 

2012-2013

It was another successful season for Swansea who had a new manager with Michael Laudrup succeeding the departing Rodgers. The club celebrated its centenary, and to mark the occasion released a new crest. In keeping with the centenary theme, the home kit for the season used the colours white and gold, rather than the more traditional white and black.

There was trophy success in the League Cup and a top 10 finish in the Premier League, despite with one fewer point than they amassed in 2011-2012. With 18 goals, new summer acquisition Michu was one of the surprises of the season and the best results came on the road. A 5-0 opening day success at Loftus Road over Queens Park Rangers remains Swansea’s biggest Premier League victory, whilst two Michu goals sank Arsenal at The Emirates Stadium in early December.

 

2013-2014

Swansea broke their transfer record in the summer, paying Vitesse Arnhem £12 million for the services of Ivorian forward Wilfried Bony. Bony was the star turn in a frustrating third campaign at this level for the Swansea faithful. He scored 16 Premier League goals which ultimately kept the team away from relegation trouble.

That didn’t look so secure in early February and after a 2-0 loss at West Ham which was their sixth Premier League reverse in eight games; owner Huw Jenkins sacked Michael Laudrup with the club just two points above the drop zone. Former skipper Garry Monk took over on an interim basis and was given the job permanently in May after securing safety with the Swans ultimately finishing 12th.

This was the only season the Welsh Derby took place in the Premier League. Swansea won 3-0 in February in Monk’s first game in-charge to make amends for the 1-0 loss they suffered to Cardiff City in November.

 

2014-2015

2014-2015 remains Swansea’s best season, both in terms of finishing position and points tally. They finished in eighth position, amassing 56 points and they never dropped outside of the top 10 throughout the season. In his first full season as a manager, Garry Monk was a revelation as his side recorded some amazing results.

This included league doubles over both Arsenal and Manchester United, whilst Bony scored nine further Premier League goals before he moved to Manchester City in the January transfer window. There was a heavy 5-0 loss at home to champions Chelsea in January but this was a blot in an impressive campaign which saw cracking performances from the likes of Jonjo Shelvey, Lukasz Fabianski and returnee Gylfi Sigurdsson.

 

2015-2016

Swansea went through the first month of the 2015-2016 Premier League campaign undefeated with two wins and two draws. Among those results was an opening day draw at Stamford Bridge against Chelsea and a third successive victory over Manchester United.

However, it all started to unravel from September onwards. A run of one victory in 11 games followed which saw Swansea drop from fourth to 15th in the table. After a lifeless display at home to Leicester City which ended in a 3-0 defeat, the club made the difficult decision to sack Monk. He was replaced a month later by the former Udinese coach Francesco Guidolin. He guided Swansea away from danger and they finished 12th, with late season victories at home to Chelsea and Liverpool FC among the highlights.

 

2016-2017

This was a chaotic season for Swansea City which nearly cost them their Premier League status. Guidolin started the campaign as manager but was sacked in early October after a 2-1 loss to Liverpool FC. Swansea had just four points on the board when he was dismissed. American boss Bob Bradley succeeded him but his reign was even worse and he was axed after a Boxing Day beating at home to West Ham United.

Swansea went into 2017 bottom of the Premier League and favourites to be relegated. Paul Clement, a former no.2 to Carlo Ancelotti at Chelsea, was chosen as the man to lead them away from danger. Four wins in his first six games in-charge showed a rapid improvement and gave them a fighting chance. A run of five defeats in six games in March and early April looked set to cost the club but a 1-0 victory in early May over Everton, coupled with Hull’s shocking home loss to Sunderland put their fate in their own hands.

A week later, a 2-0 success away at Sunderland ensured safety when Hull were beaten 4-0 by Crystal Palace 24 hours later. Swansea finished in 15th place, helped by 15 league goals from new signing Fernando Llorente and some more sizzling displays from the influential Sigurdsson.

 

2017-2018

Despite the return of Bony and the excitement over the loan arrival of Renato Sanches from Bayern Munich, there was concern around The Liberty Stadium as Sigurdsson was sold to Everton and Llorente joined Tottenham Hotspur on transfer deadline day. Those fears looked to be fully warranted as Swansea won just two of their opening 15 matches.

