Tag Archives: Alan Pardew

Premier League Files: Hayden Mullins

Premier League Career: West Ham United (2005-2009), Portsmouth (2009-2010)

Hayden Mullins is like many other former professionals in the game who is now experiencing the side of coaching and management. Since his playing days ended, he has been doing his coaching badges and now manages Watford’s Under-23 team. His time as a Premier League player was predominately with West Ham United before playing for Portsmouth for 18 months before their relegation in 2010 from the top-flight.

He came through the youth system at Crystal Palace, joining as a trainee in 1996 and signing professional terms two years later. It was ex-England manager Terry Venables who would give him his first-team debut and Mullins impressed at a young age, scoring in only his second league game in a 3-1 loss to Birmingham City in August 1998.

He admitted later that Venables played a major part in his career, saying: “I learnt a lot from him. He took a lot of time with us on the training pitch. He made me feel totally comfortable and didn’t pressure me into it at all.”

He would make over 200 appearances for Crystal Palace and with financial difficulties surrounding the Eagles; they had to rely on youth prodigies like himself and Clinton Morrison to excite the supporters. Crystal Palace made the semi-finals of the League Cup in 2001 and he won the Player of the Year twice for the club including in his last full season at Selhurst Park in 2002-2003. He was even made captain that season by Trevor Francis.

Birmingham tried to sign him in January 2003 but a £600,000 bid was rejected. However, when he decided to turn down a new deal at the end of the season and with his contract running into its final year, Palace had to sell him to recoup some form of transfer fee. He moved to West Ham United in October 2003 for the same fee Birmingham had offered nine months earlier. Mullins became Alan Pardew’s first signing as manager.

He helped the Hammers reached the Division One play-off final in his first season but they lost 1-0 to his former club Crystal Palace and consequently, missed out on promotion to the top-flight. No mistake was made in 2005 with promotion achieved via the play-offs and Mullins was a pivotal figure in the Hammers midfield. He made 37 appearances from 46 league matches and the club were back in the Premier League.

He had a fantastic debut Premier League campaign too as West Ham finished ninth in the table and reached the FA Cup final. However, he missed the showpiece event after being red-carded along with Liverpool FC winger Luis Garcia in a Premier League fixture between the two finalists a few weeks before the cup final. West Ham appealed the red card but like Liverpool, were unsuccessful in getting the dismissals overturned.

The signing of Javier Mascherano at the start of 2006-2007 put Mullins on the bench in the opening weeks of the season but West Ham’s worst run of results in 74 years saw him back in the starting XI towards the end of October and he scored his first top-flight goal in a 2-1 triumph over Blackburn Rovers. He remained at the club through Alan Curbishley’s reign but when Gianfranco Zola took over as manager in September 2008; he wanted to give younger players a chance in the first-team such as Zavon Hines, Jack Collison and Junior Stanislas.

Despite this, Mullins was still a regular in the side, so it was a shock even to him to see Zola allow him to move to Portsmouth in January 2009. He admitted: “I trained on (Sunday) with West Ham and then it all happened very quickly, but I’m very pleased to have joined. It was a great experience to have worked under Gianfranco Zola but it’s a great challenge here to come and work with some really talented players.”

Mullins made 35 Premier League appearances for Pompey but their dire financial position led to administration, a nine-point deduction and relegation from the top-flight in 2010. He did get his chance though to feature in the FA Cup final, having missed out because of suspension four years earlier. Hayden played in an unfamiliar left-back role in Portsmouth’s narrow 1-0 defeat to Chelsea.

He stayed with Pompey despite relegation and was voted Portsmouth Player of the Season for 2010-2011. After a loan period at Reading which ended in promotion to the Premier League, Mullins finished his career with Birmingham City and Notts County. He retired from football at the end of the 2014-2015 campaign.

After hanging up his boots, Mullins returned to Reading, overseeing the development of young academy players who were getting their first experiences of playing first-team football whilst out on-loan. In July 2016, he joined Watford as assistant to Harry Kewell in managing the Under-21 side and was promoted to manager of the Under-23s when Kewell left to take the managerial position at League Two Crawley Town. It is a role Mullins still holds down today.

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Premier League Files: John Salako

Premier League Career: Crystal Palace (1992-1993, 1994-1995), Coventry City (1995-1997), Bolton Wanderers (1998), Charlton Athletic (2000-2001)

Born in Nigeria, John Salako’s first club and most prominent period of his career came at Crystal Palace. He gave a decade of service to the Eagles, experienced the utmost highs during this time of winning five England caps from Graham Taylor in 1991 and two crushing Premier League relegations in 1993 and 1995.

Salako’s game was all about pace and plenty of it. Defenders were often scared to face him with this trait. His imagination meant he had a good pass and decent dribbling skills too. He often linked up well with Chris Armstrong and his best Premier League season was arguably one that saw Palace relegated. In 1994-1995, Salako missed only three games and scored four goals. This included a fantastic double away at Highbury in October 1994 as Alan Smith’s side won 2-1. It was a pleasurable moment for Salako. A knee injury meant he had missed a huge portion of the club’s maiden Premier League season when they went down on the final day with defeat at Arsenal’s ground.

Pre-Premier League, John was part of the Palace squad that reached the FA Cup final in 1990. He started both games but ended up with a loser’s medal after the club were narrowly beaten in the replay by Manchester United.

After Crystal Palace’s second Premier League relegation, Salako moved on in the summer of 1995 to Coventry City. He was a regular in their team, making 72 appearances before a brief loan spell at Bolton Wanderers during the second half of the 1997-1998 season. After an unhappy 10 games with Fulham, Salako returned to the Premier League with Charlton Athletic in 2000. His last Premier League appearance came as a 10-minute substitute against Fulham in September 2001. He moved soon afterwards to Reading before ending his career with Brentford in 2004-2005.

Since retirement, Salako has done some television work for Sky Sports and returned to Crystal Palace as a first-team coach between August 2015 and December 2016 as part of Alan Pardew’s coaching staff. Since March 2017, Salako has been working as a Marketing Director for SME Business Finance.

The Clubs: Crystal Palace

All statistics correct upto 9th January 2019

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
368 103 93 175 393 537 -144 402 10

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Joel Ward 162
Jason Puncheon 153
Wilfried Zaha 147
James McArthur 143
Damien Delaney 130
Scott Dann 123
Wayne Hennessey 105
Yohan Cabaye 96
Andros Townsend 93
Martin Kelly 92

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Wilfried Zaha 25
Chris Armstrong 23
Andy Johnson 21
Christian Benteke 18
Luka Milivojevic 18
James McArthur 16
Dwight Gayle 15
Jason Puncheon 15
Scott Dann 12
Yannick Bolasie 9

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Crystal Palace 5-0 Leicester City 28th April 2018 2017-2018
Crystal Palace 5-1 Newcastle United 28th November 2015 2015-2016
Crystal Palace 4-0 Hull City 14th May 2017 2016-2017
Crystal Palace 4-1 Middlesbrough 12th April 1993 1992-1993
Coventry City 1-4 Crystal Palace 2nd November 1994 1994-1995
Sunderland 1-4 Crystal Palace 11th April 2015 2014-2015
Crystal Palace 4-1 Stoke City 18th September 2016 2016-2017
Crystal Palace 3-0 Ipswich Town 5th November 1994 1994-1995
Crystal Palace 3-0 Tottenham Hotspur 22nd January 2005 2004-2005
Cardiff City 0-3 Crystal Palace 5th April 2014 2013-2014

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Crystal Palace 1-6 Liverpool FC 20th August 1994 1994-1995
Liverpool FC 5-0 Crystal Palace 28th November 1992 1992-1993
Manchester City 5-0 Crystal Palace 6th May 2017 2016-2017
Manchester City 5-0 Crystal Palace 23rd September 2017 2017-2018
Chelsea 6-2 Crystal Palace 11th March 1998 1997-1998
Arsenal 5-1 Crystal Palace 14th February 2005 2004-2005
Wimbledon 4-0 Crystal Palace 9th April 1993 1992-1993
Everton 4-0 Crystal Palace 10th April 2005 2004-2005
Manchester City 4-0 Crystal Palace 16th January 2016 2015-2016
Crystal Palace 0-4 Sunderland 4th February 2017 2016-2017

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Steve Coppell 1 17th May 1993
Alan Smith 1 15th May 1995
Steve Coppell 1 13th March 1998
Iain Dowie 1 22nd May 2006
Ian Holloway 1 23rd October 2013
Tony Pulis 1 14th August 2014
Neil Warnock 1 27th December 2014
Alan Pardew 3 22nd December 2016
Sam Allardyce 1 23rd May 2017
Frank de Boer 1 11th September 2017
Roy Hodgson 2  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Crystal Palace 0-2 Manchester United 21st April 1993 30,115 1992-1993
Crystal Palace 1-3 Tottenham Hotspur 23rd January 2016 28,467 2015-2016
Crystal Palace 1-1 Arsenal 6th November 2004 26,193 2004-2005
Crystal Palace 0-3 Chelsea 13th September 1997 26,186 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 0-0 Arsenal 18th October 1997 26,180 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 0-3 Manchester United 27th April 1998 26,180 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 1-3 Tottenham Hotspur 28th March 1998 26,116 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 1-2 Newcastle United 29th November 1997 26,085 1997-1998
Crystal Palace 2-2 Southampton 7th May 2005 26,066 2004-2005
Crystal Palace 1-0 Liverpool FC 23rd April 2005 26,043 2004-2005

 

Intro

Crystal Palace’s first four Premier League campaigns ended with the same outcome in all of them – relegation from the top-flight. The Eagles have become a sterner and secure outfit since their latest promotion in 2013, although they are often a feature in the survival battle in most seasons. Their best campaign was a 10th place finish under Alan Pardew’s stewardship in 2014-2015 although Roy Hodgson’s achievement to keep them up last season from a position of no goals and no points after seven matches has to be considered extremely highly.

 

1992-1993

Founder members of the Premier League, Crystal Palace struggled to score goals throughout the season after selling Mark Bright in August to Sheffield Wednesday. Palace made a desperate start, winning just once (2-0 away at Everton) in their first 17 matches. However, a run of seven wins in their next 11 games took them closer to mid-table. However, although there were impressive home victories over relegation rivals Crystal Palace and Ipswich Town, the Eagles were relegated on the final day after a 3-0 defeat at Highbury against Arsenal, whilst Oldham beat Southampton 4-3. Steve Coppell resigned after relegation and was replaced by his assistant, Alan Smith.

 

1994-1995

After winning the First Division, Crystal Palace made an immediate return to the top-flight but made a nightmare start, as they were thrashed 6-1 at home by Liverpool FC on the opening day. Alan Smith signed Ray Wilkins to add experience to his midfield but he played just once for the club and left in November to take a managerial role at former club Queens Park Rangers. The Eagles made the semi-finals of both domestic cup competitions but scored just 34 times in 42 league matches which was the lowest tally in the Premier League. Despite the best efforts of Chris Armstrong, Chris Coleman and Gareth Southgate, Palace were relegated on the final day again – this time after failing to beat Newcastle United at St James’ Park.

 

1997-1998

Hopes were high for Crystal Palace’s third Premier League season after the exciting acquisition in pre-season of Italian Attilio Lombardo from Juventus. Lombardo’s experience saw the club become one of the best away sides in the division, spearheading them to outstanding victories away at Leeds United, Sheffield Wednesday and Tottenham Hotspur. In late November, they were 10th in the table. However, they didn’t win any of their next 16 matches and slipped back into relegation trouble. Not helped by constant rumours of a takeover by computer tycoon Mark Goldberg and a desperate home record with just two victories all term at Selhurst Park, the club were relegated again from the top-flight on 27th April after a 3-0 home defeat to Manchester United.

 

2004-2005

It was more final day heartache for the Eagles supporters in 2004-2005 as a 2-2 draw away at Charlton Athletic wasn’t enough to keep them in the top-flight because of West Brom’s home victory over Portsmouth. Iain Dowie’s side won just seven league games but did record notable home victories over Liverpool FC and Tottenham Hotspur, whilst Andy Johnson scored 21 goals as he finished runner-up to Thierry Henry in the race for the Golden Boot.

 

2013-2014

After an eight-year absence, Crystal Palace returned to the Premier League but made a terrible start, losing seven of their first eight matches. Following a 4-1 home loss by Fulham in October, Ian Holloway resigned and was replaced by Tony Pulis. Pulis immediately made the team harder to beat and the Eagles climbed away comfortably from danger to avoid relegation for the first time in their Premier League history. This included a five-match winning run in April as they finished a brilliant 11th.

 

2014-2015

Pre-season plans were thrown in total disarray when after disagreements over the direction of the club with owner Steve Parish, Tony Pulis abruptly resigned just two days before the campaign was due to start. Neil Warnock returned to the club as his successor but just three wins from 18 matches saw the Eagles in the bottom three at Christmas. After a 3-1 defeat to Southampton on Boxing Day, Warnock was the first managerial casualty of the campaign. Parish then pursued and successfully tempted Alan Pardew away from Newcastle United to return to his former club. Pardew galvanised the Eagles to a 10th place finish as they ended as one of the form teams in the second half of the campaign which included a 2-1 home win over champions Manchester City in April.

 

2015-2016

The excellent end to 2014-2015 continued in the first half of the 2015-2016 campaign. The likes of Yohan Cabaye arrived and Wilfried Zaha by now had returned on a permanent basis to his first club. Palace were sixth on New Years’ Day and only a few points off the top four positions. They also became only the second club to defeat Jose Mourinho at home in the Premier League when the Eagles won 2-1 early season at Stamford Bridge. However, a 3-0 reverse to the faltering champions in January started a nightmare run of form that dragged them into relegation danger.

Late season victories over Norwich City and Stoke City kept them safe but a 15th place finish was a major disappointment for everyone connected with the club. The saving grace was a run to the FA Cup final but despite taking the lead against Manchester United, they lost the showpiece event 2-1 after extra time.

 

2016-2017

Alan Pardew was a man under pressure going into 2016-2017 and despite breaking the club’s transfer record to sign Christian Benteke from Liverpool FC, he couldn’t revitalise the Eagles. Just four wins from 17 games and he was sacked just before Christmas and replaced by Sam Allardyce, who was available after his short reign as England boss. Allardyce did the job required, got Benteke scoring, tightened the backline up and wins over Chelsea, Arsenal and Liverpool FC in the last couple of months kept them once again in the Premier League. They finished 14th but Allardyce quit at the end of the season.

 

2017-2018

It was Frank de Boer who succeeded Allardyce but a lack of summer investment and no wins from their opening four matches saw him sacked in mid-September after just 10 weeks in the post. Roy Hodgson returned to his boyhood club but started with three successive defeats. After seven games, the club had no goals, no wins and no points but a 2-1 victory over champions Chelsea was the galvanising lift everyone needed. Crystal Palace remained in relegation trouble for much of the season but always looked like they would have enough in the playing squad, helped by Zaha’s best-ever season in the Premier League and 10 goals from midfielder Luka Milivojevic. In the end, they finished 11th and a 5-0 win at home to Leicester City at the end of April became the club’s biggest-ever Premier League victory.

 

2018-2019

Crystal Palace’s 113th season of existence began with an opening day 2-0 victory over Fulham at Craven Cottage. Hodgson’s side struggled to sustain any consistency in the first four months of the season but they are going in the right direction after wins in December over Burnley, Leicester City and more recently, a surprising and deserving 3-2 victory away at champions Manchester City, helped by a Goal of the Season contender from Andros Townsend.

Premier League Files: Tim Krul

Premier League Career: Newcastle United (2010-2016), Brighton & Hove Albion (2017-2018)

Tim Krul is rebuilding his career in the SkyBet EFL Championship after a frustrating three years of injury and non-selection. Considering how well Norwich City have started this season, he could be back in the Premier League in the future. Previously, he had gained a reputation as one of the best Dutch goalkeepers during a 12-year association with Newcastle United.

Krul linked up with Newcastle in the summer of 2005 after failing to agree professional terms at Dutch club ADO Den Haag, where he’d spent nine years in the youth ranks. Initially, he was third-choice goalkeeper behind the experienced pair of Shay Given and Steve Harper but got his chance sooner than anticipated. In November 2006, he made his senior debut in an UEFA Cup tie away to Palermo. He kept a clean sheet and made some important saves in an impressive Newcastle victory. It was an exciting cameo for what was to come in the future.

The summer of 2007 saw Krul’s reputation continue to rise. He was part of a talented Dutch Under-21 squad that won the European Championships and also helped them qualify for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. To help his experience levels, Newcastle loaned him out for the next two seasons, first to Scottish Championship club Falkirk, then to Carlisle United.

By now, Given had moved on to Manchester City and for 2009-2010, Krul returned to Newcastle in a new no.2 role behind Harper as the club looked to rebuild in the Championship. Harper was the first-choice all season but Krul got some good exposure in the cup competitions and he finally got his league breakthrough in September 2010 when the Magpies were back in the Premier League. When Harper got injured in the 35th minute against Everton at Goodison Park, Krul seized his chance. He kept a clean sheet, continued to impress in Harper’s absence and when Alan Pardew succeeded Chris Hughton, he gave Krul more opportunities over the remainder of the campaign.

In 2011-2012, he was given no.1 goalkeeping status by Pardew as Harper was sent on-loan to Brighton & Hove Albion. He notched up his 50th appearance for the club in a home defeat to Chelsea but did save a penalty on the day from Frank Lampard. Pardew’s confidence in Krul was shown further when he took over the no.1 goalkeeper jersey from Harper for the start of the 2012-2013 season. Injuries to elbow, ankle and shoulder restricted him to 24 Premier League appearances during the campaign but in 2013-2014, he was in terrific form.

Against Tottenham Hotspur in November, he was unbeatable making a total of 14 saves to help the Toon Army record a 1-0 away victory at White Hart Lane. Widely praised by Pavel Srnicek and Pardew after the performance, Krul continued to deliver for the rest of the month and took the honour of November’s Premier League Player of the Month.

His performances ensured he would go to the 2014 World Cup finals with the Netherlands and he made a massive contribution to their third-place finish. With penalties looming in the closing stages of the quarter-finals against Costa Rica, Louis van Gaal had one more substitution left and decided to bring Krul on due to him having a better penalty-saving record than Jasper Cillessen, the regular no.1 goalkeeper. Van Gaal’s tactic worked. Krul saved two spot-kicks and the Dutch prevailed 4-3 on penalties. It was the first time in World Cup history that a goalkeeper was sent on as a substitute solely for a penalty shootout.

In October 2015, Krul suffered a bad knee injury on international duty which ruled him out for the rest of the season. Newcastle were relegated at the end of the season and in August 2016, he was loaned out in an attempt to continue his recovery from injury.