Clement was sacked five days before Christmas following a 3-1 loss to Everton and Swansea spent Christmas Day bottom of the Premier League table. Former Sheffield Wednesday boss Carlos Carvalhal came in as Clement’s successor and has inspired the club away from danger. Swansea go into the final six matches of the season with Premier League safety firmly in their own hands.

The Clubs: Charlton Athletic

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
304 93 82 129 342 442 -100 361 8

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Chris Powell 187
Luke Young 187
Radostin Kishishev 178
Dean Kiely 177
Jonatan Johansson 147
Jason Euell 139
Paul Konchesky 138
Hermann Hreidarsson 132
Matt Holland 126
Shaun Bartlett 123

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Jason Euell 34
Darren Bent 31
Jonatan Johansson 27
Shaun Bartlett 24
Claus Jensen 16
Graham Stuart 14
Kevin Lisbie 14
Matt Holland 11
Andy Hunt 10
Clive Mendonca 8

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Charlton Athletic 5-0 Southampton 22nd August 1998 1998-1999
Charlton Athletic 4-0 Manchester City 19th August 2000 2000-2001
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-4 Charlton Athletic 23rd August 2003 2003-2004
Charlton Athletic 4-0 Norwich City 13th November 2004 2004-2005
Charlton Athletic 4-0 West Ham United 24th February 2007 2006-2007
Manchester City 1-4 Charlton Athletic 30th December 2000 2000-2001
Everton 0-3 Charlton Athletic 29th December 2001 2001-2002
Charlton Athletic 3-0 Aston Villa 22nd February 2003 2002-2003
Charlton Athletic 3-0 Aston Villa 25th August 2004 2004-2005
Middlesbrough 0-3 Charlton Athletic 28th August 2005 2005-2006

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Charlton Athletic 1-6 Leeds United 5th April 2003 2002-2003
West Ham United 5-0 Charlton Athletic 26th December 2000 2000-2001
Tottenham Hotspur 5-1 Charlton Athletic 9th December 2006 2006-2007
Charlton Athletic 0-4 Liverpool FC 19th May 2001 2000-2001
Manchester City 4-0 Charlton Athletic 28th August 2004 2004-2005
Arsenal 4-0 Charlton Athletic 2nd October 2004 2004-2005
Charlton Athletic 0-4 Chelsea 27th November 2004 2004-2005
Charlton Athletic 0-4 Manchester United 1st May 2005 2004-2005
Manchester United 4-0 Charlton Athletic 7th May 2006 2005-2006
Arsenal 4-0 Charlton Athletic 1st January 2007 2006-2007

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Alan Curbishley 7 8th May 2006
Iain Dowie 1 13th November 2006
Les Reed 1 23rd December 2006
Alan Pardew 1 22nd November 2008

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Charlton Athletic 0-4 Chelsea 27th November 2004 34,585 2004-2005
Charlton Athletic 0-2 Chelsea 17th September 2005 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 2-3 Tottenham Hotspur 1st October 2005 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 0-1 Arsenal 26th December 2005 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 2-0 Liverpool FC 8th February 2006 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 0-3 Liverpool FC 16th December 2006 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 0-1 Chelsea 3rd February 2007 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 4-0 West Ham United 24th February 2007 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 1-1 Sheffield United 21st April 2007 27,111 2005-2006
Charlton Athletic 4-0 Norwich City 13th November 2004 27,057 2004-2005

 

Intro

Charlton Athletic reached the Premier League in 1998. They went down in their first season at this level but became stronger for the experience. After an instant promotion in 2000, Charlton spent the next seven years punching above their weight, finishing 7th in 2004. Alan Curbishley stabilised the club into a genuine force until his departure at the end of the 2005-2006 season. Three managers followed in 2006-2007 which ended in relegation and the Addicks look some way away now from re-integrating themselves into the elite.

 

1998-1999

Charlton’s maiden Premier League adventure started brilliantly. Alan Curbishley was Manager of the Month for August and the team kept three clean sheets in their opening three games. This saw them draw 0-0 at Newcastle United and Arsenal, as well as thrash Southampton 5-0 which still remains their biggest-ever Premier League victory.

A run of eight successive defeats in the winter months saw the Addicks drop into the bottom three and they rarely escaped that area in the table afterwards. They never gave up and recorded a tremendous 4-3 away victory on the penultimate weekend of the season at Villa Park. However, a final day home loss to Sheffield Wednesday ensured an instant relegation back to Division One.