First, he went to Ajax, then AZ Alkmaar but made just nine first-team appearances across the season for the two clubs. With Karl Darlow and Rob Elliot both pressing claims for the first-choice shirt, Krul had already played his final-ever game for Newcastle United. He joined Premier League newcomers Brighton & Hove Albion on a one-year deal in August 2017 but left without making a top-flight league appearance for the Seagulls this summer. He was picked up by Norwich in July 2018 and has already started 12 matches for the Canaries as of October, helping them to be among the early pacesetters in the Championship.

Seasonal Records: 2011-2012

For all the statistical fans out there, here are some of the season’s records from the 2011-2012 Premier League campaign. This was the most dramatic finale to any Premier League season as in its 20th campaign; Manchester City snatched the title away in stoppage-time from Manchester United in the most unbelievable fashion.

FINAL TABLE

Position Team P W D L F A GD PTS
1 Manchester City 38 28 5 5 93 29 +64 89
2 Manchester United 38 28 5 5 89 33 +56 89
3 Arsenal 38 21 7 10 74 49 +25 70
4 Tottenham Hotspur 38 20 9 9 66 41 +25 69
5 Newcastle United 38 19 8 11 56 51 +5 65
6 Chelsea 38 18 10 10 65 46 +19 64
7 Everton 38 15 11 12 50 40 +10 56
8 Liverpool FC 38 14 10 14 47 40 +7 52
9 Fulham 38 14 10 14 48 51 -3 52
10 West Bromwich Albion 38 13 8 17 45 52 -7 47
11 Swansea City 38 12 11 15 44 51 -7 47
12 Norwich City 38 12 11 15 52 66 -14 47
13 Sunderland 38 11 12 15 45 46 -1 45
14 Stoke City 38 11 12 15 36 53 -17 45
15 Wigan Athletic 38 11 10 17 42 62 -20 43
16 Aston Villa 38 7 17 14 37 53 -16 38
17 Queens Park Rangers 38 10 7 21 43 66 -23 37
18 Bolton Wanderers 38 10 6 22 46 77 -31 36
19 Blackburn Rovers 38 8 7 23 48 78 -30 31
20 Wolverhampton Wanderers 38 5 10 23 40 82 -42 25

 

THE BASIC STATS

Goals Scored 1066
European qualifiers Manchester City (UEFA Champions League)

Manchester United (UEFA Champions League)

Arsenal (UEFA Champions League)

Chelsea (UEFA Champions League)

Tottenham Hotspur (UEFA Europa League)

Newcastle United (UEFA Europa League)

Liverpool FC (UEFA Europa League)

Longest winning run 8 games (Manchester United)
Longest unbeaten run 14 games (Manchester City)
Longest winless run 12 games (Wolverhampton Wanderers)
Longest losing run 8 games (Wigan Athletic)
Highest attendance 75,627 (Manchester United vs. Wolverhampton Wanderers)
Lowest attendance 15,195 (Queens Park Rangers vs. Bolton Wanderers)

 

AWARDS

PFA Players’ Player of the Year Robin van Persie (Arsenal)
PFA Young Player of the Year Kyle Walker (Tottenham Hotspur)
Football Writers’ Award Robin van Persie (Arsenal)
PFA Team of the Year Joe Hart, Leighton Baines, Kyle Walker, Fabricio Coloccini, Vincent Kompany, Scott Parker, Yaya Toure, David Silva, Gareth Bale, Wayne Rooney, Robin van Persie
Manager of the Year Alan Pardew (Newcastle United)
Premier League Goal of the Season Papiss Cisse (Chelsea vs. NEWCASTLE UNITED)

 

HAT-TRICK HEROES

Player Teams Score Date
Edin Dzeko (4) Tottenham Hotspur vs. Manchester City 1-5 28th August 2011
Wayne Rooney Manchester United vs. Arsenal 8-2 28th August 2011
Sergio Aguero Manchester City vs. Wigan Athletic 3-0 10th September 2011
Wayne Rooney Bolton Wanderers vs. Manchester United 0-5 10th September 2011
Demba Ba Newcastle United vs. Blackburn Rovers 3-1 24th September 2011
Frank Lampard Bolton Wanderers vs. Chelsea 1-5 2nd October 2011
Andy Johnson Fulham vs. Queens Park Rangers 6-0 2nd October 2011
Robin van Persie Chelsea vs. Arsenal 3-5 29th October 2011
Demba Ba Stoke City vs. Newcastle United 1-3 31st October 2011
Yakubu (4) Blackburn Rovers vs. Swansea City 4-2 3rd December 2011
Dimitar Berbatov Manchester United vs. Wigan Athletic 5-0 26th December 2011
Clint Dempsey Fulham vs. Newcastle United 5-2 21st January 2012
Robin van Persie Arsenal vs. Blackburn Rovers 7-1 4th February 2012
Peter Odemwingie Wolverhampton Wanderers vs. West Bromwich Albion 1-5 12th February 2012
Pavel Pogrebnyak Fulham vs. Wolverhampton Wanderers 5-0 4th March 2012
Steven Gerrard Liverpool FC vs. Everton 3-0 13th March 2012
Carlos Tevez Norwich City vs. Manchester City 1-6 14th April 2012
Luis Suarez Norwich City vs. Liverpool FC 0-3 28th April 2012
Fernando Torres Chelsea vs. Queens Park Rangers 6-1 29th April 2012

 

TOP SCORERS

Position Player Teams No of Goals
1 Robin van Persie Arsenal 30
2 Wayne Rooney Manchester United 27
3 Sergio Aguero Manchester City 23
4= Emmanuel Adebayor Tottenham Hotspur 17
4= Clint Dempsey Fulham 17
4= Yakubu Blackburn Rovers 17
7 Demba Ba Newcastle United 16
8 Grant Holt Norwich City 15
9 Edin Dzeko Manchester City 14
10= Mario Balotelli Manchester City 13
10= Papiss Cisse Newcastle United 13
12= Danny Graham Swansea City 12
12= Steven Fletcher Wolverhampton Wanderers 12
14= Frank Lampard Chelsea 11
14= Jermain Defoe Tottenham Hotspur 11
14= Luis Suarez Liverpool FC 11
14= Rafael van der Vaart Tottenham Hotspur 11
14= Daniel Sturridge Chelsea 11
19= Javier Hernandez Manchester United 10
19= Gareth Bale Tottenham Hotspur 10
19= Peter Odemwingie West Bromwich Albion 10
19= Peter Crouch Stoke City 10
19= Danny Welbeck Manchester United 9
19= Nikica Jelavic Everton 9
19= Steve Morison Norwich City 9

 

BIGGEST VICTORIES

Manchester United 8-2 Arsenal 28th August 2011
Arsenal 7-1 Blackburn Rovers 4th February 2012
Fulham 6-0 Queens Park Rangers 2nd October 2011
Manchester United 1-6 Manchester City 23rd October 2011
Norwich City 1-6 Manchester City 14th April 2012
Chelsea 6-1 Queens Park Rangers 29th April 2012
Fulham 0-5 Manchester United 21st December 2011
Manchester United 5-0 Wigan Athletic 26th December 2011
Bolton Wanderers 0-5 Manchester United 10th September 2011
Wolverhampton Wanderers 0-5 Manchester United 18th March 2012

 

HIGHEST SCORING GAMES

No of Goals Teams Date
10 Manchester United 8-2 Arsenal 28th August 2011
8 Arsenal 7-1 Blackburn Rovers 4th February 2012
8 Chelsea 3-5 Arsenal 29th October 2011
8 Manchester United 4-4 Everton 22nd April 2012
8 Swansea City 4-4 Wolverhampton Wanderers 28th April 2012
7 Manchester United 1-6 Manchester City 23rd October 2011
7 Norwich City 1-6 Manchester City 14th April 2012
7 Chelsea 6-1 Queens Park Rangers 29th April 2012
7 Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham Hotspur 26th February 2012
7 Fulham 5-2 Newcastle United 21st January 2012
7 Blackburn Rovers 4-3 Arsenal 17th September 2011
6 Fulham 6-0 Queens Park Rangers 2nd October 2011
6 Tottenham Hotspur 1-5 Manchester City 28th August 2011
6 Manchester City 5-1 Norwich City 3rd December 2011
6 Bolton Wanderers 1-5 Chelsea 2nd October 2011
6 Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-5 West Bromwich Albion 12th February 2012
6 Aston Villa 2-4 Chelsea 31st March 2012
6 Norwich City 4-2 Newcastle United 10th December 2011
6 Blackburn Rovers 4-2 Swansea City 3rd December 2011
6 Manchester City 3-3 Sunderland 31st March 2012

 

YOUNGEST PLAYERS USED

Player Teams Age at the time Date
Raheem Sterling Liverpool FC 1-2 Wigan Athletic 17 years, 3 months, 16 days 24th March 2012
Adam Henley Wigan Athletic 3-3 Blackburn Rovers 17 years, 5 months, 5 days 19th November 2011
Ross Barkley Everton 0-1 Queens Park Rangers 17 years, 8 months 15 days 20th August 2011
Bruno Andrade Wigan Athletic 2-0 Queens Park Rangers 17 years, 10 months, 25 days 27th August 2011
Anthony Forde Chelsea 3-0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 18 years, 10 days 26th November 2011
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain Manchester United 8-2 Arsenal 18 years, 13 days 28th August 2011
Kerim Frei Swansea City 2-0 Fulham 18 years, 21 days 10th December 2011
Romelu Lukaku Chelsea 3-1 Norwich City 18 years, 3 months, 14 days 27th August 2011
Josh Vela Bolton Wanderers 1-1 Swansea City 18 years, 4 months, 7 days 21st April 2012
Connor Wickham Sunderland 0-1 Newcastle United 18 years, 4 months, 20 days 20th August 2011

 

OLDEST PLAYERS USED

Player Teams Age at the time Date
Brad Friedel Tottenham Hotspur 2-0 Fulham 40 years, 11 months, 25 days 13th May 2012
Mark Schwarzer Tottenham Hotspur 2-0 Fulham 39 years, 7 months, 7 days 13th May 2012
Ryan Giggs Sunderland 0-1 Manchester United 38 years, 5 months, 14 days 13th May 2012
Radek Cerny Arsenal 1-0 Queens Park Rangers 37 years, 10 months, 13 days 31st December 2011
Paul Scholes Sunderland 0-1 Manchester United 37 years, 5 months, 27 days 13th May 2012
Jussi Jaaskelainen Bolton Wanderers 1-1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 36 years, 8 months, 12 days 31st December 2011
Jody Craddock Wolverhampton Wanderers 2-1 Sunderland 36 years, 4 months, 9 days 4th December 2011
Michel Salgado Sunderland 2-1 Blackburn Rovers 36 years, 1 month, 19 days 11th December 2011
Shay Given Norwich City 2-0 Aston Villa 36 years, 23 days 13th May 2012
Thomas Sorensen Stoke City 2-2 Bolton Wanderers 35 years, 11 months, 1 day 13th May 2012

 

CLEAN SHEETS

Position Player Teams No of Clean Sheets
1 Joe Hart Manchester City 17
2 Tim Krul Newcastle United 15
3= Brad Friedel Tottenham Hotspur 14
3= Michel Vorm Swansea City 14
5 David de Gea Manchester United 13
5= Wojciech Szczesny Arsenal 13
7= Tim Howard Everton 12
7= Pepe Reina Liverpool FC 12
9 Simon Mignolet Sunderland 11
10 Petr Cech Chelsea 10

Premier League Files: Marlon Harewood

Premier League Career: Nottingham Forest (1998-1999), West Ham United (2005-2007), Aston Villa (2007-2008), Blackpool (2010-2011)

Marlon Harewood played for no fewer than 14 different clubs before hanging up his boots in 2016 after a spell with non-league side Nuneaton Town. His most prolific run came in the Premier League during two top-flight terms with West Ham United.

Harewood was a product of the youth academy system at Nottingham Forest and made his league debut in 1998. He’d already tasted success in a loan spell with FC Haka in Finland, winning the Finnish Cup and the league championship and had another brief loan period with Ipswich Town. Forest were relegated from the Premier League in 1999 but Harewood started to emerge as one of the best strikers in the First Division. He formed a good partnership with his close friend David Johnson and scored 51 goals in 124 appearances for the former European Cup winners.

His contract at The City Ground was due to expire in 2004. The club offered him a new deal but it was a weaker contract which included a drop in wages. Understandably upset, the offer was rejected by the player and he left to join recently-relegated West Ham United for £500,000 in November 2003. He was West Ham’s top goalscorer in 2004-2005, scoring 23 goals in all competitions as the Hammers returned to the Premier League via the play-offs.

Alan Pardew was the manager and he decided Harewood was the man who should spearhead the club’s attack on their top-flight return. Feeling extremely confident because of this, Marlon scored the first hat-trick of the 2005-2006 season, netting a treble in the 4-0 home win over Aston Villa. Two months later, he scored the club’s quickest goal of the campaign, finding the back of the net inside 52 seconds of the 2-1 defeat against Manchester United. In April 2006, it was Harewood’s goal in the FA Cup semi-finals at Villa Park against Middlesbrough that took West Ham into the final at the Millennium Stadium which ended in an agonising penalty shootout loss to Liverpool FC. In total, he finished with impressive figures of 14 Premier League goals and was the club’s top scorer for a second successive season.

Like many of his Hammers teammates, there was a drop in form in 2006-2007 for Harewood, although he did score a famous late winner at home to Arsenal which sparked a dramatic late altercation on the touchline between his manager Pardew and opposition boss Arsene Wenger. However, the arrival of Carlos Tevez and improvement in Bobby Zamora saw Harewood drop down the pecking order.

After scoring just three times that campaign, he decided to leave the Londoners and joined Aston Villa in July 2007 for £4 million. It looked set Harewood was to join Wigan Athletic until a late intervention from Martin O’Neill swayed Harewood’s decision. It did mean he would be just a peripheral figure though which to start with, seemed to be something Harewood was happy to accept. In November 2007, he scored his 100th league career goal in the 4-0 victory at Blackburn Rovers. He scored another four times in the Premier League including a goal in a 2-2 draw at Anfield and the fans seemed to appreciate his work-rate when arriving from the bench.

O’Neill continued to use him as a regular substitute and he didn’t even start a league match in the first half of the 2008-2009 season. When Emile Heskey arrived from Wigan in January 2009, Harewood’s game time became even more limited. His time in Birmingham was coming to an end. He moved on-loan to first Wolverhampton Wanderers, then Newcastle United.

Aston Villa released him in the summer of 2010 and he was linked with a move away from the English game, with clubs from Turkey and the United States expressing an interest in Harewood. However, he stayed in the Premier League by linking up with Blackpool in August and made a fantastic start too, scoring twice in their sensational 4-0 opening day victory over Wigan Athletic. He then enjoyed his return to Villa Park in November, finding the target in Blackpool’s narrow 3-2 defeat. This was to be his final goal in the top-flight.

He was loaned to Barnsley in February 2011 and was released by Blackpool following their relegation at the end of the campaign. He ended his career with second spells with both Nottingham Forest and Barnsley, along with stints at Guangzhou R&F in China, Bristol City, Hartlepool United and lastly, Nuneaton Town.

Since retirement, Harewood has become a co-owner of AC13 Premier, a car modification business who takes requests from some of sport’s most famous stars. Among his clients include Tottenham forward Harry Kane, ex-boxer Carl Froch and Manchester City full-back Kyle Walker.

Premier League Files: Fabricio Coloccini

Premier League Career: Newcastle United (2008-2009, 2011-2016)

Argentine defender Fabricio Coloccini spent eight years on Tyneside and became a cult figure with supporters of Newcastle United. Signed during Kevin Keegan’s brief second reign in the summer of 2008 from Deportivo La Coruna, Coloccini would captain the club for several seasons and made 275 league appearances for the Magpies.

After beginning his career at Boca Juniors in his native Argentina in 1998, Coloccini attracted the interest of Italian giants AC Milan but he only made one appearance for the Rossoneri and had several loan spells away from the fashionable Italian city. Time away included spells in Spain with Alaves and Villarreal. In January 2005, he joined Deportivo La Coruna on a permanent contract and was a regular starter, featuring 105 times for the former Spanish champions.

Two days before the start of the 2008-2009 campaign, Coloccini made the switch to English football as Newcastle United paid Deportivo £10.3 million. He made his Premier League debut at Old Trafford and it was an impressive opening bow as Newcastle drew 1-1 with Manchester United. He formed a partnership with fellow newcomer Sebastien Bassong but Coloccini initially struggled with the physical demands of the English game. He came under pressing scrutiny for this, especially when Newcastle lost 5-1 at home to Liverpool FC in December 2008. His performances did improve after this game but a final day loss to Aston Villa saw the club relegated to the Championship.

Despite Newcastle’s relegation, Coloccini stayed loyal to the club and was the mainstay of the tightest defence in the division. His great contributions earned him a place in the Championship Team of the Year as the Magpies returned to the top-flight at the first attempt as champions. In late 2010, Coloccini wore the captain’s armband for the first time and marked this feat with his first Premier League goal in the 2-2 home draw with Wigan Athletic. His 2010-2011 campaign of impressive landmarks continued against Tottenham Hotspur when he opened the scoring in the 1-1 draw in his 100th appearance for the club.

When Kevin Nolan swapped the north east for London and West Ham United in the summer of 2011, Coloccini was handed the captain’s armband permanently by manager Alan Pardew. Having previously played sporadically in a partnership with local player Steven Taylor, the pair were the regular centre-back combination in the 2011-2012 season as Newcastle finished in a fantastic fifth position in the table. They conceded only eight goals in their first 11 matches and Coloccini rightfully deserved his place in the Premier League PFA Team of the Year.

It looked like his time on Tyneside would end abruptly in January 2013 when Fabricio stunned the club by handing in a transfer request. He stated personal reasons for the decision, wanting to return to Argentina. San Lorenzo was the club who showed the interest but a transfer fee couldn’t be agreed between the two parties and after further consultation with Pardew, the Argentine elected to stay on until the end of the season and make a more firm decision about his long-term commitments in the summer.

Further persuasion from Pardew in the summer of 2013 convinced Coloccini to stay on with Newcastle determined to hang on to one of their prized assets. In November 2014, he reached the milestone of 200 league appearances for the club in the 1-0 Premier League victory over Liverpool FC. A week later, he scored his first goal in three years with a header in the 2-0 success at The Hawthorns against West Bromwich Albion.

He remained with Newcastle until July 2016 when after their second top-flight relegation during his time at St James’ Park, his contracted was mutually terminated so he could complete his move back to Argentine football. He’d hoped to end his career with San Lorenzo but after just 12 appearances, was made surplus to requirements in the summer of 2017.

The Managers: Alan Pardew

Premier League Clubs Managed: West Ham United (2005-2006), Newcastle United (2010-2014), Crystal Palace (2015-2016), West Bromwich Albion (2017-2018)

Life has been very tough of late for Alan Pardew. The 2012 LMA Manager of the Year hasn’t been able to arrest the slide at West Bromwich Albion and the Baggies’ relegation looks set to be confirmed in the coming weeks. A run of eight successive defeats saw him part company with the club in April 2018.