 

2000-2001

After the hard lessons of their first Premier League season, Charlton improved greatly on their Premier League return, finishing with 52 points and achieving an excellent finish of 9th in the final standings. The Addicks also scored the Goal of the Season courtesy of Shaun Bartlett’s stunning volley in the 2-0 home win over Leicester City in April. Among the other season highlights were a New Years’ Day victory over Arsenal and a storming comeback from 3-1 down to draw 3-3 with Manchester United. However, they did leak 57 goals which was the worst defensive record outside of the bottom five teams.

 

2001-2002

Curbishley’s 11th season at the helm saw Charlton slip five positions from their previous season finish but it could have been very different. The club were in the race for the UEFA Cup positions and a Chris Powell winner away at Tottenham Hotspur in March took them into the dizzy heights of seventh position. However, they failed to win any of their last eight games to see them end 14th. Club-record signing Jason Euell quickly repaid the faith shown in him, top scoring with 11 goals whilst they were one of only three sides to defeat champions Arsenal, stunning the Gunners 4-2 at Highbury in November.

 

2002-2003

Charlton made a slow start to their 2002-2003 campaign and were bottom of the table in mid-October. A Jason Euell header to beat high-flying Middlesbrough started a rapid turn of fortunes for the playing squad and an undefeated February took them into the top six. It also saw Curbishley win a Manager of the Month award. Unfortunately for the second season running, the Addicks form declined in the closing months. Just one victory from the start of March onwards saw them finish 12th. Euell was top scorer again whilst Scott Parker’s excellent performances in midfield saw him nominated for the PFA Young Player of the Year.

 

2003-2004

2003-2004 would be Charlton’s best-ever Premier League campaign. Despite winning just one of their first six matches, Curbishley’s side took full advantage of stumbling campaigns from Liverpool FC and Newcastle United. They sat in fourth position in early November and a 1-0 victory over Middlesbrough in March saw them reclaim that spot, which would have taken them into the UEFA Champions League. Once again, the season petered out with just two wins in their last 10 games but Charlton still finished in a Premier League high of 7th. Parker was sold to Chelsea for £10 million in the January transfer window, whilst Dean Kiely’s excellent showings in-goal saw him sweep the club’s Player of the Year awards.

 

2004-2005

Although they lost Claus Jensen to Fulham and Paolo di Canio to Lazio in the summer, Alan Curbishley strengthened his squad with the arrivals of Bryan Hughes, Francis Jeffers and Danny Murphy. There were some hefty early season losses though, with the Londoners losing 4-1 at Bolton Wanderers and suffering four-goal losses to Manchester City, Arsenal and Chelsea. A 2-0 victory over European rivals Tottenham Hotspur in March guided Charlton into seventh spot before their traditional end-of-season loss of form. There were no wins in their last 10 outings and therefore, an 11th place finish was slightly disappointing for the supporters after the pre-season expectations.

 

2005-2006

Charlton made a sensational start to their 2005-2006 campaign with Murphy winning praise for his displays in midfield. They won their first five away games which was a new club-record and the goals of Darren Bent helped plug an issue from the previous campaign. Bent scored 18 times to end as the top scoring Englishman, although it wasn’t enough to get him into England’s World Cup squad.

Charlton sat fifth at the end of October but seven defeats from their next nine games ended any European qualification dreams before the New Year. Murphy was sold to Tottenham Hotspur in January and sensing the club was stagnating, Curbishley announced he was leaving at the end of the season moments before they kicked off their final home match of the season against Blackburn Rovers. Charlton finished a lacklustre 13th as they said a fond farewell to the man who had guided them through a largely successful 15 seasons at the helm.

 

2006-2007

Curbishley’s replacement would be the former Crystal Palace boss Iain Dowie but his reign didn’t last long. Charlton won just two of their opening 12 fixtures and he was dismissed with the club in the relegation zone. First-team coach Les Reed stepped into the breach, but also proved unsuitable for the job and he was sacked following a 2-0 loss to Middlesbrough just before Christmas.

Former player Alan Pardew returned to become the club’s third different manager of the season and although there was an improvement in results and performances, the damage had already been done. In their last home match of the season, goals from Dimitar Berbatov and ex-Charlton youth player Jermain Defoe earned Tottenham Hotspur a 2-0 victory and consigned Charlton to the Championship. They haven’t come close to returning to the top-flight since.