Pardew has attracted headlines for the wrong reasons and got himself into trouble with the senior authorities on a number of occasions. He is a confident manager who has always believed he can turn around difficult outcomes. He’s often been able to string together a lengthy run of successive victories but at the same time, can be in control of teams who go on worrying runs of consecutive losses too.

His best achievements as a player and manager have been to reach the FA Cup final three times. However, it has been a case of three times unlucky as he has lost on all occasions.

Wonderful winner against mighty Liverpool

Born in the Wimbledon area of London, Pardew started his career as a part-time player in non-league football whilst working as a glazier. His most prolific spell came with Crystal Palace. He joined them in 1987 for a fee of just £7,500. Two years later, he helped them win promotion to the First Division and in 1990, came the greatest moment of his career.

The midfielder scored the winning goal in extra-time of a fantastic FA Cup semi-final against mighty Liverpool FC at Villa Park. The Eagles won 4-3, just seven months after losing 9-0 to the same opposition in a league fixture at Anfield. They were through to the final where they played Manchester United. Despite leading, the game ended in a 3-3 draw and Alex Ferguson’s side won the replay to earn their first major honour as a partnership.

In 1991, Crystal Palace finished a surprising but deserving third in the First Division table before Pardew moved to Charlton Athletic in November 1991. He was the Addicks top goalscorer in the 1992-1993 season with 10 goals and was part of the squad that made a triumphant return to The Valley after several seasons playing at neutral venues across the capital.

He played four times for Tottenham Hotspur during the 1995 UEFA Intertoto Cup, being part of a squad that lost 8-0 to German side 1. FC Köln which remains the club’s heaviest-ever defeat. After a spell with Barnet, he ended his playing career on the books of Reading in 1998, although he never played a first-team game for the Berkshire outfit.

A controversial departure

It would be Reading where Alan would make his first steps as a manager, taking over in a couple of caretaker spells before getting the job permanently in 1999. Reading were toiling in the Second Division at the time and often fighting off relegation but he managed to guide them to serial play-off contenders during his time with the Royals. The likes of Jamie Cureton flourished under his management and in 2002; he won promotion to the First Division automatically.

There were no issues with stepping up to a higher level. In his maiden season as a boss in the second-tier, Pardew’s Reading side finished a stellar fourth but were beaten in the play-offs by Wolverhampton Wanderers. His impressive time with the club attracted the interest of West Ham United and it would be a controversial departure too.

In September 2003, West Ham approached Reading for permission to speak to Alan. Reading rightly refused but Pardew decided to force the hand by tendering his resignation. A compromise was eventually reached and he would take over at Upton Park but it was a sour ending to an excellent first job in management.

Denied by Gerrard

Having been relegated from the Premier League on the final day of the 2002-2003 campaign, West Ham United were firm favourites to make an instant return but the going was much tougher than anticipated. The Hammers had to settle for a place in the play-offs as Norwich City and West Bromwich Albion won the two automatic promotion spots. The play-offs ended in defeat in the final to his old club Crystal Palace.

The 2004-2005 season was just as hard proving that no matter how talented your squad is, getting out of the Championship is very tricky. Yet again, West Ham had to settle for a spot in the play-offs. Pardew was coming under scrutiny from some sections of the Boleyn Ground faithful and failure again would probably cost him his job. This time he prevailed, as Bobby Zamora’s strike defeated Preston North End 1-0 in the final. After two seasons in the wilderness, West Ham were back in the Premier League party.

Their first season back was very impressive. Pardew’s side always posed a threat on the counter-attack and played some enjoyable content which pleased the supporters. They finished ninth in the Premier League and beat Tottenham Hotspur on the final day of the season to deny Spurs a chance in the Champions League. There was also a 3-2 success on the club’s final trip to Highbury – Arsenal’s iconic ground.

The main highlight though was a run to the FA Cup final with the likes of Bolton Wanderers, Manchester City and Middlesbrough being defeated on the road to Cardiff. In the final cup final to be played in the Welsh capital, West Ham took on red-hot favourites Liverpool FC and came within a few moments of winning the cup for the first time in 26 years. They led 2-0 and 3-2 but Pardew was to be denied by Steven Gerrard’s stoppage-time heroics with an exhilarating equaliser. Liverpool would win the penalty shootout leaving the Londoners heartbroken.

It felt like the cup defeat had a negative effect on the dressing room dynamics and despite signing world stars Carlos Tevez and Javier Mascherano, West Ham went on an alarming run of defeats which was their worst run in 70 years. This included a shock League Cup exit at the hands of Chesterfield and UEFA Cup failure at the first hurdle to Palermo.

The new Icelandic owners gave their public backing but a horrible performance and 4-0 loss to Bolton Wanderers in mid-December was the final straw. Pardew was sacked two days later but he would be back in management just over two weeks after this axing.

Charlton woe

On Christmas Eve 2006, Pardew returned to Charlton Athletic, succeeding Les Reed in the job. The Addicks were in the bottom three and struggling to maintain their grip on their Premier League status. Pardew’s first match nearly drew instant success late equaliser from Fulham in controversial circumstances. It would be the story of his reign at The Valley.

Charlton’s form improved, including a 4-0 victory over his former employers in February but it wasn’t enough to avoid the drop. A 2-0 loss to Tottenham Hotspur in the club’s final home match of the season saw Charlton’s seven-season stay in the top-flight come to a sudden end.

The spark seemed to have gone from Pardew. He couldn’t motivate the club to a sustained push for an instant return to the Premier League. Charlton finished a distant 11th in the Championship in 2007-2008 and after slipping into the bottom three of that division in November 2008, he parted company with the club by mutual consent.

His next role was down in League One as he tried to revive Southampton’s fortunes. Despite a points deduction for entering administration, he did bring in plenty of firepower with the likes of Lee Barnard and Rickie Lambert arriving on the south coast. Southampton did win the Football League trophy under his stewardship in April 2010 but with low morale within the staff, he was sacked five months later by owner Nicola Cortese.

It looked like his top-flight days were numbered until Newcastle United came calling.

Defying the critics

In December 2010, Chris Hughton was dismissed as Newcastle United manager and three days after his departure, Pardew was confirmed as his successor. Many Magpies supporters did not want him as their manager and a poll on the Sky Sports website confirmed this. He received just 5.5% backing.

He won his first match in-charge though, defeating Liverpool FC 3-1 and was manager when Newcastle produced one of the greatest comebacks in Premier League history, storming back from 4-0 down at half-time to draw 4-4 with Arsenal in February 2011.

Newcastle finished 12th in 2010-2011 and that summer; they recruited very well, using contacts from France to bring in the likes of Yohan Cabaye, Sylvain Marveaux and on a free transfer from West Ham United, Demba Ba. Ba’s goals in the first half of the season, combined with a solid defensive line-up and the qualities of Cabaye meant he would defy the critics throughout the 2011-2012 season.

Newcastle remained unbeaten until mid-November and were a fixture in the top seven all season. The January arrival of Papiss Cisse from Sport-Club Freiburg added more firepower to the striking ranks and the club enjoyed their best season since Sir Bobby Robson’s final full term in 2004. The Magpies were in the mix for a UEFA Champions League qualification place until the final day when defeat at Everton ensured they’d miss out on a top-three spot. Nevertheless, fifth place in the final table, ahead of Chelsea and Liverpool FC was a stunning achievement. Pardew’s work was recognised and he was awarded LMA Manager of the Year honours.

Crazy moments

In September 2012, he signed an eight-year contract extension but the 2012-2013 season was a major disappointment. Newcastle finished 16th in the table and suffered some damaging defeats, including a heavy 3-0 loss to local rivals Sunderland in April 2013. They did reach a UEFA Europa League quarter-final before losing to Benfica.

The 2013-2014 campaign went better and Alan won the Manager of the Month award for November after four successive victories. The club won at Old Trafford in December and sat sixth in the table going into Christmas. However, Cabaye was sold to Paris Saint-Germain in January and he got into hot water twice in quick succession which put his position in severe jeopardy.

First, he was caught by television cameras using foul and abusive language towards Manchester City manager Manuel Pellegrini during a 2-0 home loss in January. Two months later, he was sent to the stands after head-butting Hull City’s David Meyler following a touchline confrontation. It was an extraordinary incident which saw him fined £160,000 combined by the FA and his own club and given a seven-match ban, three of these games saw him barred from entering the stadium.

There was a tumultuous start to the 2014-2015 season and the relationship between manager and supporters seemed to be at an all-time low. Newcastle sank to bottom in the Premier League after four games and disgruntled fans set-up a website called SackPardew.com in an effort to convince Mike Ashley to dispense with his services. He survived this storm and a run of five successive victories saw the club rocket up the table from 20th to 5th. However, there was always a feeling in the closing weeks of his reign on Tyneside that his time was coming to an end.

After not fulfilling media commitments following a 3-2 home victory against Everton, speculation grew on whether Pardew would leave Newcastle to take the vacancy at Crystal Palace. Two days later, compensation was agreed between the two clubs and Alan was leaving the north east behind to return to a club that was still dear to his heart.

A sound start at Selhurst

When Pardew took over at Selhurst Park, Crystal Palace were in the relegation zone but immediately showed a revival in fortunes. In his first match in-charge, Palace beat Tottenham Hotspur 2-1 and would beat both Manchester City and Liverpool FC before the season’s end. Crystal Palace finished the 2014-2015 campaign in 10th place which remains their best-ever Premier League finish. In doing so, he became the first manager to take over a side in the drop zone and guide them to a top-half finish.

It was a sound start and the first half of the 2015-2016 campaign went swimmingly too, helped by acquiring Cabaye again after he fell out of favour at Paris Saint-Germain. After 19 games, Palace sat in fifth position and looked set to launch a serious challenge for a European spot in the most unpredictable Premier League season.

However, a dismal run followed. Crystal Palace went 14 league games without a victory and plummeted down the table into the bottom five. Late season victories over Norwich City and Stoke City removed any late threat of a relegation battle but finishing 15th at the end of the season was not what anyone hoped for. Alan’s salvation was another excellent run in the FA Cup and another final which ended in another agonising defeat. Manchester United came from behind to defeat the Eagles 2-1 after extra-time in the Wembley showpiece. It was the third time he’d experience FA Cup final heartache as a player/manager.

The poor league form continued throughout the first half of the 2016-2017 season. Despite a three-game winning sequence in September that did have them briefly upto seventh and above eventual champions Chelsea, another dire sequence of results followed. One win in 11 saw the south Londoners slip down to 17th in the table and a few days before Christmas 2016, Pardew was sacked after a 1-0 loss to Chelsea.

After a stint working as a TV pundit for Sky Sports, Pardew returned to the managerial dugout at West Bromwich Albion in November 2017. He replaced Tony Pulis at the helm but his record was nothing short of disastrous. He won just three matches in all competitions from 20 games, earning him a grim win ratio rate of just 15%. West Brom won only once in the Premier League during his reign – a 2-0 success over Brighton & Hove Albion in January and a run of eight successive losses means relegation from the Premier League at the end of the campaign is now just a mere formality. In early April, he parted company with the Baggies by mutual consent.

Alan Pardew has always tried to play football the right way and encourage an expansive style but his recent spells in management since leaving Newcastle United haven’t gone to plan. With the nightmare he has recently experienced at West Bromwich Albion, it is more likely he will be a TV pundit than a manager in future seasons to come.

Iconic Moments: Pardew’s head-butt (March 2014)

Alan Pardew has had a colourful managerial career and been involved in plenty of touchline spats, from shoving fourth officials out of the way, to almost starting a fight with Arsene Wenger during his time as boss of West Ham United. His most explosive moment came though during his stint at Newcastle United.

Newcastle were winning fairly comfortably away at Hull City when Pardew took exception to being pushed by Hull midfielder David Meyler. In all fairness, Meyler was only trying to get the ball back quickly to take a quick throw-in and felt the Newcastle boss had unfairly impeded him. What Pardew did next was totally unacceptable.

Pardew, incensed by being shoved, reacted by throwing a head-butt in Meyler’s direction which understandably agitated the player. He had to be calmed down quickly by his colleagues to resist a reaction to this violent conduct. Referee Kevin Friend sent Pardew to the stands and he quickly apologised for his actions. However, the damage had been well and truly done.

He admitted a misconduct charge and was given a seven-match ban, the first three of those as a total ban from entering the stadium. It remains the longest suspension handed out by the FA to an active manager in Premier League history.

The Clubs: Newcastle United

All data correct upto 26th February 2018

All-Time Premier League Record

Played Won Drew Lost Scored Conceded Goal Difference Points No of Seasons
872 329 225 318 1195 1178 +17 1212 23

 

Most Premier League Appearances

Player Appearances Total
Shay Given 354
Alan Shearer 303
Shola Ameobi 294
Rob Lee 267
Nolberto Solano 230
Gary Speed 213
Fabricio Coloccini 211
Aaron Hughes 205
Steven Taylor 194
Kieron Dyer 190

 

Most Premier League Goals

Player Goals Total
Alan Shearer 148
Peter Beardsley 47
Andy Cole 43
Shola Ameobi 43
Les Ferdinand 41
Papiss Cisse 37
Nolberto Solano 37
Rob Lee 34
Demba Ba 29
Gary Speed 29

 

Biggest Premier League Victories

Match Date Season
Newcastle United 8-0 Sheffield Wednesday 19th September 1999 1999-2000
Newcastle United 7-1 Swindon Town 12th March 1994 1993-1994
Newcastle United 7-1 Tottenham Hotspur 28th December 1996 1996-1997
Newcastle United 6-0 Aston Villa 22nd August 2010 2010-2011
Newcastle United 6-1 Wimbledon 21st October 1995 1995-1996
Newcastle United 5-0 Manchester United 20th October 1996 1996-1997
Newcastle United 5-0 Nottingham Forest 11th May 1997 1996-1997
Newcastle United 5-0 Southampton 16th January 2000 1999-2000
Newcastle United 5-0 West Ham United 5th January 2011 2010-2011
Newcastle United 6-2 Everton 29th March 2002 2001-2002

 

Worst Premier League Defeats

Match Date Season
Manchester United 6-0 Newcastle United 12th January 2008 2007-2008
Newcastle United 0-6 Liverpool FC 27th April 2013 2012-2013
Manchester City 6-1 Newcastle United 3rd October 2015 2015-2016
Arsenal 5-0 Newcastle United 9th December 2000 2000-2001
Chelsea 5-0 Newcastle United 9th November 2003 2003-2004
Tottenham Hotspur 5-0 Newcastle United 11th February 2012 2011-2012
Manchester City 5-0 Newcastle United 21st February 2015 2014-2015
Arsenal 7-3 Newcastle United 29th December 2012 2012-2013
Newcastle United 2-6 Manchester United 12th April 2003 2002-2003
Manchester United 5-1 Newcastle United 29th August 1999 1999-2000

 

Managers

Manager No of Seasons managed Left the Club
Kevin Keegan 4 8th January 1997
Kenny Dalglish 3 27th August 1998
Ruud Gullit 2 28th August 1999
Sir Bobby Robson 6 30th August 2004
Graeme Souness 2 2nd February 2006
Glenn Roeder 2 6th May 2007
Sam Allardyce 1 9th January 2008
Kevin Keegan 2 4th September 2008
Joe Kinnear 1 1st April 2009
Alan Shearer 1 24th May 2009
Chris Hughton 1 6th December 2010
Alan Pardew 5 30th December 2014
John Carver 1 9th June 2015
Steve McClaren 1 11th March 2016
Rafa Benitez 2  

 

Highest Home Attendances

Match Date Attendance Figure Season
Newcastle United 0-2 Manchester City 6th May 2012 52,389 2011-2012
Newcastle United 1-1 Sunderland 4th March 2012 52,388 2011-2012
Newcastle United 2-1 Tottenham Hotspur 18th August 2012 52,385 2012-2013
Newcastle United 2-0 Liverpool FC 1st April 2012 52,363 2011-2012
Newcastle United 0-3 Sunderland 14th April 2013 52,355 2012-2013
Newcastle United 0-1 Arsenal 19th May 2013 52,354 2012-2013
Newcastle United 0-6 Liverpool FC 27th April 2013 52,351 2012-2013
Newcastle United 0-2 Manchester United 28th August 2005 52,327 2005-2006
Newcastle United 1-1 Chelsea 15th May 2005 52,326 2004-2005
Newcastle United 1-0 Liverpool FC 5th March 2005 52,323 2004-2005

 

Intro

Newcastle United were once christened “The Entertainers” as their gung-ho approach to attacking football almost landed them a Premier League title under Kevin Keegan in 1996. The Magpies have often lurched from one crisis to another and although there have been some impressive campaigns under the guidance of Sir Bobby Robson and Alan Pardew, they’ve lurched more often than not with relegation and fell through the trapdoor in both 2009 and 2016. Former Champions League winning manager Rafa Benitez is hoping to avoid a similar situation in 2018.

 

1993-1994

Kevin Keegan brought Newcastle United into the Premier League in 1993 and they immediately became the team to watch. The Magpies finished a fantastic third in the table and scored more goals than any other side in the season. Andy Cole finished as the winner of the Golden Boot with 34 goals, whilst Peter Beardsley returned to Tyneside and also chipped in with 20+ goals. Among the highlights in terms of results was a 3-0 home win over Liverpool FC where Cole scored a first half hat-trick and a 7-1 drubbing in March 1994 of hapless Swindon Town.

 

1994-1995

Newcastle made a red-hot start to the 1994-1995 campaign, winning their first six league matches and staying undefeated for the first 11 games. A 2-0 defeat at Old Trafford to Manchester United saw the beginning of their challenge to derail. Top spot was surrendered following defeat to Wimbledon a month later and Keegan’s side faded to sixth and missed out on European qualification. Cole was sold controversially to Manchester United for a British transfer record in January 1995 but the money would be reinvested that summer. Rob Lee was one of the stars of the team with his early season form winning him international recognition from England.

 

1995-1996

In the summer of 1995, Keegan spent the Cole money on Les Ferdinand. His £6 million arrival was one of several signings during the season. David Ginola and Warren Barton were among the other pre-season captures whilst David Batty and Faustino Asprilla joined the group during the season. The Toon Army made another searing start and lost just three times between August and mid-February. A 2-1 win over Bolton Wanderers in mid-January saw Newcastle establish a fantastic position. They were 12 points clear and odds-on to win the Premier League title.

Then, they collapsed and opened the door for Manchester United. Defeats to West Ham United, Arsenal and Blackburn Rovers along with losing the 4-3 classic at Anfield saw them slip behind their rivals from Old Trafford. Although they dug out three successive 1-0 victories in April, Keegan’s side finished gallant runners-up; four points shy of the Red Devils. It did feel like a golden opportunity missed.

 

1996-1997

Keegan cheered the fans up after the near-miss of the previous campaign as he persuaded Alan Shearer to return home. The local Geordie joined from Blackburn Rovers for £15 million in a world-record transfer fee. In October 1996, Newcastle dished out the perfect revenge on Manchester United, dismantling Alex Ferguson’s side 5-0 on Tyneside with Philippe Albert’s delicate chip of Peter Schmeichel one of the finest moments of the season.

However, the fans would be left devastated as Keegan suddenly resigned in early January. He was replaced by Kenny Dalglish and they finished second for the second successive season, edging out Arsenal and Liverpool FC on goal difference to claim a place in the group stages of next season’s UEFA Champions League.

 

1997-1998

After the joys of the previous two seasons, Newcastle dropped to 13th in 1997-1998 and only guaranteed their Premier League survival with a win over Chelsea on the penultimate weekend of the season. Pre-season preparations were severely damaged by a serious knee injury for Shearer in a tournament on Merseyside. That kept him out of action until mid-January and with Ferdinand sold to Tottenham Hotspur, the goals dried up. There was also some issues off-the-pitch. Directors Freddy Shepherd and Douglas Hall were forced to resign after being caught in a tabloid sting which saw them mock Shearer and make fun of the club’s own supporters.

 

1998-1999

Kenny Dalglish lasted just two games into the 1998-1999 campaign. He resigned and was replaced by Ruud Gullit. The Dutchman was given a rude awakening as Liverpool FC thrashed Newcastle 4-1 in his first match in the dugout. Three straight wins did follow which got Newcastle upto fifth but that was the peak as the league season tailed off again. Even the arrival of Duncan Ferguson from Everton in November couldn’t set pulses racing. Newcastle finished 13th for the second successive season and lost the FA Cup final to Manchester United at Wembley Stadium.

 

1999-2000

Newcastle were plunged into crisis in the early weeks of the season. The first shock of was the sending off of skipper Shearer in the opening day loss at home to Aston Villa. Back-to-back away defeats to Tottenham Hotspur and Southampton followed and then, Gullit controversially left Shearer on the bench for the Tyne & Wear Derby against Sunderland. The Black Cats won 2-1 and Gullit quit 48 hours later, having lost the power struggle against the captain. Sir Bobby Robson took over, stabilised the club and ensured comfortable survival. Newcastle finished 11th and recorded their biggest-ever Premier League victory too – beating Sheffield Wednesday 8-0 with Shearer scoring five goals.

 

2000-2001

Robson’s first full season as Newcastle manager turned out to be an unremarkable time as the club finished 11th again – 10 points shy of the European qualification positions. Shearer missed a huge portion of the season with injury and the £7 million spent on youngster Carl Cort from Wimbledon was poor business. A 3-1 win away at Leeds in January did take Newcastle sixth in the table but ultimately, a seven-game winless run that followed meant it was another season of mid-table mediocrity for the Geordie faithful.

 

2001-2002

Newcastle made a quantum leap forward in 2001-2002 and the signings of Craig Bellamy and Laurent Robert added plenty of pace and flair to their attack. Shearer scored 23 goals in the Premier League, only narrowly missing out on the Golden Boot to Arsenal’s Thierry Henry. A 3-1 victory at Highbury over Arsenal in December ended a four-year drought without a victory in the capital and an exciting 4-3 success at Leeds ensured Newcastle topped the table at Christmas. They stayed in the title race until back-to-back losses to Arsenal and Liverpool FC in March. However, a 2-2 draw at Blackburn in April with both goals from Shearer ensured UEFA Champions League football for only the second time in the club’s history.

 

2002-2003

Although they finished with fewer points than in 2001-2002, Newcastle actually improved position in the table to finish a fantastic third, only behind Manchester United and Arsenal in the final rankings. Robson’s side made a slow start, losing three of their first five matches and conceding five goals in away defeats to both Blackburn Rovers and Manchester United.

Newcastle starting putting results together though in the autumn months and emerged as a potential outsider for the title come springtime. The £8 million arrival of Jonathan Woodgate from Leeds United helped bolster the defensive numbers but consecutive defeats in April to Everton and a 6-2 beating at home by Manchester United finished off those lingering title dreams. Nevertheless, Newcastle brushed off challenges from Chelsea and Liverpool FC to secure a deserved top-three finish.

 

2003-2004

Newcastle’s season never really psychologically recovered from a surprise exit in the UEFA Champions League qualifying rounds to Partizan Belgrade, losing a penalty shootout at St. James’ Park. They played poorly away from home all season, collecting a staggering 12 draws on their travels and winning just twice at Middlesbrough and Fulham.

It took until early October for a first Premier League win to be recorded at home to Southampton and it was the Saints who finished off their aspirations of nicking fourth spot from Liverpool FC, as Newcastle drew 3-3 at St. Mary’s in the season’s final week. Many fans were disgruntled by the backwards step made by the club especially as no money was spent all season. Lee Bowyer was the only arrival and that was on a free transfer from relegated West Ham United.

 

2004-2005

Sir Bobby Robson’s five-year tenure at the club was ended four games into the season. Just two points were gained and two days after a 4-2 defeat to Aston Villa where he’d left Alan Shearer on the bench saw him asked to clear his desk by chairman Freddy Shepherd.

Graeme Souness resigned as Blackburn Rovers manager to fill the vacancy on Tyneside and a 10-match unbeaten run in all competitions suggested better times might follow but Newcastle lacked any consistency to launch a European challenge via the league. Key player Craig Bellamy was loaned out to Celtic in January after falling out with Souness and worse was to follow.

In April, teammates Kieron Dyer and Lee Bowyer started fighting each other during a 3-0 home defeat to Aston Villa. Both were sent off and banned, with Bowyer fined six weeks’ wages and from that moment on, any momentum was lost. Newcastle quickly exited the latter stages of the FA Cup and UEFA Cup and finished a dreary 14th in the league table – their worst finish to this date.

 

2005-2006

To try and solve their goalscoring woes, Souness and Shearer managed to persuade Michael Owen to join Newcastle from Real Madrid for a club-record fee of £17 million that still stands today. Unfortunately, Owen sustained a broken metatarsal in a New Years’ Eve defeat to Tottenham Hotspur that ruled him out for the second half of the season.

Shearer retired at the end of the campaign, scoring in his final appearance during a Tyne & Wear Derby victory over Sunderland. Two months earlier, he became Newcastle’s highest all-time goalscorer in their history, surpassing the great Jackie Millburn’s total of 200 goals against Portsmouth.

Souness had gone well before the season’s end. He was sacked in early February after a dreary 3-0 defeat to Manchester City. Academy director Glenn Roeder took charge on a caretaker basis and guided the club from 15th on his arrival to a 7th-place finish that won him a two-year contract as manager.

 

2006-2007

Damien Duff and Obafemi Martins were the main summer arrivals in the first campaign since 1996 to start without Alan Shearer among the playing squad. Scott Parker succeeded him as captain but the momentum that Newcastle had attained at the end of the previous campaign did not transfer into this season. A large injury crisis, constant speculation about the future ownership of the club and a lack of results saw Newcastle finish a tame 13th in the table. Roeder resigned a week before the season’s end and Sam Allardyce was appointed as his successor.

 

2007-2008

Businessman Mike Ashley became the club’s new owner after buying Sir John Hall’s 41.6% share for £55 million. His arrival came a week after Allardyce’s appointment as manager and it soon became clear that he would not be able to stamp his authority on the place. Being the only side to lose all season to Derby County didn’t help.

A poor November saw the club slide into the bottom half of the table and the natives were getting restless again. Allardyce’s contract was terminated by mutual consent in early January and Ashley made the surprising move of bringing Kevin Keegan back for a second spell as manager. It took him nine games to taste victory in the Premier League but he did guide the Magpies away from danger to 12th. Worse would follow though for the long-suffering supporters.

 

2008-2009

A major falling out between Keegan and the board in early September started a chain reaction for Newcastle’s most chaotic season to-date. He resigned, stating the failure to have complete control over player transfers as the reason for his second departure from the club.

Joe Kinnear was not a popular choice and his reign only lasted until early February when health problems meant he had to stand down. Popular players like Shay Given and Charles N’Zogbia were sold and sensing relegation as a real possibility, Ashley asked club legend Alan Shearer to vacate his place on the BBC Match of the Day sofa to take charge of the club in an interim capacity for the last eight games of the season.

He only won once (against Middlesbrough) and a Damien Duff own goal on the final day of the season at Villa Park consigned them to relegation, ending their 16-year stay in the top-flight.

As Sky commentator Martin Tyler said on the final day: “From undermining Kevin Keegan to overtaxing Alan Shearer, it has been disastrous.”

 

2010-2011

Under the guidance of Chris Hughton, Newcastle returned to the top-flight at the first attempt and achieved some impressive early season results. Aston Villa were thumped 6-0, Sunderland well-beaten 5-1 and an Andy Carroll header beat Arsenal at The Emirates Stadium. Hughton though was never the preferred appointment of Ashley and he was sacked following a 3-1 defeat in early December to West Bromwich Albion.

Former Southampton and Charlton manager Alan Pardew was his replacement and again, not an appointment the fans wanted. He started well with a 3-1 win over Liverpool FC but the sale of fans’ favourite Carroll on transfer deadline day for £35 million to the Merseysiders once again stretched the relationship between fans and board to breaking point.

A sensational comeback to draw 4-4 with Arsenal did sooth the pain of no replacement being brought in to replace Carroll and Newcastle finished 12th in the final standings, although it could have been ninth but for throwing away a 3-0 lead on the final day against West Bromwich Albion to draw 3-3.

 

2011-2012

Pardew inspired a wonderful 2011-2012 season from his team which still had them as an outsider to qualify for the UEFA Champions League on the final day.

After going through their first 11 Premier League games unbeaten, Newcastle then failed to win in six consecutive games in November and December, mainly due to a spate of injuries among key defenders. The team recorded a resounding 3–0 home win over champions Manchester United in January and also produced excellent victories away to Chelsea and at home to Liverpool FC.

Demba Ba arrived on a free transfer and scored two hat-tricks in the first half of the campaign. In January, Senegalese forward Papiss Cisse joined from Bundesliga side Sport-Club Freiburg and made a sensational start, scoring 13 goals in just 14 appearances. Defeats in their final two games saw Newcastle finish in fifth place but qualify for the UEFA Europa League. Pardew’s achievement was noted as he won the LMA Manager of the Year award.

 

2012-2013

Following a great campaign in 2011-2012, it was back to struggles in 2012-2013. Newcastle lost 19 of their 38 matches and experienced their worst Premier League home defeat too, losing 6-0 to Liverpool FC in April.

Ba was sold to Chelsea in the January transfer window and Newcastle finished just five points above the bottom three in 16th position. The only highlight was a run to the quarter-finals of the UEFA Europa League.

 

2013-2014

In the off-season, Newcastle confirmed the return of Joe Kinnear to the club as Director of Football, much to the chagrin of the supporters. The only arrival in the summer was the loan signing of Loic Remy from relegated Queens Park Rangers. A 4-0 defeat on opening weekend to Manchester City was a bad start but Newcastle finish 2013 in the mix for the European positions. This is thanks to the goals of Remy, the outstanding form of Yohan Cabaye and excellent victories over Chelsea, Tottenham Hotspur and a first win at Old Trafford since February 1972.

Cabaye was sold to Paris Saint-Germain for £19 million in the January transfer window and Pardew attracted bad headlines when he head-butted Hull’s David Meyler during a touchline confrontation in March at the KC Stadium. He received a seven-match ban for his actions and Newcastle’s season faded badly in the closing weeks as they limp to the end in 10th place, having lost seven of their last eight matches.

 

2014-2015

Newcastle started the season without a win from their opening eight Premier League games and Pardew was faced with growing pressure from frustrated fans, who start a website SackPardew.com to try and get the board to act on the poor results. He turned the corner with a run of six successive victories that took them from 20th to 5th in the table but in late December, he left the club to fill the vacancy at Crystal Palace.

Long-serving assistant John Carver got his chance in the spotlight but his managerial reign did not go well. He presided over some of Newcastle’s worst-ever league form, including a run of eight consecutive defeats. A win over West Ham on the final day of the season ultimately secured Newcastle’s survival at the expense of Hull City.

 

2015-2016

Steve McClaren was appointed as manager in pre-season but the 2015-2016 campaign was another disappointing one for Newcastle supporters. They didn’t win a match until mid-October, when summer arrival Georginio Wijnaldum scores four goals in a 6-2 victory over Norwich. Back-to-back victories against Liverpool FC and Tottenham Hotspur in December suggest a potential revival but McClaren’s lack of enthusiasm and results speaks for itself. A shattering 3-1 home loss to AFC Bournemouth in March saw his tenure end five days later.

Rafa Benitez was appointed as his successor but he arrived too late to save the club. Despite staying unbeaten in their last six games and a 5-1 victory over Tottenham on the last day, Newcastle are relegated but Benitez does eventually decide to stay on as manager, surprising many experts by signing a three-year contract.

 

2017-2018

Under Benitez, the Magpies hit the heights of sixth place after a 1-0 home win over Crystal Palace in October. However, a 1-0 loss to Burnley in their next match starts an alarming run of eight defeats in their next nine matches. Victories away at West Ham and Stoke over the Christmas programme keep Newcastle above the bottom three and Matt Ritchie’s recent winner against Manchester United suggests the manager’s ability to get the maximum out of his squad mean they are more than likely to maintain their top-flight status at the end of the season.

Iconic Moments: An Argentine ownership opera at West Ham (August 2006)

The East End of London has seen some unbelievable drama down the years in the Premier League but even EastEnders would have struggled to have matched the ownership opera of two star Argentine players that could have had severe repercussions for West Ham United in 2006.

When West Ham signed South American superstars Javier Mascherano and Carlos Tevez on the August transfer deadline day from Corinthians, it was seen as a real coup. Both players had sparkled in the World Cup finals that summer in Germany and had been linked to leaving their home continent and joining one of the European superpower sides. It was even a surprise to Hammers manager Alan Pardew but he was never going to pass up the opportunity to sign these two players.

The club claimed they had agreements with the players’ representatives but there was suspicion seen by several of the Londoners rivals about the legality of the transfers. It came more to light in January 2007 when Mascherano left after an unhappy few months at Upton Park and joined Liverpool FC, initially on-loan before it became a permanent deal more than a year later.

Also that month, West Ham were asked to provide details of their agreement with the representatives of Tevez and Mascherano and this was something they failed to comply with. They were linked with Media Sports Investment, a company formerly run by Kia Joorabchian.

In March, West Ham were given two charges of breaching transfer regulations over third-party ownership which was strictly forbidden. In a statement, the Premier League said: “It is the board’s complaint that there were agreements in relation to both these transfers that enabled third parties to acquire the ability materially to influence the club’s policies and/or the performance of its teams in League matches and/or the competitions set out in Rule E10. The board’s view is this constitutes a breach of rule U18.”

A points deduction was expected. As they were 10 points adrift of safety before the charges were made, a docking of points would have seen the club all-but relegated. At this stage, Tevez finally clicked into form, scoring goals on a regular basis as West Ham began a late season surge towards safety. Before the season ended, West Ham pleaded guilty at a tribunal to the charges. They were given a hefty £5.5 million fine but escaped a points deduction. This infuriated their relegation rivals, Sheffield United, Fulham and Wigan Athletic. Ultimately, West Ham survived on the final day with a victory at Old Trafford and it was the Blades who were relegated to the Championship.

Tevez scored the winner that day at Old Trafford and would spend the next two years playing at the Theatre of Dreams and winning back-to-back titles. He was the driving force behind the Hammers’ escape act of 2006-2007 but it still remains one of the most controversial transfer dealings in Premier League history.

Memorable Matches: Newcastle United 3-3 Crystal Palace (August 2014)

Goalscorers: Dwight Gayle 1, Daryl Janmaat 37, Jason Puncheon 48, Rolando Aarons 73, Mike Williamson 88, Wilfried Zaha 90

Teams:

Newcastle United: Tim Krul, Fabricio Coloccini, Massadio Haidara, Daryl Janmaat (Vurnon Anita 79), Mike Williamson, Remy Cabella, Jack Colback, Moussa Sissoko, Siem de Jong (Ayoze Perez 79), Yoan Gouffran (Rolando Aarons 67), Emmanuel Riviere

Crystal Palace: Julian Speroni, Scott Dann, Damien Delaney, Martin Kelly, Adrian Mariappa, Joel Ward, Mile Jedinak, Yannick Bolasie (Glenn Murray 83), Jason Puncheon, Marouane Chamakh (Fraizer Campbell 52), Dwight Gayle (Wilfried Zaha 70)

Referee: Mike Jones, Attendance: 49,226

This encounter in late August was between two teams who hadn’t enjoyed positive starts to the 2014-2015 Premier League campaign. Newcastle United had failed to score in their first two matches, whilst Crystal Palace had started without a manager after Tony Pulis’ abrupt departure on the eve of the campaign and two successive defeats. However, they had appointed Neil Warnock on the eve of the game for his second spell at Selhurst Park. It would be a thrilling return.

The visitors made a wonderful start and Dwight Gayle scored the opening goal after just 29 seconds. He was in the right place to finish from close-range after Tim Krul had diverted Marouane Chamakh’s effort onto the post. This followed up a midweek hat-trick for Gayle in the League Cup win over Walsall.

Managed at the time by Alan Pardew, Newcastle knew they needed to end their goalscoring drought; otherwise the natives on Tyneside would get incredibly restless. Sure enough, they levelled eight minutes before the interval. Full-back Daryl Janmaat broke into the box and when his first attempt on-goal was blocked, he followed up swiftly to defeat Julian Speroni and level the scores. It was his first Newcastle goal since joining in the summer from Dutch side Feyenoord.

Only a couple of minutes had passed in the second half before Jason Puncheon restored Palace’s lead. Newcastle backed off Puncheon and it was a fatal error. His volley took a nick off Fabricio Coloccini which was enough to leave goalkeeper Krul stranded and beaten for the second time in the afternoon. It was a nice moment for Puncheon. Doubts had immediately surfaced about his future at the club after Warnock’s appointment. The pair had fallen out the previous season over a missed penalty at Tottenham when Warnock was a TV pundit. An unsavoury post on Twitter followed from the midfielder, earning him a £15,000 fine from the FA for his actions.

Pardew responded by bringing on 18-year-old Rolando Aarons and the Jamaican added some zest to the Newcastle attack. He scored his first senior goal in the 73rd minute, heading home in the penalty area after Scott Dann had failed to clear Remy Cabella’s corner. Aarons then had a big part to play in Newcastle taking the lead. His 88th minute shot hit the bar but fell perfectly for Mike Williamson to tap home his first Magpies’ goal.

However, just when it looked like the points would be staying in the north east, Palace rallied again. In the fifth minute of stoppage-time, Newcastle failed to clear their defensive lines and Wilfried Zaha bashed home an equaliser in his first game back at the club on-loan from Manchester United.

A point apiece was a fair result. Warnock would be sacked by December and he would be replaced by…Newcastle manager Alan Pardew. He took the Eagles’ to their highest league finish in the Premier League era of 10th.